Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

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Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Jul 16, 2009 2:32 am

Tiffany & Co. Advertisment from 1860.

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Last edited by dognose on Thu Feb 04, 2010 6:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby dognose » Tue Jan 19, 2010 3:00 pm

Trade advert from 1919.

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Postby dognose » Thu Feb 04, 2010 6:14 pm

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1902
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Postby wev » Thu Feb 04, 2010 7:55 pm

From the American Illustrated Biography, 1852
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Postby dognose » Sat Feb 06, 2010 10:05 am

A two page advert for Tiffany containing a fine descripton of the inside of their New York store, taken from a Cunard shipping line brochure of 1877.

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Postby dognose » Mon Feb 08, 2010 10:19 am

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1907

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Ads.

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 06, 2010 5:09 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1907

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Ads.

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 22, 2010 1:29 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1896

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1896

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Ads.

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 25, 2010 12:25 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1910

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Ads.

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 13, 2010 7:42 am

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Tiffany & Co./Tiffany, Reed & Co. - New York/Paris - 1862

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1894

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1899

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1905

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1907

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Ads.

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 26, 2011 1:48 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - London - 1905

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Ads.

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 21, 2013 10:14 am

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Colgate & Co. - 1906

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Ads.

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 11, 2013 7:21 am

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1888


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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1890

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 13, 2013 11:27 am

In the quiet secluded locality of Argyle Place, have existed for a long time the offices of Messrs. Tiffany, the great American jewelers. Here, unknown to the majority of retailers, they have from time to time been visited by the largest wholesale houses and diamond merchants, from whose stocks have been selected the things which they considered most suitable for the American market. From such a state of things jewelers had nothing to fear, as practically no retail business was done, and, although Americans visiting this country often inquired after Tiffany's store, no one could direct them to it. Now, however, things are changed, and the American store is now located in Regent-street, where a retail trade will be carried on. We think the trade do not at present realize what a difference that will make to many houses, especially those who do business with Americans, as our cousins think such an almighty lot of Tiffany.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st July 1891

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 02, 2013 3:33 am

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1908

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 19, 2013 4:56 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1917

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 21, 2013 2:15 pm

Biography of Charles Lewis Tiffany:


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TIFFANY, Charles Lewis, founder and head of the firm of Tiffany & Company, New York city, was born in Danielsonville, Connecticut, February 15, 1812, son of Comfort T. and Chloe (Draper) Tiffany. He is the sixth generation from Squire Humphrey Tiffany, of England, and his ancestors for several generations were residents of Massachusetts. Comfort Tiffany moved to Danielsonville to engage in the manufacture of cotton goods, and the son's first training was in his father's cotton mill and country store, but in 1837 came to New York city to join his former schoolmate, John B. Young. On September 18, 1837, tne fifm of Tiffany & Young was formed, Comfort Tiffany, father of Charles L. Tiffany, advancing one thousand dollars to the young men. With this modest capital, and in the midst of the worst commercial crisis this country has experienced, Tiffany & Young opened their fancy goods and stationery store, in the lower part of the old-fashioned dwelling house that then stood at 259, Broadway. Their first three days' sales amounted to four dollars and eighty-nine cents. Yet gradually the business increased, and in 1841 the adjoining store on the corner of Warren street was rented. Mr. Tiffany early saw the artistic and commercial value of Chinese and Japanese goods, and was the first dealer to introduce them and give them prominence in New York. In addition the firm carried a stock of umbrellas, walking-sticks, cabinets, jars, pottery, and curiosities. Gradually the scope of the business widened, and Bohemian glass, French and Dresden porcelain, cutlery, clocks, and fancy Parisian jewelry were added to the stock in the order named. In 1847 the expanding needs of the business required its removal to 271 Broadway. J. L. Ellis was then admitted to partnership, and the firm style became Tiffany, Young & Ellis, one member going abroad to purchase goods. In 1848 the firm began the manufacture of jewelry on their own account. Their exquisite designs and careful workmanship at once attracted attention and brought them the highest class of custom trade. Diamond jewelry, watches, clocks, silver-ware, and bronzes now became the leading articles of their stock. In 1848 the firm purchased a large consignment of diamonds in Paris, where prices had depreciated owing to political disturbances. The sale of the stones netted them a handsome profit. Again in 1887, at the sale of the crown jewels in Paris, the firm purchased one-third of the entire quantity, or five hundred thousand dollars' worth, probably one of the largest single purchases of precious gems ever made. In 1850 Gideon F. T. Reed, one of Boston's prominent jewellers, was admitted to partnership, and immediately afterwards the Paris house was established at 79 Rue Richelieu, under the firm style of Tiffany, Reed & Company, the new member of the firm acting as resident partner. Since Mr. Reed's retirement the house has been known as Tiffany & Company, and is now located Avenue de l'Opera, 36 bis. The Paris house has been a great aid to the firm, and has enabled it to take advantage of fluctuations in price, at the same time building up a distinguished clientage of its own. The list of royal patrons is a long one, and includes representatives of every European court. One of the firm's specialties is the making of special presentation pieces in silver. Tiffany & Company were the first in this country to adopt the English standard of fineness in their productions of sterling silver, that of 925-1000 fine. Their original and artistic designs in silver have received distinguished recognition at every World's Fair, having been awarded the Grand Prix at both of the Paris Expositions, of 1878 and 1891 ; and at the Exposition in Chicago in 1893 fifty-six awards were made to the firm. This department, under the direction of E. C. Moore, now deceased, grew from a small shop on Prince street until almost an entire block was occupied, and five hundred skilled metal-workers are employed. Finally, having exhausted all opportunities for further expansion in that locality, a new site was selected at Forest Hill, Newark, New Jersey, and here, in 1897, the firm completed and now occupy a new factory with over two hundred thousand square feet of floor space, and equipped with the latest improvements and appliances for manufacturing silverware. In all other departments the growth of the business has been marked, and that same artistic excellence and careful workmanship have been retained which for more than a generation have made Tiffany & Company the foremost jewellers of this country. Through all this period Charles L. Tiffany has been the actual head of the firm, and by his force of character, executive ability, accurate judgement, and rare good taste has won for himself honor, reputation, and a business success such as few Americans have achieved. Messrs. Young and Ellis retired from the firm in 1853, new partners were admitted, and from that date the firm style of Tiffany & Company has been continued. In 1854 the business was moved to 550 Broadway, and in 1861 the adjoining building was leased. During the war Mr. Tiffany was a loyal Union man, and his store became a large depot for military supplies. In 1868 the business was incorporated, Mr. Tiffany becoming President and Treasurer, Mr. Reed Vice-President, Charles T. Cook General Superintendent and Assistant Treasurer, and George McClure Secretary. Mr. Reed retired in 1875 and Mr. Cook succeeded him as Vice-President. The latter's connection with this house dates back to 1847, when he began work at the age of twelve. Since the incorporation of the company much of the responsibility of management has fallen upon his shoulders, and Mr. Tiffany has great confidence in his judgement and ability. The London branch of Tiffany & Company was started in 1868. In 1870 the present building in Union square occupied by the firm was erected, and at about the same time the manufacture of electro plated silver-ware was begun at Newark. Mr. Tiffany's admirable qualities of head and heart have made him universally esteemed. He is a member of the Union League Club, of which he was one of the founders. He has always been a liberal patron of the arts and sciences, and is a member of the National Academy of Design, the New York Society of Fine Arts, the American Geographical Society, and the New York Historical Society; and was one of the founders of the New York Society of Fine Arts, taking an active interest, too, in the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the American Museum of Natural History. His financial strength and sound business judgement have made him in demand as a Director, in which capacity he serves in the Bank of the Metropolis, Pacific Bank, American Surety Company, and State Trust Company. He is also a member of the Chamber of Commerce. He has never mingled in politics, but has been content with honors which a phenomenal business success has won for him. When in 1878 his firm was awarded the Grand Prize at the Paris Exposition, Mr. Tiffany was created Chevalier of the National Legion of Honor, while he has also been the recipient from the Czar of Russia of the Gold Medal, Praemia Digno, a rare distinction. Mr. Tiffany was married in New York, November 30, 1841, to Miss Harriet O. A. Young. This union brought them six children, of whom four are living: Annie Olivia (Mrs. Alfred Mitchell), Louis C., Louise H., and Burnett Y. Tiffany. Mr. Tiffany's wife, his life's companion, for over fifty-six years, died in her eighty-first year, on November 16, 1897.

Source: Men Of Progress - 1898

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 20, 2013 1:04 pm

TIFFANY STERLING SILVER MARKS


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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1906


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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1906

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 30, 2014 2:29 pm

JAMES ROOKE

James Rooke, a former silversmith, died recently in the Church Charity Foundation Home for the Aged. At the time of his death, Mr. Rooke was 71 years of age, and before his retirement was employed by Tiffany & Co. Deceased is survived by a widow.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 26th November 1919

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu May 01, 2014 8:25 am

HARRY MARSHALL

Harry Marshall

Harry W. Marshall, 76, 5646, 16th Ave. N. Died Friday (Dec. 8, 1967). Born in Newark, N.J., he came here years ago from Pittsburgh. He was a retired silversmith employed at Tiffanys in New York City, a member of the Palm Lake Christian Church, was a WWI and WWII veteran, a member of the Sunshine Barracks 261 Veterans of World War I. He is survived by his wife, Ella C.; daughter, Mrs Merle Silvis of Bethel Park, PA; two sisters, Mrs Frances Huff and Mrs Edith Fisher, both of St. Petersburg; and two grandchildren. C.E. Prevatt Memorial Home, Tyrone Chapel, is in charge.


Source: The Evening Independent - 9th December 1967

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