Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 16, 2018 1:46 pm

Salt and peppers from Tiffany & Co.:

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TIFFANY & Co - STERLING

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 27, 2018 4:55 am

Death of Charles C. Proctor

Boston, Mass., June 5 —Charles C. Proctor died at the residence of his son, on Massachusetts Ave., June 1st, after a long illness from Bright’s disease. Mr. Proctor was born in this city June 16, 1845. His father was Eli Proctor, who was a pioneer native American precious stone cutter. After graduating from the public schools he entered his father’s shop and there learned the rudiments of the trade of stone cutting. He afterwards went to Amsterdam, where he remained for five years, being apprenticed to some of the most noted diamond cutters in Holland.

On his return to the United States he was engaged by Tiffany & Co., New York, and had been in their employ up to five years ago, when he retired from active business and has been living with his son since. Mr. Proctor was perhaps one of the leading experts on precious stones in this country. He had been sent on special commissions to India and other foreign countries a number of times to search for stones. For some years past he had been more or less of an invalid, and last year made a trip to Europe for his health, returning in December. Since that time he had been steadily declining, and his death was expected at any moment.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 12th June 1895

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri May 11, 2018 5:37 am

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1860

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun May 27, 2018 12:21 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1904

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:15 am

BANK FRAUDS

DARING AND SUCCESSFUL TACTICS


A daring fraud has just been perpetrated by a man named Naudorff on the American banking firm of Morgan, Harjes, and Co., 31, Boulevard Haussman. Naudorff lived in furnished apartments in the Rue d'Anjou. On Tuesday last he took into his employment a young man, whom he sent to the offices of the above firm with a letter purporting to be signed by the confidential clerk of Messrs Tiffany and Co., the American jewellers, of 36 bis, Avenue de l'Opera. The lad, to whom Naudorff represented himself to be Messrs Tiffany's confidential clerk, brought back a cheque book. On the following day he was again sent to the bank to cash a cheque for 23,000 francs, and on Thursday a cheque for 35,000 francs. He received the money and handed it to Naudorff, whom he met by appointment at Messrs Tiffany's establishment. On each occasion Naudorff was in the act of descending the staircase at Messrs Tiffany's, and after receiving the money he sent the lad to his lodgings at the Rue d'Anjou, there to address wrappers. On Friday, when the lad arrived as usual at the Rue d'Anjou, he was told that his employer had left on a journey. He promptly proceeded to Messrs Tiffany's, where he was informed that there was no confidential clerk of the name of Naudorff in their employment. On hearing that cheques had been cashed in the firm's name, Mr Tiffany went at once to the offices of Messrs Morgan, Harjes, and Co., and was there shown a letter signed apparently by his confidential clerk, the signature being remarkably well imitated. The letter bore the customary heading of Messrs Tiffany and Co. Mr Tiffany was also shown the two cheques which had been cashed. They bore not only the signature of the confidential clerk, but the stamp of the firm. An active search is being made for Naudorff, who has disappeared.-Reuter.


Source: South Wales Echo - 24th February 1896

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 03, 2018 12:05 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1910

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 06, 2018 4:38 am

Tiffany & Co., the well known jewelers of New York City, with works at Forest Hill, Newark, N.J., are now refining their own platinum scrap and wastes, having recently installed a complete plant for this purpose.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - June 1911

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 18, 2018 4:24 am

Many employes at Tiffany & Co.’s silver works at Forest Hill, N. J., last week received certificates showing that they had contributed to the McKinley Memorial Fund. When the association made its request at the Tiffany works for contributions to the fund almost every employe responded. The certificate was engraved at Tiffany’s.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st February 1905

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 11, 2018 3:13 am

A large force of men are now employed on the new factories of Tiffany & Co., at Forest Hill, which are progressing rapidly. Tiffany & Co. have recently purchased another large tract of land adjoining their present site, and it is understood their intention is to ultimately remove their entire manufacturing plant to Forest Hill.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 30th November 1892

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Jul 12, 2018 4:28 am

The beautiful sterling silver vase recently completed and shipped abroad by Messrs. Tiffany and Company for Mr. Albrecht Padenstecher of New York was offered as a prize to the men's singing societies of Germany, competed for at a modern “Meistersinger” contest held a fortnight ago at Frankfort-am-Main. The German emperor originated this contest and gave the principal prize. Now it is often said that music hath charms to sooth the savage, etc., but in this particular case this particular vase at this particular festival has raised a great deal of discord. The Kaiser's admiration for the Tiffany vase, on which those two strenuous men, Emperor William and President Roosevelt, are portrayed, is so great as to have made bad blood among Berlin silversmiths. They resent his majesty's declaration that such work cannot be done in Germany. William received, the other day, a deputation of complaining jewelers, and said in his brusque manner, “I will give you one more chance. If you fail, I will order my trophies in New York in future.” Now it is up to the Berlin silversmiths to prove their title clear to the term “silversmiths to the Kaiser,” or perchance see on the silver of Kaiser's silverware the Tiffany stamp, proclaiming that it was “made in America.”

Source: Boston Home Journal - 27th June 1903

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 20, 2018 5:15 am

The world-renowned jeweler, Charles L. Tiffany, head of the house of Tiffany & Co., celebrated his 77th birthday on February 14. After over 50 years in the harness he shows phenomenal vitality. His step is as elastic and his eye as bright as a young man's of thirty-five. He is one of the last to leave his establishment at night. Truly, this is the age of phenomenal old men, men so active and capable of business that it seems almost discourteous to call them old.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - March 1889

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 20, 2018 9:18 am

THE TRANSPORTATION VASE

A testimonial to Chief Willard A. Smith, which perpetuates in solid silver the famous Golden Gate of the Transportation Building at the World’s Fair.


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Messrs. Tiffany & Co., New York, have just completed and contributed to the history of the World’s Columbian Exposition an art work in solid silver which perpetuates in this costly metal the marvelous architecture and the pictures of the exhibits of one of the most interesting buildings at the World’s Columbian Exposition. This art work is in the form of a testimonial vase, presented by prominent American exhibitors to Willard A. Smith, Chief of the Department of Transportation Exhibits.

The vase stands 24 inches high and measures 42 inches in circumference. The Grecian form has been employed for a background, and upon this the artist has presented an allegorical representation by etching, carving and chiseling pictures of those exhibits in the Transportation building which illustrate the various stages and progress in modes of transportation by land and water; but by far the most interesting part is the reproduction of the famous Golden Door of the building which faced the lagoon at the Fair. This is a perfect piece of work; it measures 10½ inches across the foundation and stands 5¾ inches high, and within this space is reproduced every detail in the series of golden arches—the frieze work, the Moorish kiosks on either side, and the quotations from Bacon and Macaulay which have become familiar to the millions who entered the building:

There be three things which make a nation great and prosperous. A fertile soil, busy workshops and easy conveyances for men and goods from place to place.—Bacon.

Of all inventions, the alphabet and the printing-press alone excepted, those inventions which abridge distance have done most for civilization. —Macaulay.

Below the golden door, circling round the lower part of the vase, are ten panels; they tell the history of transportation on land, in etched pictures of the vehicles used at different periods, in various countries, beginning with the Turkish sedan chair, 1775; Indian traveau, 1785; Lapland dog sledge, 1800; Mexican cart, 1810; dandy horse, 1810; Conestoga wagon; stage¬coach, 1825; John Bull train, 1831; Cooper train, 1831, and Dewitt Clinton train, 1831.

Dividing the panels are winged female figures, symbolical of transportation. Circling around the upper part of the body of the vase is another series of etched panels. In these are pictured the various methods and conveyances of transportation by water, beginning with the Viking ship of the year 1000; Indian canoe, 1100; gondola, 1200; Santa Maria, 1492; a full-rigged three-master of 1800; the Stevens twin-screw steamer of 1804; the Cleremont of 1807, and an ocean steamer of 1840. On either side of the neck of the vase, protruding from the body, are two handles, one representing water, the other steam. On the obverse side of the vase is the etched inscription with the names of the donors, as follows:

From
American Exhibitors,
Department of Transportation Exhibits,
World's Columbian Exposition,
Chicago, U. S. A., 1893,
to
WILLARD A. SMITH, Chief,
In commeration of the conception, perfection and ad¬
ministration of the first distinctive Transporta¬
tion Department in the history of the
International Expositions.

Committee:—J. G. Pangborn, Baltimore & Ohio R. R., Chairman; George M. Pullman, President Pullman Palace Car Co.; Cornelius Vanderbilt, Chairman of the Board, N. Y. C. & H. R. R.R.; Frank Thomson, Vice-President Pennsylvania R R.; W. C. Van Horne, President Canadian Pacific R.R.; C. K. Lord, Vice-President Baltimore & Ohio R.R.; Edward H. Williams, Baldwin Locomotive Works; Edward Ellis, President Schenectady Locomotive Works; R. S. Hughes, President Rogers Locomotive Works; M. L. Hinman, President Brooks Locomotive Works; J. A. Spoor. General Manager Wagner Palace Car Co.; A. A. Pope, President National Malleable Castings Co.; C. A. Griscom, President International Navigation Co.; C. F. Kimball, President National Carriage Builders’ Ass’n; Robert P. Linderman, President Bethlehem Iron Works; John A. Tackaberry, Vice-President and General Manager John Stephenson Co.; J. Elfreth Watkins, Pennsylvania Railroad, Treasurer.

On either side of the vase there are good-sized reproductions in relief work of the groups by Boyle, one representing transportation by water, the other transportation on land.

The vase rests on an ebony base, on two sides of which there are large ivory panels. Engraved on one side is a picture of the modern locomotive and tender, on the other the modern steam¬ship. The detail in these panels is marvelously executed, and in its entirety this testimonial is a beautiful illustration of the development of art metal work in this country and its extraordinary possibilities at the close of the nineteenth century.


Source: Campbell's Illustrated Monthly - June 1894

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 26, 2018 5:51 am

In New York, New Jersey, Hoboken, Brooklyn and Newark there are fully fifteen thousand Finns. Of these nearly all of the women are the peasant class, of course, in domestic service, while the majority of men are carpenters, iron workers and bridge and house builders. At Tiffany's some of the highest skilled goldsmiths and silversmiths there employed are Finnish refugees or exiles.

Source: Everybody's Magazine - April 1904

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 29, 2018 4:07 am

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1902

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 11, 2018 2:10 pm

An advertisement for Charles Vayda, formerly with Tiffany & Co.:

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Chas. Vayda - Hollywood, Ca. - 1926

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 14, 2018 4:37 am

James A. Palmer, who is charged with forging the names of the employes of Tiffany & Co., was last Monday arraigned in the Jefferson Market Police Court. Through his counsel he waived further examination and was committed for trial in default of $10,000 bail. Last Friday Tiffany & Co. obtained an attachment for $13,526 against Palmer. The attachment was based on amounts obtained since April 5, 1891, and the affidavits give the dates, numbers and amount of fictitious bills paid by Tiffany & Co. as far as they have been able to discover. When the sheriff visited Palmer’s factory, 13 E. 17th St., he found everything had been removed two days previous.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 4th May 1892

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 27, 2018 3:58 am

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Tiffany & Co. - London - 1903

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 17, 2018 5:42 am

Frederick M. Bay, 21 years old, who boarded in Newark and was learning the trade of a silver finisher at Tiffany & Co.’s works, Forest Hill, was found in a dying condition, last Thursday morning, on Pompton Turnpike, near Cedar Grove, by a policeman. August Bennett, 22 years old, who had been learning the finisher’s trade in the same works, was bending over Bay, calling upon him to get up. Bay died soon afterward, and it was found that he had been stabbed in the aorta. The two young men had gone together to a hallowe’en parly the night before. Bennett, who had been drinking, said that on the way home they had been attacked by a stranger, who had stabbed his friend.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 7th November 1906

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 01, 2018 1:17 pm

THE BRIGHTON GOLD CUP


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One of the handsome trophies of the horse racing season of 1905 was the Brighton gold cup, raced for early this Autumn at Brighton Beach. It was modeled in the style of the old French cups, and is of exquisitely graceful proportions. The ornamentation is extremely plain, a character which to many minds adds to its charm.

The vessel rises from its marble base on a tapering column, which narrows as it ascends until near the top, when it broadens out to support the body. This part of the cup is broad-shaped, with handles delicately fashioned. The cover is surmounted by a horseshoe, two curved bits and a single laurel wreath, the latter symbolizing victory. The inscription on the body is simply “Brighton Cup, 1905."

The cup alone measures 13½ inches in height, has a capacity of 1½ pints and in its manufacture 740 dwts. of 18 karat gold are used. A beautiful marble base handsomely carved and showing polished veins, increases the height of the trophy to 17⅜ inches.

The trophy, which was won Oct. 1, by Cairngorm, was made by Tiffany & Co., New York.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 15th November 1905

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 05, 2018 5:47 am

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Tiffany & Co. - New York, Paris and London - 1913

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