Early Australian Silversmiths

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 09, 2011 7:18 am

THE MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS' ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA

Howey Place, Melbourne.

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Source: Hobart Gazette - 1901

The Manufacturing Jewellers' Association of Victoria was founded in 1889, with William Davis, whose firm, William Davis & Son (Jewellers), continues in business in Melbourne today, as one of its founder members. The members in 1901, as can be seen from the above advertisement, include Phillip Shappere, John Larard, Valentine Robertson, Robert Henry Parker, and Arthur Leopold Lamborn. The Association was noted as having seven members in 1903 and twenty-six in 1914. It faded away in the 1920's.

The Association’s objectives were noted as 'To maintain the standards of quality of the goods made by its members.' and 'To assist the Government as far as possible in enforcing the provisions of the “Trade Mark Act.” Protecting the Retailer and the Public against fraud in the manufacture of Jewellery.'

The gold wares produced by the members of The Manufacturing Jewellers' Association of Victoria were marked with the maker's mark, plus a numeral and device to denote the gold standard:

9ct. - A Wheatsheaf.
12ct. - A Pick and Shovel.
15ct. - A Golden Fleece (suspended sheep).
18ct. - A Three Masted Ship in full sail.

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 14, 2011 2:13 pm

W. MACDONNELL AND CO.

262, George Street, Sydney.

W. Macdonnell & Co., 262 George-street, Optical and Scientific Instrument Makers.–This business was established by Mr. Brush about fifty years ago a few doors north of the General Post Office. In 1850 the late Mr. Macdonnell joined the business. The establishment is now conducted by the Messrs. Macdonnell–sons oi the gentleman just hereinabove mentioned–-and Mr. Rodick. The character of this great city industry has since its birth been considerably changed. The jewellery trade has been abolished, and special features made of the following:–Watchmaking and importing and the manufacture of optical and scientific instruments, such as barometers, thermometers, telescopes, microscopes, theodolites, etc. The firm are agents of forty years' standing for the well-known firm of Tann–of fireproof safes fame–and are the agents for Negretti and Zambra, of Holborn, London, opticians, etc. Messrs Macdonnell and Co. hold a great reputation in the colonies.

Source: The Aldine Centennial History of New South Wales - W. Frederic Morrison - 1888

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W. MacDonnell - Sydney - 1867

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W. MacDonnell - Sydney - 1881


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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 16, 2011 2:51 pm

SAMUEL W. ARMFIELD

162 & 202, Gertrude Street, Fitzroy and Johnston Street, Abbotsford, Victoria.


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S.W. Armfield - Fitzroy, Melbourne - Undated

Armfield, Samuel W., Fitzroy and Abbotsford. Mr. Armfield is a native of Adelaide, S.A. He arrived in Melbourne in 1865, and after serving his apprenticeship for six years with Mr. J. Bernstein, manufacturing jeweller, &c, of Bourke-street, went into partnership with his brother, and was for a considerable time a prominent member of the late firm of Armfield Brothers, Collingwood. In 1884 the brothers dissolved partnership, and Mr. S. W. Armfield started on his own account at 202 Gertrude-street, Fitzroy, as a manufacturing jeweller, watchmaker, &c. At the commencement of 1887 he opened a branch establishment in Johnston-street, Abbotsford. He employs in his extensive workshops close upon twelve hands. Mr. Hoppe, a first-rate workman, is at the head of the watchmaking and repairing department, while Mr. Armfield superintends the manufacture of the gold and silver chains, medals, masonic and lodge jewels and emblems of all descriptions. Mr. Armfield has always taken a great interest in out-door sports, and is well-known in cricketing, rowing, and football circles. He is also a member of the various masonic and friendly societies in and around Melbourne. At the last Melbourne International Exhibition he secured first-class diplomas for skilful workmanship, &c.

Source: Victoria and its Metropolis, Past and Present - Alexander Sutherland - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 16, 2011 5:34 pm

THOMAS B. WAY

35, Bourke Street East, Melbourne.

Way, Thomas B., Melbourne, is proprietor of " Goldsmith's Hall," and importer and manufacturer of watches and clocks and jewellery, 35 Bourke
street east. The site of the above premises has been identified with the jewellery trade for the last thirty years. Mr. Way, the present proprietor, was born in Oxford, England, and came to Victoria when very young. After serving his apprenticeship with Mr. Hazleton he went to Tasmania, and there started in business, and after five years bought a branch business in Adelaide, S.A. In 1880 he took over his present premises, at the same disposing of the Tasmanian and Adelaide branches., so as to devote his whole time to the Melbourne house. In connection with the above business about ten hands are employed, including piece workers. Mr. Way introduced the time payment system into his business about three years ago, and now does a very extensive line in watches under this head. Mr. Way is a direct importer of all jewellery, and also a large buyer in the Melbourne market. The premises are of brick, three stories high, and have a frontage of 28 ft. to Bourke-street and 120 ft. of depth. He imports and manufactures every description of jewellery, clocks, and plate.


Source: Victoria and its Metropolis, Past and Present - Alexander Sutherland - 1888

An earlier advertisement for Thomas B. Way's Hobart business, that was located at 64, Liverpool Street:

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Thomas B. Way - Hobart - 1881

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 23, 2011 10:52 am

W.H. ALLEN

Brisbane Street, Launceston.

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W H Allen - Launceston - 1871

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 25, 2011 1:11 pm

THOMAS FARRER

Timor Street, Warrnambool.

Farrer, Thomas, Warrnambool, was born at No. 18 Nassau-street, New York City, U.S.A., and left there, when three years old, for England, where he learned the trade of watchmaking with Mr. W. E. Cribb, chronometer maker to the British Admiralty, 30 Southampton-row, Russell-square, London. He sailed from London to New Zealand, and thence to Victoria, spending about three years in the colonies, and then returned to England, entering the employ as foreman of Rowell and Son, Oxford and London, chronometer and watch makers to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, Prince Assam of Egypt, and the University of Oxford, and remaining there four years. After that he was engaged by Mr. George Farrar, of Tunbridge Wells, watchmaker and jeweller to H.R.H. Princess Louise and the Marquis of Lome. He left England again for the Cape of Good Hope, visited the Kimberley diamond fields, and came on to Melbourne in 1885, proceeding to Warrnambool, where he is now located in business as a watchmaker and jeweller in Timor-street. Mr. Farrer has visited California, Colorado, Oregon, British Columbia, and Alaska.

Source: Victoria and its Metropolis, Past and Present - Alexander Sutherland - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 06, 2011 6:04 am

J. ALLEN

353, Bourke Street, Melbourne.

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J. Allen - Melbourne - 1896

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 07, 2011 2:26 pm

JAMES JENNINGS

211, Queen Street, Melbourne.

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James Jennings - Melbourne - 1896

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James Jennings - Melbourne - 1875



JAMES JENNINGS, Optician, 211 Queen Street, Melbourne. This old-established and successful business was founded about the year 1869 by the late Mr. James Jennings, a native of Birmingham, England, where he was born in 1820. At an early age he was apprenticed to his uncle, Mr. Godfrey, optician, of Birmingham, with whom he remained for some years, during which he gained a thorough insight into all the branches of his profession. In 1844 he commenced business on his own account as a manufacturer of spectacles, and opened successfully three establishments, which he conducted on profitable lines. In 1869 Mr. Jennings arrived in Melbourne, where he opened in business as a manufacturing ophthalmic optician. For over twenty years he was the only one in Australia, and was awarded all the prize medals given in Sydney and Melbourne for colonial-made spectacles. He also obtained many other awards, including first order of merit and gold medal, Colonial and International Exhibition, Melbourne, 1872-3; bronze medal, Sydney International Exhibition, 1873; gold medal, London, 1873; bronze medal, Metropolitan International Exhibition, Sydney, 1873; first order of merit and bronze medal, Colonial International Exhibition, Melbourne, 1888-9.

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Since the death of Mr Jennings in August 1901, the business has been carried on under the old name by his grandson, Mr. O. J. Gillespie, whose portrait we publish. This gentleman received a thorough practical training under the late Mr Jennings, and afterwards went through a course of optical study in Sydney. Gold, silver, and steel-rimmed spectacles and eye glasses of every description are entirely manufactured by this old established firm, the business cf which is efficiently conducted by Mr. Gillespie on behalf of Mrs. Jennings, the widow of the late proprietor.

Source: The Cyclopedia of Victoria (Illustrated): An Historical and Commercial Review, Descriptive and Biographical, Facts, Figures and Illustrations : An Epitome of Progress - Volume 2 - James Smith - 1904

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:47 am

WILLIAM MORETON

South Row, Sydney.

Probably the earlist advertisement for a Sydney Goldsmith. This advertisement appeared in the Sydney Gazette, in May 1803.

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W. Moreton - Sydney - 1803

However, William Moreton did not stick around for too long, he departed the colony the following year.

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 11, 2011 2:16 pm

WILLIAM COLE

68, Liverpool Street, Hobart Town.

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W. Cole - Hobart Town - 1865

William Cole arrived in Tasmania in c.1833, the choice of destination, however, was not his, as he was serving a sentence of transportation from England for fourteen years. He was employed by David Barclay as an assigned convict, and later went into partnership with another former convict, Charles Jones.

William Cole was noted as the retailer of a cigar case made by Joseph Forrester:

'A beautifully embossed cigar case manufactured by Mr. Forrester for William Cole of Elisabeth Street.'

Source: Hobart Town Courier - 11th February 1846

The cigar case is now part of the collection at The Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery.

See: http://static.tmag.tas.gov.au/decorativ ... index.html

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 16, 2011 9:40 am

WILLIAM GOLDING

96, Liverpool Street, Hobart.

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W. Golding - Hobart - 1881

William Golding arived in Australia from England in 1853, he was seven years of age when his family landed at Sydney and in 1858 they finally settled in Hobart. Golding served his apprenticeship under David Barclay as from c.1860 and continued to work for Barclay after the completion of his term. He left Barclay's employment to start his own business in c.1875 at 52, Murray Street, Hobart, and three years later, following Barlay's decision to retire, purchased the business of his former Master, that was now located at 96, Liverpool Street.

William Golding was noted as exhibiting his wares at The Tasmanian Exhibition at Launceston in 1891.

The last years of the 19th century saw the firm move to the corner of Liverpool Street and Elizabeth Street, Hobart, a location where the firm of Golding & Son is still in business today. William Golding passed the business to his sons, Arthur and William in 1912 and this family owned business is now in its fourth generation.

Below is an advertisement for the business of 'G. Golding' of Launceston, Tasmania. It may well be that of another member of William Golding's family.

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G. Golding - Launceston - 1881

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 18, 2011 4:20 pm

F. & W. STEWART

100, Charles Street, Launceston.

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F & W Stewart - Launceston - 1881

F & W Stewart were awarded the Third Order of Merit at The International Exhibition held at Melbourne in 1888.

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F & W Stewart - Launceston - 1902

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F & W Stewart - Launceston - 1906

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Stewart's - Launceston - 1954

Established in 1880 by Frederick and William Whitaker Stewart.

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 23, 2011 12:46 am

S.A. DE LISSA

292, Pitt Street, Sydney.

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S.A. De Lissa - Sydney - 1867

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 23, 2011 2:30 pm

ERNEST BRUNKE

Bourke Street East, Melbourne.

Mr. E. Brunke, who for many years carried on business as jeweller in Bourke-street east, was found dead on October 1, at his residence in South Yaira.

Source: The Australasian Sketcher - 1873

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 23, 2011 2:44 pm

D.H. LILLINGSTON

Ballarat

Lillingston, D. H., Balmoral, is a native of Hobartown, Tasmania, and arrived in Victoria in 1853 with his parents, who settled in Ballarat, where his father, Mr. D. W. Lillingston, still resides. Mr. D. H. Lillingston learned the trade of a watchmaker and jeweller, and worked at it for sixteen years. He also had the management of Mr. Levinson's business, in Bridge-street, Ballarat, for seven years. In April, 1884, he purchased the business of the Western Hotel, Balmoral, which old-established and wellknown house he now conducts.

Source: Victoria and its Metropolis, Past and Present - Alexander Sutherland - 1888

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 24, 2011 2:21 pm

GEORGE CASPER

81, Collins Street East, Melbourne.

GEO. CASPER. WATCHMAKER, JEWELLER, and SILVERSMITH, 81 COLLINS STREET EAST, opposite Bank of Victoria. Watches, Clocks, and Jewellery Made and Repaired on the Premises.

Source: The Australasian Sketcher - 1873

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 24, 2011 2:45 pm

JAMES BENJAMIN EDWARDS

Pall Mall, Bendigo.

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Mr. James Benjamin Edwards, Watchmaker and Jeweller, Pall Mall, Bendigo (private address, "Vilette," Rowan Street), was born at Forest Creek, near Castlemaine, in 1852. His father, the late Mr. Jas. B. Edwards, was the first and only watchmaker and jeweller on the Forest Creek diggings, and carried on business in a large canvas tent with dwelling attached. When about six years old, owing to a rush taking place at "Daisy Hill" (now called Amherst), the whole family removed to that place, and there he received his early education. A few years later, on the outbreak of the rush to "Back Creek" (now Talbot), the family settled in that district, and the subject of this sketch remained there until 1872, receiving a sound practical training and valuable experience as a watchmaker and jeweller. He then decided to embark in business on his own account, and to that end opened up premises at Clunes, where his skilled workmanship soon placed him on a firm basis, but in 1882, owing to the decline in mining in that district, he resolved to abandon operations, after nine years' residence there. Being away for a holiday, he visited Sandhurst (now called Bendigo), and being greatly impressed with the resources of the surrounding country he decided to commence business, which he did in November, 1882, in premises in the centre block of the Mall. Here he diligently applied himself to the working up of a connection, and by strict integrity and unfailing perseverance laid the foundation of his present well-known and prosperous business. The success attained by Mr. Edwards attracted many rivals, and businesses were opened up on all sides, causing very keen competition. Here his energies found full scope, and, in face of the strong opposition, his trade expanded so rapidly that it became necessary to secure larger premises in order to cope with the ever-increasing demand. Mr. Edwards accordingly secured his present extensive premises, and greatly enlarged his business, and by the application of the best workmanship to all classes of repairs gained for himself the premier position in the watchmaking and jewellery line in the city of Bendigo.

Mr. Edwards has been located at his present address for the past eleven years, during which he has made a practice of personally supervising all work done, on the premises, a fact which is in a large measure responsible for the success attained by his untiring and energetic efforts. His special line is that of practical watchmaking, and in this he stands unrivalled. Mr. Edwards has studied as an optician, and keeps a large stock of lenses, frames, etc., which can be fitted by him to suit various sights. Jewellery of every conceivable design, watches (including English and American), and other lines essential to the trade are kept in stock, which is the most comprehensive in the city. Although a busy man, Mr. Edwards finds time to devote to outside matters, and was president of the Chamber of Commerce during 1901, when matters of great importance to the residents of the State were attended to. While filling this office he devoted considerable time and untiring efforts to forwarding all movements for the welfare of the trading community. Mr. Edwards was for many years treasurer of the Bendigo Total Abstinence Society, and during his term of office considerable additions were made to the society's property, and financial matters were greatly improved. He was also president of the society for a term of one year. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, his lodge being the Zenith, No. 52, Bendigo, of which he is a Past Master, and now occupies the position of W.M. of the Bendigo Lodge of Mark Master Masons, No. 12, and is at present (1903) Second Principal of the Royal Arch Chapter of Bendigo, No. 7, Bendigo; and was for six years a member of the local State Board of Advice. Mr. Edwards takes a great interest in photography, and is president of the Bendigo Amateur Photographic Society for 1903, this being the third time he has occupied that position. A special feature of his skill in connection with the camera is stereoscopic underground mining photography, in which particular branch he excels. During the visit of the Duke of York (now Prince of Wales) to Victoria a set of specially prepared stereoscopic transparencies of underground mining views, taken by Mr. Edwards at a depth of from 1,000 to over 3,000 feet, were much appreciated by H.R.H., who graciously accepted them as a memento of his visit. He devotes considerable time to the affairs of the local Methodist Church, of which he is a trustee, and has been largely instrumental in bringing into prominence a branch of the church at Quarry Hills, Bendigo, which is now assuming large dimensions. Mr. Edwards married, in 1883, Blanche, daughter of Mr. John Smith, of Clunes, a very old pioneer, and has a family of four daughters and three sons.


Source: The Cyclopedia of Victoria (illustrated): an Historical and Commercial Review, Descriptive and Biographical, Facts, Figures and Illustrations : an Epitome of Progress - Volume 2 - James Smith - 1904

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:41 pm

TAYLOR & SHARP

61, Elizabeth Street, and 96, Liverpool Street, Hobart.

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Taylor & Sharp - Hobart - 1906

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Source: Tasmainan Goverment Gazette - 31st May 1904

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 26, 2011 3:01 pm

HENRY McKINNON MUIRHEAD

Adelaide

Henry McKinnon Muirhead a native of Glasgow, and of one of the oldest and most respected families in Scotland; arrived in South Australia in 1850, and having brought out capital, established a jeweller's business in Adelaide, which he conducted from the time of his arrival till 1880. Although he obtruded himself but little in politics, he was always distinguished as a gentleman of unimpeachable integrity, and deservedly held in the highest respect by those with whom he came in contact in business, and personal friends. He was one of the early members of Chalmers Scotch Church, and for many years held the office of Elder; he was also a member of the first Municipal Council for Glenelg, at which place he resided, and built a number of residences there. He was ever ready and willing to aid the poor and distressed in an unostentatious manner, and assisted in many ways in making the sports held on the anniversary of the colony a success. He paid several visits to the old country, but always returned to this, the land of his adoption. He died at Glenelg, February, 1880, after a short illness, much regretted. He married a daughter of the late Dr. Chas. O'Reilly (Vice-President of the Royal College of Physicians, Ireland), and left a widow, three sons, and two daughters, surviving him.

Source: Notable South Australians; or, Colonists, Past and Present - George E. Loyau - 1885

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 26, 2011 3:11 pm

EDWIN SAWTELL

3, Rundle Street, Adelaide

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E. Sawtell - Adelaide - 1885

Edwin Sawtell, the oldest watchmaker and optician in Adelaide, was born in Bristol. As a child he was predisposed to "making things," and his parents, allowing his natural bent of mind full play, apprenticed him to the trade in 1831. At that time nearly everything was hand-made, particularly watches and watch work; many of the tools even being constructed by the apprentice before he began his work. Mr. Sawtell says: "What is now called labour-saving machinery is considered by those experienced in the trade antagonistic to the full development of a boy's natural mechanical ability." Notwithstanding the long hours of duty, from 7 a.m. till 8 p.m., he devoted his spare time to the invention of many mechanical novelties, and one of the most successful of his endeavours was a model steamboat, which was considered a real wonder in those days. He also invented a peculiar gas stove, one of the first made in England. During the last two years of his apprenticeship he was occupied in repairing and rating of ships' chronometers, adjusting scientific instruments, etc., particularly those used in meteorology. Although legally out of his time at the age of 21, so fond was he of his trade and master, that he determined to serve his full term, and in consequence worked eight months for 2s. 6d. a week. In these days, when boys are educated by the State, as well as expecting to pay no premium, this wage is often asked for in the first year of apprenticeship. A very different state of things to that of fifty years ago. On leaving his apprenticeship his skill and care as a workman led to his services being availed of by the leading establishments in Bristol, and he ultimately started in business for himself. Advancing steadily for some years, the news of "gold" in Australia made him anxious to visit this part of the world, and although his passage was paid to Melbourne, on the arrival of the vessel in South Australia he abandoned his intention of going there, and settled in Adelaide in 1853. He commenced business in Port Adelaide, where he erected a beautiful transit instrument, and in conjunction with an astronomical clock he and his son Alfred for many yearsdetermined the true time by observation with these instruments. This proceeding was absolutely necessary then for the rating of chronometers, as there was no real public time or Semaphore time ball instituted. During the early days of the Port, Mr. Sawtell supplied the leading daily paper with the barometer and thermometer records, just as Messrs. Todd and Wragge do now. His last invention is a patent tell-tale clock, and he has accomplished the somewhat difficult task of grinding lenses, including the spherico-cylindrical form now in request by oculists for the correction of astigmatism. His establishment is always a delight to those of a scientific turn, as it abounds in novelties, and the proprietor is still as enthusiastic as ever in the scientific branch of his business.

Source: Notable South Australians; or, Colonists, Past and Present - George E. Loyau - 1885


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Alfred E. Sawtell - Adelaide - 1888

The above advertisement appears to indicate that by 1888, Edwin Sawtell's son, Alfred, had assumed control of the business.

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