Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 02, 2014 5:10 am

CARL CRONENBURG

4233, Magazine Street, New Orleans


Among the memorial oaks to be planted in Audubon Park in memory of the heroes of New Orleans killed in the war, will be one for A. L. Cronenburg, son of Carl Cronenburg, a jeweler at 4233 Magazine St. Young Cronenburg was employed with A. B. Griswold Co. when he enlisted. He was killed in action.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd April 1919

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 02, 2014 5:42 am

COHEN LOAN & JEWELERY Co.

South Rampart Street, New Orleans


G. M. Stackhouse, jeweler, of St. Mary's Parish, La., has filed a suit against Cohen's Loan & Jewelry Co. in S. Rampart St., for $2,600 damages alleged based upon a trade transaction. Mr. Stackhouse alleges that while in New Orleans he selected two lockets and chains in the Cohen establishment to be laid aside until he sent for them as they were for two customers of Stackhouse. He declares that after he reached home he sent money to the Cohen establishment for the jewelry, but did not receive it and his customers branded him as a fraud. The Cohen company declared that the remittance had never reached them.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd April 1919

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 18, 2014 5:40 am

L. PECK

704, Canal Street, New Orleans


L. Peck, formerly of Atlanta, recognizing the peculiar advantages of New Orleans for the successful conduct of the jewelry business, has opened a store at 704 Canal St., in which he will carry a full line of all articles entering into the jeweler's trade.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th November 1921

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 18, 2014 5:58 am

WILLIAM WEINFERTER

809, Poydras Street, New Orleans


William Weinferter, 809 Poydras St., is increasing his facilities for a more extended business. His jewelry department is carrying a large stock of silverware and ivory goods; besides, he purposes to do something in the way of toys, sporting goods, Christmas cards and novelties, of which he is now receiving quite a supply.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th November 1921

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 18, 2014 6:01 am

EAGLE LOAN & JEWELRY

916, Canal Street, New Orleans


J. Itzkovitch, proprietor of the Eagle Loan Office & Jewelry Store, has leased the store until recently occupied by Solari & Co. at 916 Canal St., where he will conduct an extensive establishment. In addition to his large stock of watches, clocks, diamonds and jewelry Mr. Itzkovitch will also open a leather goods department, which will include a full line of trunks, traveling bags, etc.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th November 1921

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 29, 2014 11:40 am

HARRY KORETZKE

615, Canal Street, New Orleans


New Orleans Police Say Gang Now in Custody Includes Crooks Who Robbed a Jewlery Store in That City

New Orleans, La., Jan. 21.–Five men, all or some of whom, are to be charged with having a part in the attempted robbery of Harry Koretzke's jewelry store and loan office, 615 Canal St., are in jail today in New Orleans. These men are said to be of a band of the most daring bandits who ever operated. Two of the gang have confessed that they and some of their companions robbed the Industrial branch of the Hibernia bank in broad daylight by holding pistols to the two men in the bank and then tying them. Also to the robbing of a branch bank in Algiers, New Orleans, where the bank clerks were locked in the vault. The men under arrest are Rosswell Keyes, Harry Ahearn, W. D. Weston, Robert Holland and one named Skerlock. Leo Stephens and Jack Harvey are being sought in San Antonio, Texas.

When Eugene Fisher, head clerk in Harry's Loan Office on Canal St., reported to the police that three men had entered the store on the morning of Dec. 23 and pointed pistols at him the police seemed to doubt the story and one police reporter wrote the story in an amusing vein as though it never happened. The confession of the bandits, however, now reveals that not only was the story true, but that Fisher acted somewhat of a heroic part. While one man covered Fisher with two guns, another covered him with one, and the third was ready to grab whatever diamonds or jewelry he could. Fisher, however, baffled the men. While covered he slowly retreated and then suddenly ducked behind the counter. When he bobbed up again he had a gun in his hand and the bandits became frightened and ran out of the store. It was the nerve of Fisher that prevented the robbery that might have been extensive, as the store has a large stock of valuable diamonds.

Not only did the confessions reveal that the gang had been implicated in the bank hold-ups and other jobs, but it was related how it was planned to rob the American Express Company of its safe containing $70,000 in gold which was being transported from Chicago to New Orleans. It was this last job that was the undoing of the gang. Railroad detectives obtained a tip, that the express wagon was to be held up en route from the depot of the Illinois Central to the express office and in conjunction with the express detectives and local police, headed by the new Superintendent Guy Maloney, ample forces were secreted near where the wagon was to be held up. The robbery did not take place because some of the band failed to keep the appointment, but the police had learned of the rooming place of two members of the gang. Instead of shooting down the bandits while they were robbing the wagon as was planned, the forces surrounded the house in the vicinity and captured one of the gang. In another house they secured another and gradually five were arrested. Two of those arrested broke down and confessed. Two of the gang got away from the city before the round up.

The gang is said to have operated in Mobile and Baltimore and perhaps other places. None of the gang is over 35 years of age.

As an instance of the nerve of the gang, after an attempt which had been made to open the safe of the Strand Theatre had failed a note was found the next morning, left by the burglars, in which it was stated they were "not amateurs," but their drill had broken.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 26th January 1921

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 03, 2015 5:14 am

GEORGE GEMMING & SON

Commercial Alley and Decatur Street, New Orleans


George Gemming & Son have announced that they will conduct two jewelry stores, one at their present location in Commercial Alley and the other where Philip H. Gemming conducted his business in Decatur St. Philip H. Gemming, who had been for 20 years or more at the Decatur St. location, died November 22 at the age of 68 years. He was a native of New Orleans and unmarried. He leaves two sisters and his brother George, who for some time conducted a jewelry store in Commercial Alley, with his son Philip H. Gemming. Young Gemming will have charge of the store formerly conducted by his uncle while his father will conduct the store in the alley. Philip H. Gemming is an expert artist engraver and has produced some noteworthy specimens of that art.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 10th December 1919

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 03, 2015 5:17 am

GEORGE P. GRISWOLD

327, Carondelet Street, New Orleans


George P. Griswold, who retired from the A. B. Griswold establishment a year or two ago, has again entered the trade. He is now established at 327 Carondelet St., doing an order business exclusively. He handles diamonds, pearls, other gems and fine diamond jewelry. Mr. Griswold had contemplated opening a store but on account of the difficulty of securing a location decided to confine his efforts to an order business.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 10th December 1919

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 07, 2015 7:09 am

JOSEPH R. SCHAEFFER

235, Bourbon Street, New Orleans


ROBBERS LOOT SAFE

Establishment of Joseph R. Schaeffer, New Orleans, La- Visited by Crooks Who Escape with Jewelry and Cash

New Orleans, La.. Dec. 30.–Some time between the hours of 5 P. M. on Christmas Day and 8 A. M. of the following day, robbers succeeded in chiseling off the combination to the big safe in the jewelry establishment of Joseph R. Schaeffer. 235 Bourbon St.. and getting away with about $1,200 worth of jewelry and $700 in cash. Entrance was effected through the back door of the establishment. Mr. Schaeffer's loss, fortunately, is covered by insurance.

He has been in business for himself about two years, having been an employee of Hausmann, Inc. for 11 years. His first venture in business on his own account was under the firm name of Schaeffer & Summers, but he bought out Mr. Summers soon thereafter and has been operating alone ever since.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd January 1923

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 30, 2015 7:23 am

FEITEL JEWELRY Co.

New Orleans


What is believed to be the oldest watchcharm in the world was turned out of the shop of the Feitel Jewelry Co., of New Orleans, recently. This watchcharm is estimated to be about 2,500,000 years old. It consists of a tooth of the Carcharadon Productus, a fish that lived long before man. The tooth is mounted in gold and has a natural luster, like polished flint. Mr. Feitel made the charm for Clement G. Hearsey, secretary of the Board of Public Service Utilities of New Orleans, who is a well-known amateur paleontologist. Mr. Hearsey is now wearing the charm on his watch. According to Mr. Hearsey and other authorities, the Carcliarodon Productus ranged over the earth during a period which began in the miocene and extended through the pliocene, and it evidently inhabited the seas that covered the southern United States. It was a specie of shark and grew to a size from 60 to 70 feet in length. The tooth that Mr. Hearsey possesses was found in the phosphate beds of the Peace River in Florida and is a very fine specimen.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 11th August 1920

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 08, 2015 7:31 am

ABE KORITZKY

Canal Street, New Orleans


George Foerster, 1625 Dryades St., is down with influenza. So is E. L. Jones, 1004 Poydras St., and Abe Koritzky, of Canal St.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd October 1918

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 08, 2015 7:33 am

E.L. JONES

1004, Poydras Street, New Orleans


George Foerster, 1625 Dryades St., is down with influenza. So is E. L. Jones, 1004 Poydras St., and Abe Koritzky, of Canal St.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd October 1918

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 17, 2015 8:30 am

HENRY RODER

New Orleans


Henry Roder, formerly in the jewelry jobbing trade, has entered the jewelry business again and is calling on the trade and selling stocks wholesale.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st December 1920

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 20, 2015 12:31 pm

B.V. GUERRA

611, Common Street, New Orleans


B. V. Guerra has opened a unique establishment at 611 Common St. He has his watch repairing outfit and a small stock on the first floor, and on a mezzanine floor above is his jewelry repairing bench and equipment.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd November 1920

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 20, 2015 12:36 pm

A.N. JACOB

102, St. Charles Street, New Orleans


A. N. Jacob, who was at one time in the employ of P. Stein and also of the De Luce of Paris, has opened a neat little jewelry store at 102 St. Charles St. This location is one of the best in the city.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd November 1920

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 20, 2015 12:39 pm

H. KEIL

307 & 325, Royal Street, New Orleans


Mrs. H. Keil, dealer in jewelry and antiques at 325 Royal St., has opened another establishment at 307 Royal St. in the same square. She is the owner of the building and the former tenant, a Japanese, having moved, it was decided to open another store.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd November 1920

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 25, 2015 4:48 am

FITZGERALD BROTHERS

Baronne Street, New Orleans


Customer of New Orleans Jewelers Obtains Diamond Ring with Bogus Check After He Had Exhibited Bank Deposit Book

New Orleans, La., Dec. 29.–Christmas eve a designing individual, giving his name as "John B. Hallihan," visited the jewelry establishment of Fitzgerald Bros, on Baronne St. Hallihan said he was an attorney connected with the claim department of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, in Louisville. He was just in receipt of a notice, however, that he had been transferred to New Orleans, which would henceforth be his home. To Edward Fitzgerald, the president of Fitzgerald Bros., Hallihan showed letters of introduction purporting to come from prominent members of the Knights of Columbus in Louisville. These letters were addressed to members of the grand lodge of that order in New Orleans, among them being one addressed to Emile Wagner, Grand Knight of Council 714. As further evidence of the genuineness of his representations, he wore a K. of C. pin, posing as a fourth-degree knight, and seemed remarkably familiar with the workings and personnel of that order in Louisville and elsewhere.

During the course of conversation he remarked that he was transferring his bank account from Louisville to New Orleans, and asked for information as to the most trustworthy of such institutions here. The Citizens' Bank was mentioned in this connection, and "Hallihan" calling there soon returned to Fitzgerald Bros', establishment and exhibited his deposit book showing that he had opened a check account of $1,400 at the bank named. Then followed some more talk about the K. of C. and kindred matters, and incidentally he touched upon the subject of jewelry.

He had just been shown, he said, a very unique K. of C. pin at the establishment of A. B. Griswold & Co., described the pin, and expressed a desire to obtain its counterpart. But Mr. Fitzgerald could not duplicate the insignia, and "Mr. Hallihan," as evidence of good faith and disposition to trade, said he would be satisfied with a piece of jewelry which he would present to his wife as a Christmas present. Looking around the establishment his attention was centered on a very pretty solitaire ring, which he selected at a cost of $150, plus the war tax, giving in payment therefor a check on the Citizens' Bank.

Scarcely had this transaction been consummated, when one of the clerks of the Citizens' Bank 'phoned Fitzgerald Bros, for some confidential information regarding "Hallihan." Edward Fitzgerald replied that he knew absolutely nothing about the man beyond what has already been stated. Then the bank officials did some telegraphing, and in 30 minutes after "Hallihan" walked out of Fitzgerald Bros, with the diamond ring, the jewelry firm was telephoned again to the effect that the check "Hallihan" deposited with them was on a bank in Kansas City, although "Hallihan" had represented to Fitzgerald. Bros, that his bank account was in Louisville. "Hallihan" wanted to check against his account at the Citizens' Bank at once, but the officials refused, and that was the last seen of "Hallihan," either by Fitzgerald Bros, or the bank. The bank officials were not prepossessed with "Hallihan," and regardless of his offer to pledge diamonds to the bank in case his integrity was in any way questioned, declined any courtesies. The bank in Kansas City repudiated "Hallihan."

As far as known, Fitzgerald Bros, were "Hallihan's" only victims here. While the amount of his deception was only $157.50, the expose of the man and his methods are of the utmost importance, for it is evident that he is an expert in his line. Fitzgerald Bros, immediately notified the other local jewelers, as well as the authorities; also the Knights of Columbus, who telephoned that "Hallihan" was an imposter.

"Hallihan" is described as an entertaining conversationalist, 5 feet 6 inches in height, weight 132 pounds, age between 32 and 34 years, stylishly dressed, sallow complexion, sunken cheeks; wears a fourth-degree Knights of Columbus pin. Mr. Fitzgerald thinks he had a defective finger, but cannot recall which finger or whether it was the right or the left hand.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 4th January 1922

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 08, 2015 4:06 am

GEORGE HEYL

New Orleans


Heyl Sought a Gas Leak with a Lighted Match

New Orleans, La., Sept. 13.—An explosion occurred last week in the window oi Heyl's store, scattering the goods displayed into the street. There was a leak in the gas in the window of the store, and George Heyl tried to find the leak. To do so he used lighted matches. He found the leak, the gas caught fire, and then an explosion, and Mr. Heyl got cut on the neck slightly. All of the jewelry was recovered, and Mr. Heyl was attended to by a physician.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 20th September 1899

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri May 08, 2015 3:49 am

LOUIS MICHAELIS

300, Royal Street, New Orleans


Death of Louis Michaelis

New Orleans, La., Aug. 20.—Louis Michaelis, a well known jeweler and pawnbroker of this city, died Friday at his home after an illness of three months.

Mr. Michaelis was born in Austerlitz, Germany, 70 years ago, and came to this country when a young man. He had been a resident of New Orleans since 1854 and during the early part of his career was engaged in the furniture trade. He left this business, however, to open a jewelry store in partnership with Charles Boster, finally succeeding to the business, which he continued alone. At the time of his death the store was located at 300 Royal St. Mr. Michaelis was married 38 years ago to Miss Sarah Oppenheimer. His widow and seven children survive him.

The deceased was prominent in secret and benevolent associations, being a member of the Knights of Honor, New Orleans Lodge No. 2515, the B'nai B'rith, the Jewish Widows and Orphans' Home Association, the Touro Infirmary Benevolent Association and the Cosmos Club.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 27th August 1902

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Thu May 14, 2015 3:49 am

GUSTAVE DAUBOIN

1034, Royal Street, New Orleans


A Sensation Caused by Lot of Fake Jewelry and Assault Upon a Jeweler

New Orleans, La., Jan. 18.—What appeared to be a sensation subsequently proved a tempest in a teapot. Early last Friday morning Capt. John Day, commanding the Third Precinct, with two detectives, visited the home and business place of Gustave Dauboin, jeweler, who claimed to have been assaulted, robbed and chloroformed shortly after 1 o'clock on Thursday. The place was 1034 Royal St. The object of their visit was to see what condition the old man was in, and if he could give a more lucid account of the assault and robbery. The officers found him very feeble and weak and his mind far from clear. There is no question that the jeweler had lost a great deal of blood. He said that when he woke up and found he had been wounded in the head and was bloody he called for help and that two ladies who reside upstairs ran to his assistance and called a physician. These ladies told him that they had heard no noise, nor had they seen anyone about the premises. He further said that notwithstanding his condition he had made a partial investigation of his stock and there was missing a cat's-eye ring set with diamonds, a gold ring set with small diamonds, a large ring with garnet setting, several gold plated bangles, several gold plated rings. two double case gold plated watches, one large silver watch, six old watches, two gold scarf pins, seven studs, one amethyst ring, one ring crossed hands, a watch chain, gold and silver, all valued at $154.

Dauboin said he thought that there was more property missing, but he was too feeble to go over his stock carefully and check it up. This information had hardly been flashed over the wires to Acting Superintendent Journee when a telephone message was sent to the Jackson Square station by A. Pearce, who keeps a second hand store at 600 Dauphine St., and who is a brother-in-law of Mr. Dauboin, that there was a crowd of suspicious characters at the corner of Toulouse and Dauphine Sts., who had tried to sell him a lot of jewelry and he had recognized some of it as having been the property of Dauboin. Officers were at once sent to the scene. The men were arrested and gave their names as John King, L. C. Calloway, Thos. Kelly, Wm. Parent. Chas. Tracy, John Wilson, Louis Morgan, Charles F. Cross, Jas. Dawson and Jas. Wilson. They were charged with being dangerous characters. Mr. Dauboin looked at the jewelry recovered, said it was fake jewelry, and that it was not a part of the property stolen from him. After the arrest Pearce denied that he had said that the prisoners had tried to sell him any jewelry. He said that one of the prisoners dropped a heart locket on the banquette and when he picked it up he thought it belonged to his brother-in-law, Dauboin.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 25th January 1899

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