Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 19, 2018 1:08 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1919

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 31, 2019 4:15 am

Amos M. Brush, who died Sunday in Greenwich, Conn., was the father of A. Edgar Brush, with Tiffany & Co.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd August 1905

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 03, 2019 5:29 am

INSPECTOR NALLY DEAD

Policeman's Troubled Career Ended by Apoplexy


The troubled career of Inspector James F. Nally in the Police Department ended yesterday morning at 9:30 o'clock. He died from apoplexy at his
home. No. 201 Edgecombe avenue, half an hour after his wife had reported at Police Headquarters that he was sick. Inspector Nally had not been feeling well for some time, but on Saturday was at his office In the 12th District, in Queens. Sunday was his day off, and he spent It at home.

Inspector Nally was born at Albany In 1847. He came to this city while young, and was apprenticed to a silversmith, later working several
years with Tiffany & Co. He served through the last three months of the war with the 69th New York Volunteers, and then came back to this city to work at his trade. On his thirtieth birthday, June 1 1877 he was made a patrolman, becoming roundsman four years later and sergeant In December, 1896.

While Devery was dealing out heavy justice at headquarters, Nally, in Police parlance, "got in bad" for some reason, and went to Staten Island. There he took the examination for captain. When the allowance of a veteran was added, this put him at the head of the list. Devery would not appoint him and Nally had to fight for his rights in the courts, and It was not until June, 1902 that he was made captain. His lot was not a happy one, for every possible attempt to "get" him was made down to the time of Deputy Commissioner Piper. Finally, to escape these attacks, Nally reported sick one day and remained on sick leave until Piper was dropped.

He recovered rapidly after, and was sent to the 30th Precinct, in West 100th street. There charges were made that things were not all right in the precinct, and Acting Captain Eggers made a stirring raid over his head on an alleged poolroom centre. This was thought to be the last touch, but instead of being "broke" the captain was sent to Leonard street. While he was 30th Precinct Nally's son got in a quarrel, in which there was a shooting in the saloon which he ran near the station. Young Nally could not be found for a long time, and it was said that while detectives were "looking" for him he had been seen in the station.

When he took the examinations for inspector, Nally was again at the head of the list of eligible candidates. He received his commission on June
20th 1905, and was sent to the 12th District about four months ago.

Inspector Nally leaves a wife and seven children, four sons and three daughters.


Source: New York Daily Tribune - 20th August 1907

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 12, 2019 1:43 pm

LIEUT. TIFFANY DEAD

Well Known Rough Rider Succumbs to Fever

DIED IN PARKER HOUSE, BOSTON

Released From Camp Wikoff, He Was Trying to Recuperate For the Journey Home—One of the Most Prominent Society Men In New York



BOSTON, Aug. 26.—Lieutenant “Willie” Tiffany of New York, son of the well known jeweler and famous for his service throughout the Santiago campaign with Colonel Roosevelt’s Rough Riders, died at the Parker House last night at 5 minutes after 6 o’clock.

Lieutenant Tiffany was seized with fever In Cuba after Santiago's surrender. When the Rough Riders sailed for Montauk Point, he was left In the
hospital, but later came north on the Olivette, accompanied by the brother of his fiancee and his own brother, Mr. Belmont Tiffany.

He landed In Boston on Tuesday. He was on the convalescent list and was consequently allowed to choose his own lodgings, while the more seriously ill and wounded were sent to the hospitals.

He became worse yesterday morning and passed quietly away shortly after 6 o’clock last night.

Lieutenant William Tiffany, who was a nephew of the late Mr. August Belmont and therefore a grandnephew of the famous Commodore Perry, was
among the first to Join the Rough Riders.

He spent several years on the plains in Montana as a cowboy in search of health and recreation. He was an Intimate friend of Colonel Roosevelt and was one of the famous Knickerbocker quartet, the others of which were Messrs. Woodbury Kane, Reginald Ronalds and Craig Wadsworth, who hastened to enroll themselves in the now famous command.

Mr. Tiffany was made a sergeant of Troop K of Rough Riders on May 20. When the regiment left Santiago on Aug. 1 Lieutenant Tiffany was among
those left in the hospital.

A few days later, on Aug. 11, Perry Tiffany sailed on the transport Yale for Santiago de Cuba to bring home his brother who was still ill with fever.
Mr. Tiffany was accompanied by Cambridge Livingston, whose sister, Miss Maud Livingston, was William Tiffany's fiancee.

When the United States army transport Olivette, known as No. 11, arrived from Santiago de Cuba, among the passengers were Second Lieutenant William Tiffany and Sergeant Hallett Allsop Borrowe of the Roosevelt Rough Riders.

Lieutenant Tiffany was accompanied by the brother who had gone to bring him home. He was then reported to have greatly Improved in health during the voyage.

Sergeant Borrowe. who did such good work while in charge of the dynamite gun during the fighting before Santiago, was reported to be dangerously ill.

He was later taken off the transport when she reached Montauk Point, while Lieutenant Tiffany was taken, at his own request, to the Parker House, Boston.


Source: Evening Journal - 26th August 1898

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 22, 2019 2:27 pm

TIFFANY'S ROBBED OF $90,000

Three Diamonds Stolen From Shop in Mysterious Way


New York. 23. The detective forces of two continents are working to recover three diamonds cut from the world famous Excelsior stone, and valued in the aggregate at $90,000, which were stolen from the shop of Tiffany & Co. May 4. The news of the great robbery has just become public.

In all ten diamonds were cut from the Excelsior last fall shortly after its purchase by Tiffany from an English syndicate. The stone was found at Jagersfontein, South Africa, in 1893, and in the rough weighed 971 carats. It was the largest diamond that ever has been cut up and the total value of the ten stones taken from it was $500,000. Five of the diamonds were sold by Tiffany to well known New York people last Christmas. Of the remaining flve the company now has only two.

The robbery was committed in the workshop, on the fifth floor of the Tiffany building, in Union square.


Source: The Columbus Journal - 24th May 1905

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 18, 2019 12:17 pm

The silver workers in Tiffany & Co.’s factory recently struck for advanced wages, and named some grievances they desired redressed. A committee of the union had an interview with members of the firm, when it was agreed that wages should be advanced $2 a week, and piece work be abolished. Upon this understanding the men returned to work.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - November 1886

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 25, 2019 1:01 pm

George Ladd, at one time a prominent retail jeweler of New York and later for many years connected with Tiffany & Co., died on Wednesday night at his home, 97 Seventh Ave., New York. The deceased, who was 82 years old, was born in England on Sept. 10, 1817, and when 17 years old he came to this country. He was for some time employed by his brother, William F. Ladd, a well known jeweler, and later he engaged in business for himself. About 1850 he went to California, where he remained for about 10 years. On his return he opened a jewelry store with John A. Read, which was known as the Diamond Parlor, at 11th St. and Broadway. They did business at that place until Mr. Read failed. Mr. Ladd then entered the employ of Tiffany & Co. who were then at Prince St. and Broadway. He remained in their employ until about five years ago. He was an expert on diamonds. Mr. Ladd leaves a son, A. Wilson Ladd, and a daughter, Mrs. Theodore Neilson, both of whom live in New York. The funeral took place from his late home Saturday.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd August 1899

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 28, 2019 2:40 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1942

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 06, 2019 1:09 pm

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1883

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 19, 2019 5:55 am

Louis C. Tiffany, of the Tiffany Studios and Tiffany & Co., is among the property owners at Oyster Bay whose walls and piers stretching across what is called the Shore Road, have been the cause of some excitement in that town in the last week. The Highway Commissioner of the town, assisted by a gang of laborers, has torn down portions of the walls and piers, claiming that they obstruct a public highway. The property owners claim that their land extends to the water’s edge.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 8th August 1906

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 30, 2019 3:28 am

Tiffany & Co. have placed on exhibition for a limited period the Zschille collection, consisting of several thousand pieces of antique armor, weapons, knives, forks, spoons, and various implements of steel and other metals. The collection is believed to be the largest and most comprehensive of its kind in existence.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 31st October 1894

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri May 03, 2019 4:37 am

Will of the Late Charles T. Cook

The petition for probate accompanying the will of Charles T. Cook, late president of Tiffany & Co., filed last Thursday, showed that he left real estate valued at more than $250,000 and personal property believed to be worth more than $1,000,000. He left to his wife, Sarah E. Cook, his house at 2 W. 48th St., and his country place at Elberon, four-tenths of the residuary estate and 100 shares of Tiffany & Co.’s stock.

To a sister, Amelia F. Cook, are given 30 shares of the stock and to Jane C. Singer and Mrs. Anna B. Redford, two other sisters, and Margaret Townley, a niece, and Ella F. Cook, a sister-in-law, 20 shares each, with 20 shares to be divided among the latter’s children. A number of minor bequests are made to nieces and nephews, ranging from $5,000 to $25,000. Elizabeth Williams, a servant, is to have an annuity of $300 for her life, and two other servants, Samuel Adams and Katie O’Shea, receive $1,000 each.

Five-tenths of the residuary estate is divided among the testator’s sisters and other relatives. The remaining one-tenth is set aside to provide an annual fund for the help of needy retired clerks of Tiffany & Co., who have seen 30 or more years of service.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 13th February 1907

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed May 15, 2019 4:39 am

John Wallis Clearman, a young salesman with Tiffany & Co., received a notification Thursday of his appointment to the United States Military Academy at West Point, to fill a vacancy in Congressman Quigg’s district. Young Clearman started for West Point Thursday night.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 11th July 1894

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 28, 2019 2:13 pm

Tiffany & Co's advertisement from the 1900 Paris Exhibition programme:

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1900

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 09, 2019 1:36 pm

LOUISE H. TIFFANY

Miami, Fla., Feb, 11 - Private funeral services will be held for Miss Louise H. Tiffany, daughter of the late Charles L. Tiffany, noted Manhattan jeweler, who died here yesterday at the age of 82. Burial will be at Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn.

Miss Tiffany was the sister of the late Louis Comfort Tiffany, noted artist and founder of the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation for art students at Oyster Bay. Mr. Tiffany gave his Oyster Bay home, Laurelton Hall, together with 80 acres of land to the foundation. Miss Tiffany was also the sister of the late Mrs. Annie O. Tiffany Mitchell, who died last month aged 92. A brother, Burnette Y. Tiffany of California survives.


Source: Brooklyn Daily Eagle - 11th February 1937

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Jul 27, 2019 2:22 pm

The “ Gladstone Testimonial,” a large ornament containing a thousand ounces of pure silver, is now on exhibition at Tiffany's. This magnificent and costly work of art is the gift of many of his admirers in America. There is much political significance in the gift, but of that others have spoken and The Circular treats it but as a work of art. It stands thirty-six inches high, with a width of twenty-two inches at the base. The testimonial is crowned with a small bust of Gladstone. The pose of the head is majestic, the face is stern yet of pleasant expression and the design is correct. Immediately below the bust is a pedestal with the inscription, “William Ewart Gladstone, Testimonial Presented by his American Admirers.” This is in fancy letters with raised surface and a fancy scroll-work background. In the center of this part of the pedestal is a laurel wreath surrounding a focus and scales of justice, with the words “ Home Rule ” in prominent letters. On the right side of this pedestal, and standing on the main pedestal is a female form clothed in a light garment covered with stars. She holds in her left hand an Irish harp, and with her right arm lovingly clasped about the base of the bust, she looks up at the form of Gladstone with a face fixed with deep admiration. She represents the American admirers, and they are beautifully represented. Upon the other side of this pedestal is a large wreath of laurels, and on the back the date of presentation, 1887, is done in a rich ornamented style. Below this pedestal is the base. This is a large oblong block resting upon six feet of Celtic pattern. Its panels are ornamented with emblems. In the center is represented the "lamp of learning," with the word “Sapientia” in block letters. Over this is the coat-of-arms of Christ Church College, with the words "Double First,” which means to the men of this college that he took the first place both in mathematics and classics. To the right of this central group is a wreath with the emblem of justice, and to the left is a similar wreath with the emblem of kind-heartedness. The head of Homer in relief on the left side of the base indicates the classical learning of Gladstone, and that of Demosthenes upon the other indicates his great power as an orator. Shamrocks and stars and stripes are patterned into this testimonial with great skill and artistic effect. The whole piece, which is made solid and of pure silver, is a remarkable example of workmanship, and a work of art that does credit to all concerned in its construction.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - June 1887

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 31, 2019 4:02 am

NEW YORK

William Pringle, formerly an engraver for Tiffany & Co., in this city, died Wednesday of a complication of diseases at his home in Dobbs Ferry. He was born in 1832. He left a widow and one son.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 26th August 1908

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 02, 2019 4:26 am

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1989

HAMPTON - SHELL AND THREAD - CHRYSANTHEMUM - CENTURY - AUDUBON

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 24, 2019 9:57 am

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Tiffany & Co. - New York - 1884

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Re: Tiffany & Co. Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 01, 2019 6:49 am

Ulrich Gable, a resident of the eastern district of Brooklyn, whose home was at 187 Rose St., died there Monday of last week of pleurisy. He was a silversmith for Tiffany & Co. for 40 years, and was a member of the Silversmiths’ Guild and the German Lutheran Church on N. 5th St. Mr. Gable was born in Germany Dec. 13, 1835, and is survived by two sons, Henry and William ; five daughters, Mrs. William Woolsey, Mrs. James Tice, with whom he lived ; Mrs. William Collins, Mrs. Joseph Muller and Mrs. William Scott; a brother, Henry ; a sister, Catherine, and 27 grandchildren. The funeral was held last Wednesday evening and the officiating clergyman was the Rev. Gustav Sommer.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 18th October 1911

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