South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 24, 2016 6:00 am

WERNHER, BEIT & Co. - (formerly Jules Porges & Co.)

Kimberley


It is reported that Wernhow (sic), Beit & Co., diamond merchants, of London, have contributed $250,000 for the equipment of British yeomanry for the war with the Boers. Mr. Beit, of the firm, is said to have amassed a fortune of more than $100,000,000 by his connection with South African mining.

Source: The Trader - February 1900


MESSRS. WERNHER, BEIT, & CO.

Chief among the leaders of the Rand mining industry is the well-known firm of Messrs. Wernher, Beit, & Co., which has occupied a conspicuous position both on the diamond and goldfields of South Africa for many years past. In Kimberley, at the time of the amalgamation of the diamond mines, the firm's influence was exerted in favour of Mr. Rhodes' unification scheme, and ever since the granting of the charter Mr. A. Beit has not only taken a great personal interest in Rhodesia, but he liberally and consistently supported the late Mr. Rhodes in all his undertakings having for their object the advancement of that country, including the Trans-Continental Railway and Telegraphs. Both Mr. Wernher and Mr. Beit take a very practical interest in South Africa, more especially its mining industry, for the development of which they have done so much, and the other members of the “house,” Mr. Lionel Phillips, and Mr. F. Eckstein, are no less active in their endeavours to promote the prosperity of the country with which they have for many years been associated. Like many others who afterwards rose to positions of considerable eminence in Johannesburg, Mr. Lionel Phillips gained his experience of South African mining at Kimberley. On going to the Rand in 1889 he readily adapted himself to his surroundings, and acquired a general knowledge of Transvaal mining such as is possessed by few men. On several occasions Mr. Phillips was President of the Chamber of Mines at Johannesburg, and his addresses at the annual meetings of that institution were the most excellent of their kind, and were always looked forward to by members of the Chamber with great interest.


Source: The African Review - 19th April 1902


The business changed on the 1st January 1890 from Jules Porges & Co. (Jules Porges, Julius Wernher, and Alfred Beit) to Wernher, Beit, & Co. (Julius Wernher, Alfred Beit, and Max Michaelis).


BEIT, ALFRED (1853-1906), financier and benefactor, born at Hamburg on 15 Feb. 1853, was eldest son of Siegfried and Laura Beit. The father was a merchant belonging to a well-known Hamburg family, Jewish by race, Lutheran by religion. 'I was one of the poor Beits of Hamburg,' the son once said, implying that another branch was better off than his own. Beit was educated privately, and at seventeen entered the Hamburg office of a firm of South African merchants, D. Lippert & Co., his kinsmen. With a view to qualifying to act as a representative of the branch of this firm, just extended from Port Elizabeth to Kimberley at the diamond mining centre in Griqualand West, Cape Colony, Beit spent 1874 at Amsterdam, where he obtained a knowledge of the diamond trade at first hand. Early in September 1875 he sailed for Cape Town, and proceeding to Kimberley by waggon was one of Lippert's representatives there until 1878, when he revisited Hamburg. His Amsterdam training enabled him to see that Cape diamonds, so far from deserving their current repute of being an inferior product, were generally as good as any in the world, and were being sold in Africa at a price far below their worth in Europe. Accordingly borrowing 2000l. from his father by way of capital, he returned to Kimberley in the same year, and set up under his own name as a diamond merchant. Foreseeing the growth of Kimberley, he is said to have invested most of his capital in purchasing ground on which he put up a number of corrugated iron offices. For twelve of these the rent ultimately received by him was estimated at 1800l. a month, and later he is believed to have sold the ground for 260,000l.

In 1882 he became associated in the diamond business at Kimberley with J. Porges and Julius Wernher. The latter, who was created a baronet in 1905, was a young Hessian who, having fought in the Franco-German war, had come out to South Africa as a qualified architect and surveyor. In 1884 Porges and Wernher returned to England and constituted the London firm of J. Porges & Co. dealing in diamonds and diamond shares, and after 1888 in gold mines as well. Beit was sole representative of this firm at Kimberley until July 1888, when he made London his headquarters, although his subsequent visits to Africa were frequent. On 1 Jan. 1890 the firm of Wernher, Beit & Co. replaced J. Porges & Co., in the same line of business.

When settled at Kimberley, Beit made the acquaintance of Cecil John Rhodes, and while close business relations followed he felt the full force of Rhodes's personality. Yielding to its fascination, he became his intimate friend, accepting his ideas and aspirations with enthusiasm. He soon joined Rhodes on the board of the original De Beers Diamond Company (founded in 1880) and played an important part in Rhodes's great scheme of the amalgamation of the chief diamond mines of Kimberley as De Beers Consolidated Mines. The scheme took effect in 1888 after Beit had advanced to Rhodes without security a sum of 250,000l. Under Rhodes's influence, Beit, who had become a naturalised British subject, thoroughly assimilated, despite his foreign birth, the patriotic spirit of British imperialism, and was in politics as all else a strenuous supporter of Rhodes. His association with Rhodes became the chief interest of his life. The two men rendered each other the best kind of mutual assistance. Without Beit, Rhodes was puzzled, or at least wearied, with the details of business, Without Rhodes, Beit might have been a mere successful gold and diamond merchant.

Meanwhile the gold-mining activity in the Transvaal Republic, which first began at Barberton in 1884, had spread to the conglomerate formation of Witwatersrand, familiarly known as the Rand, where Johannesburg now stands. The Rand was declared a public goldfield on 20 September 1886. Early in 1888 Beit paid it a visit, and before leaving Kimberley he arranged provisionally that Hermann Eckstein should establish a branch of his firm on the Rand, trading as H. Eckstein— later H. Eckstein & Co. To the development of the Transvaal gold-mines Beit signally contributed. Perceiving the possibilities of the Witwatersrand, he acquired a large interest in the best of the outcrop mines, which soon became valuable properties. But his chief stroke was made in 1891, when he revisited South Africa and illustrated bis characteristic perception of possibilities. Adopting the suggestion, in face of much expert scepticism, that it might be possible not only to work the outcrop but to strike the slanting reef by deep level shafts, at some distance away from the outcrop, he evolved, and devoted capital to testing, the Great Deep Level scheme. Beit was the first to recognise the importance of employing first-class mining engineers. With their aid he proved the scheme to be practicable, and to its success the subsequent prosperity of the Rand is chiefly due. In the whole deep level system Beit's firm were forerunners and creators; other firms followed later in their footsteps.

Beit was deeply interested in the scheme of northern expansion which Rhodes had formed early in his South African career. On the formation (24 Oct. 1889) of the British South Africa Company for the administration of the extensive territory afterwards known as Rhodesia, Beit became an original director. He first visited the country in 1891, entering the country by the old Tuli route, and travelling by Victoria to Hartley. He joined later the boards of the various Rhodesian railway companies. His loyal support of Rhodes had its penalties. Like all who had a great stake in the Transvaal, he sympathised with the reform movement in Johannesburg of 1895 and shared the general impatience with the rule of President Kruger. Beit was concerned with Rhodes in placing Dr. (later Sir) Starr Jameson with an armed force on the Transvaal border (Dec. 1895). After nebulous intrigue with Johannesburg there followed the raid into the Transvaal. Beit's share in this blunder cost him 200,000l. Censured for his part in the transaction by the British South Africa committee of the House of Commons in 1897, he resigned his directorship of the Chartered Company, although the committee relieved him of any suspicion that he acted from an unworthy financial motive. During the South African war of 1899-1902 he spent immense sums on the imperial light horse and on the equipment of the imperial yeomanry, and before and after the war he poured money into land settlement, immigration, and kindred schemes for the development of South Africa.

Meanwhile Beit pursued other interests than politics or commerce. With a genuine love of beautiful things he formed from 1888 onwards, under the guidance of Dr. Bode, director of the Berlin Museum, a fine collection of pictures and works of art, including Italian Renaissance bronzes. He finally housed these treasures in a mansion in Park Lane, which Eustace Balfour built for him in 1895. Of painting he had a thorough knowledge, and among his pictures were the 'Prodigal Son' series of Murillo, six pictures acquired from Lord Dudley's Gallery, and many of the finest examples of the Dutch and English schools.

On Rhodes's death in March 1902 Beit succeeded to much of his friend's position. He became the chief figure on the boards of the De Beers Company and of the Chartered Company, which he rejoined in that year. He was also one of Rhodes's trustees under his will. In all these capacities he faithfully endeavoured to do what Rhodes would have done. His health had long been feeble, and in the autumn of 1902, when he visited South Africa for the purpose of examining—with admirable results in the future—the organisation of Rhodesia, he had a stroke of paralysis at Johannesburg. Through Dr. Jameson's skill he rallied, but never recovered. But his interests were unslackened. He identified himself with the movements for a better understanding with Germany and for tariff reform. He bore witness to his enlightened colonial interests by founding at Oxford in 1905 the Beit professorship of colonial history and the Beit assistant lectureship in colonial history, besides giving a sum of money to the Bodleian Library for additions to its collections of books on colonial history. In the early spring of 1906 he was sent to Wiesbaden on account of heart trouble. By his own wish he was brought home to England, a dying man, and passed away at his country residence, Tewin Water in Hertfordshire, on 16 July. He was buried in the churchyard there.

Beit, who was unmarried, was survived by his mother, two sisters, and his younger brother Otto, and while providing liberally for various relatives and friends he left the residue of his fortune to his brother. At the same time his public benefactions, amounting in value to 2,000,000l., were impressive alike by their generosity to England and Germany, and by their breadth of view. To the Imperial College of Technology, London, was allotted 50,000l. in cash and De Beers shares, valued at the testator's death at 84,843l. 15s. To Rhodesia, for purposes of education and charity, 200,000l. was bequeathed to be administered by trustees. King Edward's Hospital Fund and the trustees of Guy's Hospital were left 20,000l. eaoh. Rhodes University at Grahamstown received 25,000l., Rhodes Memorial Fund 10,000l., and the Union Jack Club, London, 10,000l. Funds for benefactions in the Transvaal, in Kimberley, and the Cape Colony were also established. Two sums of 20,000l. were left to his executors for distribution to the charities of London and Hamburg respectively. Finally 1,200,000l. passed to trustees for the extension of railway and telegraph communication in South Africa, with a view to forwarding the enterprise known as the Cape to Cairo railway. With admirable sagacity Beit made his public bequests elastic. Thus, while bequeathing an estate at Hamburg as a pleasure-ground to the people of that city, he provided that twenty years later Hamburg might realise the estate and apply the proceeds to such other public objects as might seem desirable. Two of the bequests— 200,000l. for a university at Johannesburg and 50,000l. destined for an Institute of Medical Sciences—lapsed into the residuary estate owing to the schemes in question being abandoned, but Mr. Otto Beit intimated his intention of devoting the 200,000l. to university education in South Africa, and the 50,000l. was made by him the nucleus of a fund of 215,000l., with .which he founded in 1909 thirty Alfred Beit fellowships for medical research in memory of the testator. Beit also left to the National Gallery the picture known as 'Lady Cockburn and her Children,' by Sir Joshua Reynolds; and to the Kaiserliche Museum in Berlin another by Sir Joshua, 'Mrs. Boone and her Daughter,' together with his bronze statue 'Hercules' by Pollaiuolo. His large Majolica plate from the service of Isabella d'Este was bequeathed to the Hamburg Museum.

A wealthy financier of abnormal intuition and power of memory, combined with German thoroughness of method, Beit had nothing in common with the financial magnate. He was no speculator in any ordinary sense, acquiring property whether on the Rand or elsewhere solely with the object of seriously developing it. He did not gamble, and advice on speculative investments which he always gave reluctantly was far from infallible. Shy and retiring to excess, he was devoid of social ambition, and was little known beyond a small circle of intimates who included men in the high position of Lord Rosebery and Lord Haldane. An active sympathy with every form of suffering and an ardent belief in great causes led him to distribute vast sums of money, but his benefactions were always made privately with rare selfeffacement. He was the target through life for much undeserved abuse. The terms of the will give the true measure of his character.

A statue was unveiled at Salisbury, Rhodesia, on 11 May 1911.

[Personal knowledge; private information from, among others, Mr. Otto Beit, Sir Julius Wernher, Bart., and Sir Starr Jameson; Sir Lewis Michcll, Life of Cecil Rhodes; The Times, 17 July and 21 July 1906 (account of will).] C. W. B.


Source: Dictionary of National Biography - 1912

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 28, 2016 11:34 am

Vice Consul Samuel W. Honaker at Johannesburg, British South Africa, reports that clocks and watches valued at $18,336 were imported into Southern Rhodesia in 1916, and $16,668 in 1917; jewelry valued at $31,676 in 1916, and $33,808 in 1917. Exports from Southern Rhodesia include diamonds to the value of $31,215 in 1916, and $15,486 in 1917.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 18th December 1918

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 29, 2016 5:36 am

A Relic of the Prince Imperial.—Last month, Messrs. M. F. Dent, of 33, Cockspur Street, identified the back of a gold watch case as belonging to a watch of their construction that was made for the Empress Eugenie, in 1878, for her son, the Prince Imperial. It has on it a Crown and the initial N. It is slightly battered, and was purchased about six years ago by a customer of Messrs. Weill & Harburg, of 3, Holborn Circus, at Kimberley, from a Zulu.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 2nd July 1888

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu May 26, 2016 4:56 am

SOUTH AFRICAN MINT - SUID-AFRIKAANSE MUNT

Pretoria


An example of the work and mark of the South African Mint (Suid-Afrikaanse Munt):

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Lion's head in U - STG - G (1954) - S·A·M

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 12, 2016 5:58 am

Parliamentary Regalia of the Orange River Colony

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The Parliamentary regalia of the Orange River Colony consists of a mace with its fittings, a black rod, badges, to be worn by the messengers of both Houses, and a set of four ballot boxes.

The mace, of solid silver richly gilt, is modeled on the historic one installed in the House of Commons during the reign of Charles II. The vase-shaped head bears, in panels, the rose, thistle, harp and the arms of the Orange River Colony, with the initials E. R. The back rod, of ebony with rich mounts, the upper one of which is of 22 karat gold, is an exact replica of the black rod in the House of Lords. It carries a sovereign of the year 1906 embedded in the lower band.

The badges to be worn by the messengers are of solid silver gilt, and distinctive in character. The chief messenger of the upper house bears the royal arms suspended by an oval link chain and having as pendant a replica of the black rod surrounded by the garter. The messengers of the lower house bear the royal arms suspended by a chain and having the figure of Mercury as pendants.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 5th February 1908

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 04, 2016 10:09 am

PATRICK MAVROS

Mpata Farm, Haslemere Lane, Umwinsidale, Harare


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An example of the work and mark of the Zimbabwean silversmith, Patrick Mavros:

Monkey and Palm Swizzle Stick:

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PM - Zimbabwean national mark

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PM - Zimbabwean national mark


The mark of Patrick Mavros is also registered with the London Assay Office.

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Also located at: 104–106 Fulham Road, London - Bhugeloo Building, Royal Road, Terre Rouge, Mauritius - 284, The Village Market, Gigiri, Nairobi

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 23, 2017 1:32 pm

NORMAN WATSON

16, Fenton Road, Durban


Examples of the marks of Norman Watson of Durban:

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The 'Boy on horseback' mark is the trade mark of Norman Watson. The mark is a representation of Dick King who rode from Durban to Grahamstown to carry the message that Durban was being attacked by the Boers.

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 27, 2017 3:23 pm

SOUTH AFRICAN GOLDWARE

Johannesburg


Examples of work and marks of South African Goldware:

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SAG - Protea - SILVER - 925


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S·A·G - Protea - SILVER


South African Goldware was active during the 1950's/1960's period.

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon May 01, 2017 2:19 pm

......Another measure which promised to harry the jewellery industry, was one providing for the hall-marking here of all jewellery, whether imported or of local manufacture, it met with much opposition from the jewellers and goldsmiths, and was ultimately shelved for a year.

Source: The Argus Annual and South African Gazetteer - 1895

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Jul 09, 2017 3:05 pm

American Jewelry, Etc., in South Africa

A commendable movement is on foot among the American residents of South Africa, which comprehends the holding of an American exhibition in one of the principal towns in Cape Colony about November next year. The scheme is as yet only in embryo, but the chief feature of the idea is that a handsome permanent building be erected, to be called the “ American Palace,” where a representative display of American products and manufactures would be on view, in somewhat the same manner as the British colonies are represented at the Imperial Institute. The idea comprehends, however, the erection of temporary structures in addition to the palace, and in fact everything that is generally understood by an exhibition. The idea has found much favor among the American merchants in South Africa, and with the American Consul, C. H. Benedict, and the initial expenses of the project have been guaranteed. We consider the fruition of the scheme will prove of advantage to the participators in it, among whom should be clock, watch, silver plated ware and jewelry manufacturers of the United States. A collective exhibit, after the nature of that of the New England Manufacturing Jewelers’ Association, at the World’s Fair, but comprising the above lines should, we think, be a practical and profitable undertaking.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 24th April 1895

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 21, 2017 4:52 am

To Acquire Trade in South Africa

The Circular, a few weeks ago, announced to the trade that an American Exhibition had been planned to take place in South Africa, and urged
manufacturers of jewelry, clocks, watches, silverware, etc., to investigate the matter. The South African American Exhibition will be held in November, 1896, ostensibly for the benefit of American manufacturers and merchants, who, the promoters of the enterprise say, have much to gain, as the markets of South Africa have not yet been properly exploited by American business men, and that country bids fair to become “ the land of the future.” The following copy of a circular letter received from the secretary of the exhibition will be read with interest:

SOUTH AFRICAN AMERICAN EXHIBITION

To Manufacturers, etc.:

Several South African merchants, American and otherwise, together with our local consul, have discussed the idea of an American Exhibition to be held in South Africa during November, 1896 (our Spring, your Fall), at some city to be subsequently decided upon, and we should be glad to know if your firm would be desirous of being represented thereat. The enormous strides made by this country during the last few years have been most remarkable, and such a scheme, if properly worked out, would form an unrivalled advertisement which would be noticed by the whole of South Africa and not confined to any one place, and as this is pre-eminently the land of the future, is well worthy of your attention. On behalf of the Provisional Committee I should be pleased to supply you with any statistics or information generally as to the country’s resources and trade, and arrangements would be made for a special low freight rate.

Before submitting a draft prospectus the feeling of manufacturers and merchants in America towards such a project is being tested, and I trust to hear favorably from you per return, and that your price lists will be sent to the American Society of South Africa therewith.

Yours truly,
I. F. Webner.
P. O. Box 429, Cape Town. South Africa, April, 1895.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 15th May 1895

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 06, 2017 1:07 pm

THE MACE OF THE RHODESIAN PARLIAMENT

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Source: Southern Rhodesia 1890 - 1950 - Rhodesian Graphic - 1950

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 21, 2017 12:56 pm

L. PINN & Co.

45, Adderley Street, Cape Town


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L. Pinn & Co. - Cape Town - 1909

Established in 1893.

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Oct 26, 2017 4:53 am

GEORGE FINDLAY & Co.

Adderley Street and Parliament Street, Cape Town


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Geo. Findlay & Co. - Cape Town - 1909

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Simba Jewellery Pretoria

Postby JanGroen » Wed Nov 01, 2017 12:39 pm

Good day
I just wanted to share this old advert that I found in a mammal guide for Kruger Park from 1968. It is a small advert for Simba, a South African Silversmith. They made animal and Africa inspired brooches, spoons and other souvenirs.
Groete
Jannie

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 07, 2017 1:35 pm

McCALLUM BADGE Cc.

396, Voortrekker Road, Maitland, Cape Town


An example of the work and mark of McCallum Badge Cc.:

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McCallum - Box 1016 - Cape Town


See: viewtopic.php?f=18&t=49053&p=148990#p148990

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Re: Early South African Silversmiths

Postby JanGroen » Wed Dec 06, 2017 9:31 am

dognose wrote:WILLIAM CAIE

Jeweller and Watchmaker Abercorn Street, Bulawayo, Southern Rhodesia.

Our review of the commerce and industry of Bulawayo must include the business of Mr. William Caie, which illustrates in a very efficient manner the various branches of skilled work connected with the watchmaking and jewellery trade. His attractive establishment in Abercorn Street is handsomely appointed, and every advantage is taken of its equipment to display in a tasteful and methodical manner the wealth of beautiful articles comprising his stock. We know that "all that glitters is not gold," but here we have the glitter which proceeds from the genuine article, and the bright and well-ordered interior of the shop is the casket in which a large number of gems and precious materials are kept.

The increasing production and cheapening of watches is one of the commercial phenomena, and the enormous variety of their designs and qualities find demonstration in the extensive assortment which Mr. Caie holds, ranging from splendid articles within the reach of the poorest member of the community to most valuable specimens that only the wealthy can purchase. We may here mention that Mr. Caie is agent for the celebrated Waltham watches.

The glittering exhibition of brooches, of which we noticed several souvenir specimens made up with gold quartz obtained from the various mines in the country, bracelets, pins, rings, &c., is particularly interesting, and diamonds, rubies, sapphires, emeralds, opals, and other precious stones sparkle and glisten with everchanging fire as the visitor moves about the shop. Magnificent presentation plate of all kinds is also to be seen, while the collection of clocks should be viewed by anyone ' desirous of obtaining something out of the common–a timekeeper that will not only faithfully record the passing minutes and hours, but will combine these novel and ornamental features which the leading manufacturers are ever striving to exemplify in their best productions.

Passing through the shop we enter the gilding and electro-plating department, which is equipped with the latest appliances pertaining to this branch of the business. During our inspection of this department (which is under the able management of Mr. George Joss), we noticed a very fine and complicated piece of mechanism for the rolling of metals; also a blasting machine for frosting. Leaving here we pass into the watch-repairing shop, which is in the able hands of Mr. Thos. Forbes, and is resplendent with all the latest appliances necessary for the repairing of the most elaborate timepieces.

The business, which is under the personal supervision of Mr. Caie, was established in 1902, and has won golden opinions for the able manner in which it is conducted.


Source: Southern Rhodesia: An Account of its Past History, Present Development, Natural Riches, and Future Prospects: With special particulars for intending settlers, numerous illustrations and much general information - South African Publishing Syndicate - 1907



Detail of Thomas Forbes, who is mentioned in the above article:

MR. THOMAS FORBES

As his name suggests, is a Scotchman, and was born at Alford, near Aberdeen, in the year 1879. Receiving a liberal education in the town of his birth, he served his apprenticeship with Mr. John Watt, watchmaker, of Alford. Proceeding to Peterhead in 1901, he was for two years with Mr. Stephen, watchmaker and jeweller, of that town, and later went to Messrs. James Smith and Son, of Aberdeen. Leaving Scotland in 1905, Mr. Forbes came to Cape Town, and proceeding to Bulawayo, arrived in that town on the 12th April, when he joined the well-known firm of Mr. William Caie, one of the leading watchmakers and jewellers in the town, in which establishment he holds the position of head of the watch and clock repairing department. Mr. Forbes is an enthusiastic rifle shot; is a member of the Bulawayo Rifle Club and the Southern Rhodesia Volunteers in both of which he is popular and greatly respected.

Source: Southern Rhodesia: An Account of its Past History, Present Development, Natural Riches, and Future Prospects: With special particulars for intending settlers, numerous illustrations and much general information - South African Publishing Syndicate - 1907


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Caie - Bulawayo - 1912

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Good day

I have found this jewelry box that I think could be related to T. Forbes mentioned here.

Jannie

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 06, 2017 9:47 am

Hi Jannie,

Nice find. Thanks for sharing this with us.

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 14, 2017 5:31 am

African Beans Used in Jewelry

Of interest to the jewelry industry is the information concerning a new material suitable for carving and turning, communicated through the German commercial museum. According to this statement, at the opening of the railroad from Buluwayo to the Victoria Falls of the Zambesi tourists brought back with them, as souvenirs, two kinds of beans hitherto but little known. One of them, as large as a pea, is of a very beautiful scarlet red color and black ; the other is a bean as large as a hazelnut, black, with a bright red cap.

The tourists had these beans transformed by Cape Town jewelers into scarf pins and brooches and hat pins, and the idea was at once seized upon by a wire worker, who started the manufacture of ornaments, in which the beans were used, on a large scale. The very attractive-looking novelties found numerous admirers, and have become an article in large demand in all South African jewelry stores.

The beans may be obtained from several firms in Cape Town.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd February 1910

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Re: South African and Rhodesian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 13, 2018 3:07 pm

J. JOSEPH & SONS

9, Main Street, Port Elizabeth


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J. Joseph & Sons - Port Elizabeth - 1897

Jewellers by special appointment to His Excellency Sir A. Milner, K.C.B.


The business of Joseph Joseph and Maurice Joseph.

Established in 1872.

J. Joseph & Sons supplied the gold, silver and bronze medals awarded by the Grahamstown Exhibition.

The business was noted as having 20 employees in 1927.


PORT ELIZABETH

Messrs J. Joseph and Sons have presented the Red House Swimming Club with a silver challenge trophy. The shield is handsome, and is a fine specimen of workmanship.


Source: The Jewish World - 22nd April 1898

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