Early New Zealand Silversmiths

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Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 12, 2012 1:02 pm

G & T YOUNG

75, later, 252, Lambton Quay, Wellington. 88, Princes Street, Dunedin. Stafford Street, Timaru. Thames Street, Oamaru.

Young, G. and T. (George Young and Thomas Gray Young),
Watchmakers and Jewellers, 73 Lambton Quay, Wellington. Telephone: 679. Bankers: National Bank of New Zealand. Manager, Mr. Matthew Gray Young. Private residence: Talavera Terrace. Head office: Dunedin. Branches: Timaru and Oamaru.

This large business was established in Dunedin in 1862, by the present proprietors, who opened the Timaru branch about 1876, and that at Oamaru about five years later. The Wellington branch was founded in 1889.


Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Wellington Provincial District] - Cyclopedia Company Limited - 1897 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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G & T Young - Dunedin - 1898

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G & T Young - Wellington-1901

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G & T Young Ltd. - Wellington-1915

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 12, 2012 1:09 pm

T. KATTERFELDT

George Street, Dunedin

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T. Katterfeldt - Dunedin - 1883

Silverly noted the following: Theodore William Katterfeldt's naturalization record states that he was a jeweller who was born in Brunswick, Germany in about 1836. He was naturalized in Auckland in 1893. His marriage to Mary Steel was registered in Victoria in 1868.

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 13, 2012 11:19 am

JAMES KING

Cuba Street, Wellington

King, James, Watchmaker and Jeweller, Cuba Street, Wellington. Bankers: Bank of New Zealand.

This business is one of the earliest of its kind established in Wellington, and Mr. King claims to have been the first to start manufacturing jewellery locally. To his enterprise in taking the initial step in this industry, the thanks are due of the large number now directly engaged in, or otherwise benefitted by, the local manufacturing of jewellery. At present, Mr. King finds employment for five hands. His well-known shop is only a few yards from the corner of Cuba and Manners Streets, being very convenient for trams and 'buses to all parts of the city. The premises have frontage of some sixteen feet, with a large show window. A comprehensive and tasteful array of both locally-made and imported jewellery attracts the passer-by to pause and examine. The building is of brick and iron, shop and dwelling being combined. Mr. King's trade mark is the King of Diamonds. When there is business to be done in the jewellery line, Mr. King invariably secures a large share of it; and a testimony to the class of article sold and work done is the fact that those who once visit the establishment come again, or recommend their friends to go.

(N.B.–Mr. King died on the 31st of May, 1896, the business being, at the time of writing, carried on by the executors on behalf of the children.)


Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Wellington Provincial District] - Cyclopedia Company Limited - 1897 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 15, 2012 6:29 am

GEORGE HYNDMAN

Moray Place, Dunedin

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George Hyndman - Dunedin - 1883

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 16, 2012 5:06 am

DONALD MACPHERSON DOUGLAS

114, Manners Street, Wellington


Douglas, Donald Macpherson, Watchmaker and Jeweller, 114 Manners Street, Wellington. Private residence: 119 Stafford Street, Wellington.

Mr. Douglas was born in London, and served his apprenticeship with Messrs. Johnston and Co., of John Street, Bedford Row, W.C. He arrived in Lyttelton in 1883, per the ship “British Queen,” under engagement to Messrs. B. Petersen and Co., of Christchurch, as silversmith. After four years service, Mr. Douglas removed to Wellington, entering the employ of Mr. S. Kohn, of Lambton Quay, in 1888. All kinds of gold and silver-work are undertaken at this establishment, and many champion silver cups, and sets of silver plate for presentation purposes have been made by Mr. Douglas. In cleaning and repairing clocks and watches, and making and mending jewellery, he does an improving trade. The business was established in 1892.


Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Wellington Provincial District] - Cyclopedia Company Limited - 1897 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 17, 2012 5:05 am

JOHN HISLOP

74, Princes Street, Dunedin

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J Hislop - Dunedin - 1883

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John Hislop - Dunedin - 1898

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John Hislop - Dunedin - 1903

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Source: The Ecclesiastical Observer - 15th February 1877


ACCIDENTS AND FATALITIES
Dunedin, Oct 19
Mr John Hislop, watchmaker and jeweller, died suddenly in his shop in Princess street today. He was 69 years of age and an old resident.


Source: West Coast Times - 20th October 1900

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 18, 2012 5:55 am

LITTLEJOHN & SON

85, later, 222-224, Lambton Quay, Wellington

Littlejohn and Son (Alexander Ironside Littlejohn and Peter Still), Watchmakers and Jewellers, 85 Lambton Quay, Wellington. Telephone 53. Bankers: Bank of Australasia.

Mr. Littlejohn is a native of Scotland, where he learned his trade with his father, Mr. Wilson Littlejohn, who came to the Colony in 1879, accompanied by the former, and founded the present large business in the same year. Mr. Still is also a native of Scotland; he is a nephew of the founder of the business, and has been associated with the latter since his boyhood's days. In the Old Land he learned the trade with his uncle, and on the latter's leaving to take up his residence in Wellington he was sent to the great centre of chronometer manufacture in London. Here he remained with several of the best and largest houses in the trade, for three years, and gained a large experience which for about twelve years past has been employed in the interests of the business in Wellington.

Messrs. Littlejohn and Son have been prominent in the Empire City for many years. Their splendid establishment on Lambton Quay is noticeable to even the most casual observer. The building is a substantial three-story brick structure, with over 2500 square fect of floorage space, and was built by the firm to meet the requirements of an extensive and increasing manufacturing business. Every visitor to Wellington cannot fail to notice the cuphonious chimes proceeding from the turret clock in the Post Office every quarter of an hour. It is a revelation to those who anticipated a state of semi-barbarism to find such evidence of modern civilisation at the antipodes. But probably few will be disposed to believe that all the machinery contained in the clock in question was manufactured by the firm who are the subjects of this notice. No less than thirteen turret clocks manufactured by the firm, including those at Invercargill and Port Chalmera, are at present in use in the Colony. The firm have, more recently, completed a splendid clock for the Auckland Art Gallery.

Messrs. Littlejohn and Son employ competent specialists for each department of their manufacturing trade, and have one of the largest and most complete establishments in the Colony for the manufacture of jewellery, chronometers, clocks, watches, instruments, and optical goods. The jewellery shop has all needful appliances for this department of the trade. In the mechanical workroom there is a good deal of machinery, including lathes and planing machines, for accomplishing the work required; while the optical department is kept entirely separate, and has contrivances for lens grinding, drilling, and all other needs of this branch of the business. Sixteen skilled workmen are employed in connection with the firm's trade, and from £130 to £150 are paid per month in wages. The handsome shop is elegantly furnished with immense show cases, which display useful as well as ornamental articles of divers kinds. The firm are also large importers, from British and Continental markets, of such goods as they do not manufacture on the premises.


Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Wellington Provincial District] - Cyclopedia Company Limited - 1897 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre


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W. Littlejohn and Son - Wellington-1901

'THE CELEBRATED REVLUC'


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W. Littlejohn & Son - Wellington-1901

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W. Littlejohn & Son - Wellington-1915

Established in 1879

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 19, 2012 6:03 am

HARRY REYNOLDS

Colombo Street, Christchurch

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Source: Tasmainian Government Gazette - 1901

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 20, 2012 10:18 am

JOHN ARTHUR DANIEL CHISHOLM

33a, Cuba Street, Wellington


Chisholm, John Arthur Daniel, Watchmaker, Jeweller, Optician and Importer, 33A, Cuba Street, Wellington. Telegraphic address: “Chisholm, Wellington.”
Bankers: Bank of New Zealand. Private residence: 10 Thompson Street. Agent: Mr. James Davidson, Kaikoura.

The business in which Mr. J.Arthur Chisholm is now so well known was established in 1886 by Messrs. W. Littlejohn and Son, as a branch shop. Three years after, Mr. Chlsholm, who had managed it for some time previously, purchased it from his employers, and has since then made effective alterations. The shop is well stocked and well kept, and the windows are always attractive. Though Mr. Chisholm's trade in mainly local, he does a fair business outside the city, especially in manufacturing and repairing. For these departments, various parts of the Colony (from Auckland in the North to Dunedin in the South) are laid under contribution. Mr. Chisholm was born in Wellington, and educated at Mr. Curtis's Grammar School and at the old Wesleyan School under Mr. Stevens. Removing with his parents to Wanganui, Mr. Chisholm was apprenticed to the business in all its branches, with Mr. S. H. Drew, the well-known jeweller of that town. On the completion of his apprenticeship, in 1882, Mr. Chisholm returned to Wellington, and entered the employ of Messrs. Littlejohn and Son, with whom he remained some six or seven years, having now twenty years' experience at his trade. Socially, Mr. Chisholm takes an active part in all matters having for their objects the physical and mental development of the young. For many years he has taken an interest in cricket, and is at present a member of the Wesley and Jewellers' Clubs. In his younger days as a cadet in the volunteers, Mr. Chisholm made a name as a marksman, being on at least one occasion a runner-up for the championship. In musical circles, Mr. Chisholm is known as a celloist.


Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Wellington Provincial District] - Cyclopedia Company Limited - 1897 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 21, 2012 6:55 am

E. SOUNESS

Corner of Princes and Dowling Streets, Dunedin

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E. Souness - Dunedin - 1898

Silverly noted the following: Edward Souness is listed as a Dunedin watchmaker in the 1890 through 1914 New Zealand Electoral Roles. He is listed as a watchmaker on the 1919 New Zealand Electoral Roles for Manawatu-Wanganui.

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 22, 2012 11:12 am

FRANK GRADY

Willis Street, Wellington


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Frank Grady - Wellington - 1901


Grady, Frank, Jeweller, Willis Street, Wellington. Telephone 380. Bankers: Bank of New Zealand, Private residence: Woolcombe Street.
This business was established in 1880, and in 1895 Mr. Grady moved into his present fine premises, which are handsomely fitted, and lighted throughout with electric light. The building is of two stories, built of brick, wood, and iron, Five hands are employed on the premises. Mr. Grady is a large importer of jewellery.


Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Wellington Provincial District] - Cyclopedia Company Limited - 1897 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 23, 2012 5:37 pm

ALEXANDER HARRISON BROWNLEY

Onehunga, Auckland

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Source: Tasmanian Government Gazette - 1904

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 24, 2012 4:27 pm

HARRY AUGUSTUS RAVEN

7a, Courtenay Place, Wellington

Raven, Harry Augustus, Watchmaker and Jeweller, 7A Courtenay Place, Wellington. Private residence: Newtown.

Mr. Raven was born in Auckland, and became apprenticed to the watchmaking and jewellery trade in Christchurch, completing the latter part of his indentures in Wellington. In 1887, Mr. Raven removed to Petone, and commenced business on his own account, continuing in that rising manufacturing borough till January, 1895. when he sold out and removed to Greymouth. After about a year or the West Coast; Mr. Raven returned to the North Island, establishing himself as above. His specialties are the cleaning and repairing of watches and clocks, and the making and repairing of jewellery.


Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Wellington Provincial District] - Cyclopedia Company Limited - 1897 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 27, 2012 5:21 am

WICKS BROTHERS

122, George Street, Dunedin

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Wicks Brothers - Dunedin - 1883

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 29, 2012 7:14 pm

ARTHUR BEVERLY

Princes Street, Dunedin

Arthur Beverly was born on 22 March 1822 at Alford, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. His father was George Beverly, a farmer; his mother's identity is unknown. Arthur Beverly was educated at home. Occasionally he attended a parish school, and evening classes conducted by James Taylor, a shoemaker, from whom he learnt Euclid, trigonometry, astronomy, surveying and navigation. At about the age of 14 he was apprenticed to Aberdeen watchmaker and optician Baillie Berry. He soon gained a considerable reputation as a lensmaker, and made a set of microscope lenses for Dr George Dickie, professor of botany at Marischal College, University of Aberdeen. Dickie was sufficiently pleased with these to recommend Beverly to other scientists.

After eight years as a journeyman in Aberdeen, Beverly sailed for Melbourne, Australia, in 1852. He tried his luck in the Victorian goldfields, but quickly realised that he could earn more money as a watchmaker in Melbourne. There he became friends with William Strachan, who worked for the firm of Patterson and Strachan, provision merchants. In 1857 Strachan emigrated to Dunedin, New Zealand, and at his encouragement Beverly followed in January 1858. In order to set up a new watchmaking business, he brought with him a stock of jewellery, clocks and watches. He also brought materials for daguerreotypy, as he was interested in photography.

Beverly set about acquiring property in Dunedin, and by 1861 owned the buildings which housed his shop in Princes Street, and a large block of residential land. On part of his land there was a natural spring. He offered this section as a brewery site to his friend William Strachan, who was then a brewer at Port Chalmers. Strachan paid Beverly £2,000 for land which had cost Beverly only £34 10s. a few years previously.

Beverly was briefly involved in local politics, as a member of the Dunedin Town Board from 1859 to 1861. When news of Gabriel Read's gold strike reached Dunedin, Beverly was asked to report on the find, and on the strength of his opinion many Dunedin men joined the large numbers bound for the diggings. In 1862 he was a member of the Otago provincial expedition to the West Coast, during which he made a collection of plants between Preservation Inlet and Breaksea Sound.

The widespread financial crisis of 1864 caused Beverly to sell his business. He devoted the second half of his life to his scientific interests and to gardening. Most of his known writings, including notebooks which are now in the Hocken Library, Dunedin, date from this period. Beverly's ability to apply his mathematical skills to practical problems caused him to be consulted by mining engineers and surveyors working on the Otago goldfields. His notebooks contain examples of water race plans and other design calculations relevant to mining. When the public of Oamaru doubted their engineer's opinion that no motive power could be derived from the flow of water in the race which supplied the town, Beverly was consulted. He confidently demolished the engineer's theory, and gave advice on how maximum energy extraction could be achieved.

When Dunedin hosted the New Zealand Exhibition in 1865, Beverly was a member of the panel of judges and also an exhibitor. He won praise for two of his exhibits: a side-board clock, with compensation balance and apparatus to keep it wound up by the variations in temperature of the atmosphere, and a planimeter for the measurement of irregular areas on maps and plans. On 27 November 1865 the Royal Scottish Society of Arts awarded Beverly the Makdougall-Brisbane Prize for the specimen planimeter. The medal which was part of the prize, and the planimeter, have since disappeared. However, the clock is in the possession of the University of Otago Physics Department. Later, Beverly believed his planimeter had been copied and improved by Jakob Amsler, but it is now clear that Amsler was first to invent the device. Beverly's planimeter differed from Amsler's by using a rectangular, rather than a circular, reference frame.

Astronomy was another of Beverly's interests. Several of his notebooks are devoted to astronomical calculations which derive the orbits of comets observed by him and predict the circumstances of lunar occultations. Beverly's observations were made with the three inch refracting telescope constructed by him and now in the possession of the Beverly—Begg Observatory, Dunedin. For many years his predictions of astronomical phenomena were published as 'Rough astronomical notes' in Dunedin's Evening Star. He also regularly contributed to 'Notes and queries', a column in the Otago Witness which answered readers' questions.

In the early years of the settlement Beverly made transit observations to establish local time for the purposes of correcting ships' chronometers. When C. W. Adams, then chief surveyor at Dunedin, wrote a paper on the measurement of distances with long steel tapes, it was Beverly who devised the series, later used world wide, to account for the sag of the tapes. Beverly insisted on measuring the elasticity of the tapes by actual experiment, but scorned the idea of further experimentation to verify the underlying mathematics.

Beverly was intrigued by the theories of Professor C. Piazzi Smyth, which were described in Life and work at the Great Pyramid (1867). As an agnostic he was sceptical of Piazzi Smyth's religious ideas, but devoted much effort to testing and extending the mathematical base which they suggested.

Beverly was described as a small, inconspicuous man. His appearance matched his temperament to a degree: he was always reluctant to publish his work and did so only at the strongest urgings of his friends. He died a bachelor on 25 October 1907 at Dunedin. He left to the University of Otago an estate valued at £57,000. The will contained such detailed instructions regarding the management of the bequest that the university sought clarification from the Supreme Court. A judgement freed the university from obligation to comply in detail. Income from the Beverly bequest now funds prizes and fellowships in the departments of physics and mathematics.


Source: Hardwicke Knight and L. E. S. Amon. 'Beverly, Arthur - Biography', from the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 1-Sep-10

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 31, 2012 3:49 pm

STEWART DAWSON & CO.

146 & 148, Queen Street, Auckland

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Stewart Dawson & Co. - Auckland - 1903



STEWART DAWSON & CO.

Corner of Dowling and Princes Street, Dunedin

Stewart Dawson and Co. , Watch-makers and Jewellers, Corner of Dowling and Princes Street, Dunedin. This business was founded in 1872, by Mr. Stewart Dawson, at 20 Hatton Garden, London, E.C. Since then branches have been established in Melbourne, Sydney, Perth, Brisbane, Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch. The Dunedin branch was opened in December, 1902. The building is of brick, three stories in height, and faced with cement. It has a total front-age of 67 feet, 25 feet on Princes Street, and 42 feet on Dowling Street. A large display of jewellery, gold and silver ware, makes the premises most attractive, especially at night, when they are not only lit up most brilliantly within, but are lighted outside by eight of the finest type of lamps to be seen in the city. The interior of the building has the appearance of a fairy palace: harmony of colour, design, and arrangement is combined in a most pleasing manner, and all the jewellery is of the very latest type, being specially sent out from the London office. It comprises the latest designs in rings, diamond jewellery, brooches, pendants, bracelets, and an array of gold watches of different makes and values. Choice articles in solid silver, and silver-plated ware, handsome clocks, and costly jewels in morocco cases are also kept in stock; and the whole is offered at prices that must give Messrs Stewart Dawson and Co.'s establishment a powerful influence in trade in the city and surrounding districts. Mr. Stewart Dawson, the head of the firm, is a man of many qualifications, and may be said to be the embodiment of the business man, his practical knowledge, energy and experience having built up all the houses which bear his name.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Otago & Southland Provincial Districts] - 1905 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre


STEWART DAWSON & Co.

Wellington

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Stewart Dawson & Co. - Wellington - 1903

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 01, 2012 6:12 am

GEORGE HALLIDAY

Cameron Street, Whangarei

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Halliday, George, Watchmaker and Jeweller,Cameron Street,Whangarei. Mr Halliday was born at Pakaraka in 1871, finished his education in Auckland, and after being in the Kawakawa post and telegraph office for a time adopted his present trade of a jeweller and was seven years with Mr. Alexander Mundy of Auckland. He is an ardent lover of all sports and for two years was secretary of the Orange Lodge, Kawa-kawa, and afterwards worshipful master. Mr. Halliday, who conducts a flourishing business, married a daughter of Mr. J. P. Horner, of Auckland.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Auckland Provincial District] - Cyclopedia Company Limited - 1902 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 02, 2012 1:56 pm

SAMUEL HENRY DREW

Taupo Quay, Wanganui

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Samuel Henry Drew

Samuel Henry Drew was born in Maidenhead, Berkshire, England, on 17 November 1844, the son of Fanny Booker and her husband, Henry Drew, a watchmaker and jeweller. Soon after Samuel's birth the family moved to Ventnor on the Isle of Wight. In the early 1850s they emigrated to Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania), where Drew was educated at the Launceston Grammar School. After completing his education he was sent to London to serve his apprenticeship to the watchmaking trade.

After Samuel's return to Tasmania, the family emigrated to Nelson, New Zealand, where they arrived on board the Lallah Rookh on 12 August 1860. Henry Drew practised his trade in Trafalgar Street, and it is likely that his son worked with him until August 1870 when Samuel moved to Wanganui. There he entered into business on Taupo Quay, where he established his jewellery and watchmaking business.

Drew returned to Nelson in 1872, and on 8 May married Catherine Alice Beatson, daughter of William Beatson, a well-known architect. They established their home in Wanganui, where they raised a family of four boys and four girls. Another daughter died in infancy.

Drew became successful in his profession, but was better known for his interest in natural history and geology. His family helped to collect and classify his specimens of molluscs, birds, beetles and other fauna, as well as Maori artefacts. His activities extended as far as Kapiti Island, where he became something of an authority on the local birds and fish. Drew supplied specimens to collections throughout New Zealand. He exchanged specimens with Julius von Haast, and on two visits in 1886 and 1888 Andreas Reischek helped to classify his collections. Reischek also trained Drew's son Henry as a taxidermist. Drew published several articles on natural history in the Transactions of the New Zealand Institute, and was made a fellow of the Linnean Society of London in 1897.

As the fame of Drew's collections grew, an increasing number of visitors were drawn to what, since 1880, had become an extensive museum established in the family home. By 1890 the problem of space — both for the collections and Drew's family — had become so acute that Drew proposed selling the collection on condition that it become the nucleus of a public museum. It was valued by Sir James Hector at £1,186 12s., but Drew sold it for about half this amount. Prisoners from the local gaol were used to prepare the site for the museum building at Queens Park. Drew acted as honorary curator, and the task of transferring and arranging the collection occupied six months. The Wanganui Public Museum was opened on 24 March 1895.

Full with future plans and busy in his work, Samuel Henry Drew died from a sudden heart attack at his shop on 18 December 1901; Catherine Drew died in 1925. Drew had made a significant contribution to the life of Wanganui. He was a member of the Harmonic Society and president of the Wanganui Orchestral Club, and also belonged to the Wanganui Rowing Club. He was known as a ready conversationalist, and a man of determined character with 'a genial and humorous temperament.' He is commemorated in a marble bust and memorial tablet in the Wanganui Regional Museum.


Source: Kaye Noble. 'Drew, Samuel Henry - Biography', from the Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 1-Sep-10

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 05, 2012 6:43 am

MARCUS SANDSTEIN

Cashel Street, Christchurch

Sandstein, Marcus, Watchmaker, Jeweller, and Diamond Setter, Cashel Street, Christchurch. Mr. Sandstein established his business in 1862. He died in 1901, but the business is still carried on in his name.

Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Canterbury Provincial District] - 1903 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 06, 2012 10:34 am

ANGUS URQUHART

175, Colombo Street, Christchurch

Urquhart, Angus, Watchmaker and Jeweller, 175 Colombo Street, Christchurch. A native of Inverness-shire, Scotland, where he was brought up to the trade, Mr. Urquhart arrived in the Colony in 1860. His business was established in 1859 by Mr. Carl Asmussen, and has been conducted by the present proprietor almost since his arrival in the Colony.

Source: Source: The Cyclopedia of New Zealand [Canterbury Provincial District] - 1903 - The New Zealand Electronic Text Centre

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