Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 29, 2014 4:31 am

C.M. CHURCHILL

311, St. Charles Street, New Orleans


C. M. Churchill, engraver, watchmaker, and jeweler, who at one time was in the employ of J. J. Weinfurter's Sons, has set up his bench at 311 St. Charles St., for himself.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 12th December 1917

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 29, 2014 4:36 am

AUGUST ROYERE

1454, North Clairborne Street, New Orleans


August Royere, 1454 N. Clairborne St., has found it necessary to take on additional help to meet the large increase in bench work going to him and his force now consists of five men.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 12th December 1917

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 31, 2014 7:44 am

THOMAS R. CHESTERMAN

Canal Street, New Orleans


The jewelry store recently established by Thomas R. Chesterman on Canal St. was sold out at auction recently.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 27th August 1919

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 02, 2014 5:05 am

G.M. CHURCHILL

421, Royal Street, New Orleans


G. M. Churchill, who recently was of the firm of Churchill & Dowling, is now in business for himself at 421 Royal St.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 11th June 1919

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 11, 2014 3:53 am

R.D. CUETO

913, Claiborne Street, New Orleans


R D. Cueto, who was with the A. B. Griswold Co., New Orleans, La., for more than seven years, and recently established at 913 Claiborne St., is enjoying a good trade in his new location.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 5th February 1919

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 18, 2014 4:41 am

A. KERTH

New Orleans


A. Kerth, watchmaker, has established a shop in the store of the Samuel Hart Jewelry Co., or rather where the store was. The Hart Jewelry Co. is now about closed out, the stock having been sold and the fixtures are for sale. Mr. Hart will continue a loan business.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 22nd June 1921

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Thu Sep 18, 2014 4:44 am

HERBERT K. SMITH Co., Inc.

611, Canal Street, New Orleans

Herbert K. Smith, for many years manager of White Bros, has resigned and organized the Herbert K. Smith Co., Inc., to handle jewelry. The company has a capital stock of $100,000 and is located at 611 Canal St. Mr. Smith made a good record with White Bros. Co., and besides his connection with that firm has other large interests. He is now acting as receiver for the Sinclair Motors Co. and some time since purchased a small farm just outside the city.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 22nd June 1921


Nelson P. Lambert, for 11 years with White Bros. Co., New Orleans, La., as head salesman, and Otto H. Ahten, platinum worker and diamond setter, who was with Wm. Frantz & Co. for 11 years and for three years with White Bros. Co., have joined the organization of Herbert K. Smith. Inc., 611 Canal St., New Orleans.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 12th October 1921


The new firm of Herbert K. Smith, Inc., 611 Canal St., has one of the most attractive jewelry establishments in New Orleans; and for a concern only a month old, has done and is doing a wonderful business. Handsome mahogany fixtures, plate glass mirrors and a thoroughly upto-date equipment in other respects attract the eye of the visitor. Arrangements are now being perfected for the erection of the handsomest display signs in the city, to cost $3,500. A long lease of the building will enable the lessees to keep abreast of the times in improvements. The second floor is to be devoted entirely to a manufacturing department, which will be one of the most elaborately fitted in the city. An elevator will eventually be installed connecting all the floors and enabling the upper floors to be utilized for the display of silver, cut glass and clocks. Associated with Mr. Smith, who has been vice-president and general manager of White Bros, for eight years, there are several other men of repute in their respective lines,prominently among whom are Nelson P. Lambert, who for 11 years was secretary of White Bros., and Otto H. Ahten, connected with William Frantz & Co. for 12 years, and three years treasurer of White Bros. H. W. Thompson, well known to the trade, and with Broadnax, of Memphis, for years, is also connected with Herbert K. Smith. Mr. Ahten, with the same firm, is an expert platinum worker and diamond setter. The firm operates on a strictly cash basis.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th November 1921


Herbert K. Smith, of Herbert K. Smith, Inc., and Mrs. Smith, have returned from a trip extending over a period of three weeks, during which they visited New York and many other cities in the east and west. Both have greatly enjoyed their trip.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd May 1922


Herbert K. Smith, Inc., 611 Canal St., with its usual enterprise, has installed the DeForest wireless receiving set in his establishment, attached to which is a large magnavoice horn, a departure in which they are the pioneers among local jewelers. On the roof of their establishment is a six-wire aerial, covering the entire length of the building, which affords a splendid receiving capacity. Saturday last the store was crowded with people to witness the operation of this remarkable invention. Concerts from Loyola University and from other local institutions were heard and greatly enjoyed at the establishment of Herbert K. Smith, Inc.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 31st May 1922


Ralph S. Hereford, formerly secretary of H. K. Smith, Inc., in behalf of himself and his associates, composed of the other members of the old firm, has purchased the stock and good-will of Herbert K. Smith, the senior member, and with the assistance of the other members, will conduct the business as heretofore. Mr. Smith has two or three inventions relating to jewelry devices which are very highly spoken of, and which he is anxious to place upon the market at as early a day as possible. To accelerate action in the way of obtaining the necessary patent, he is going to Washington at once and give this matter his personal attention. It is for this reason that he was induced to withdraw from the firm, of which he was the head and the founder, and which is doing an excellent business. The firm name will be retained and all the old members, with the exception of Mr. Smith, will remain. Under the reorganization, Ralph S. Hereford is to be the president; H. C Weinzettel, vice-president; Nelson P. Lambert, secretary, and Otto H. Alsten, treasurer. Ralph S. Hereford is only 26 years of age. The present is the first experience he has had in the jewelry business, having previously been employed as a public accountant. In his new occupation he will look after the finances of the concern principally, the other members, who are practical jewelers, looking after the practical end of the concern. It might be mentioned, however, that for nearly a year Mr. Hereford has been the secretary of the firm, and, of course, during that time acquired a good deal of practical knowledge of its affairs. Since the reorganization of the firm, Mr. Hereford, and in fact all its members, have been congratulated upon their good luck in acquiring so valuable a piece of business property as that of Herbert K. Smith. In taking over the stock, additional capital was invested in the company.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 27th December 1922

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 20, 2014 4:33 am

H.J. JACOMO

Bourbon Street, New Orleans


H. J. Jacomo, engraver in Bourbon St., is seriously ill with influenza. He was taken to a local sanitarium and is reported to be in a dangerous condition.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 29th January 1919

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 20, 2014 4:35 am

JACOB YOUNG

2134, Magazine Street, New Orleans


Jacob Young, 2134 Magazine St, reported to the police that a show window in his store was broken last week and that the thieves succeeded in obtaining 60 silver rings and other articles. Two stores in the vicinity have suffered from similar visits recently and the work is thought to be that of a local gang.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 29th January 1919


Jewelry valued at about $300 and a plateglass window valued at $200 represent the damage done to the store of Jacob Young. Magazine St., near Jackson Ave., by a thief who smashed the window one night recently. John Crotty, a youth of 16 years, and Emile Sarremea, 21 years, are under arrest charged with the burglary.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd November 1920

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 26, 2014 4:20 am

AL NEWHAUSER

New Orleans


Al Newhauser has been notified that he must vacate the premises he now occupies as a manufacturing jewelry factory, as the building has been sold. He will move Oct. 1, but has not yet found a location.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 16th June 1920

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 26, 2014 4:22 am

ISADORE ANTIS

930, Canal Street, New Orleans


More jewelers of New Orleans are purchasing real estate this year than ever. The last purchase recorded was that of I. Antis, who has bought a building at 1248 Canal St. This property was bought for investment and will not be occupied by Mr. Antis as a jewelry store.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 16th June 1920


TOKEN COINS SEIZED

Federal Agent Visits New Orleans Jeweler, Buys Souvenirs and Hales Jeweler to Court

New Orleans, La., Jan. 26.–Isadore Antis, jeweler at 930 Canal St., had a no less distressing than remarkable experience the other day. For years Mr. Antis has been carrying in stock quite a supply of what is known to the trade as "coin" or "token" souvenirs, bought from a dealer in Los Angeles, Cal. These coins are of about 10 karat gold, and while in some respects they resemble United States money, are very much lighter–not being thicker than an ordinary sheet of paper–and the inscription and image thereon very different to the image and inscription on government coin. They are, however, marked in demoninations of $1, 50 cents and 25 cents; and for that reason and because of their resemblance in other respects to United States coin, the Federal government has prohibited traffic in them, a fact with which Mr. Antis was not acquainted until he paid $10 the other day for the information.

Last week a well dressed gentleman after inspecting some of these very attractive coins as displayed in Mr. Antis' show window, walked into Mr. Antis' store and bought two of them, paying one dollar for one and fifty cents for the other. Nothing was said then but two days later the customer called again at Mr. Antis' store, displayed his official badge, that of a United States government agent, carried away with him all the coins or tokens in the jeweler's stock, telling him he would send for him in a day or two. In other words, Mr. Antis was under arrest for having in his possession 29 souvenir tokens, or coins, of the denomination of $1; 43 of 50 cents; and 76 of 25 cents denomination.

In the United States Court before which Mr. Antis was summoned, he pleaded ignorance of any law prohibiting the sale of the coins or tokens in question; said he had bought them in good faith and with no intent of fraud; that he had been selling them for years and that nothing had at any time been said or intimated either by the federal, State or city authorities to indicate that he was violating a United States statute. He thought in the circumstances he should not be made to suffer for his act, but Judge Foster of the United States Circuit Court thought differently; thought it was necessary to make an example of somebody and as he, Mr. Antis, had been caught in the act of disposing of these coins or tokens, he must suffer; and thereupon he assessed a fine of $10 against the jeweler.

It is said other jewelers carried a stock of these tokens or coins but quickly put them out of sight when Mr. Antis was haled into court.

Mr. Antis was given to understand that the case of the Los Angeles manufacturer would be looked into and that Mr. Antis need not pay the Los Angeles man, if he had not already done so, for the coins or tokens seized. As Mr. Antis had not already settled for them he is relieved to that extent.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st February 1922


Last Wednesday, Judge Dowling sentenced Albert L. M. Gross, alias "Gordon," alleged diamond thief, to from two to three years in State prison, following a plea of guilty. Gross confessed that he had seized three diamond rings worth $1,400 at Antis' jewelry shop, 930 Canal St., some weeks ago. Only recently Gross was detected in an attempt to escape from the Parish Prison, using a rope fashioned of blankets from the bunk in his cell. He was grabbed while making an effort to scale a 22-foot wall.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd May 1922

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 26, 2014 4:25 am

M.J. ROSENTHAL

Baronne Street, New Orleans


M. J. Rosenthal has leased the property in the Chess, Checkers and Whist Club building formerly occupied by "The Smile" saloon and will open there a first-class jewelry store. It is said that the lease calls for $6,000 per annum. Mr. Rosenthal has also purchased the jewelry establishment of John C. Meyer & Son on Decatur St., opposite the old United States mint building. It is said that $35,000 was involved in this transaction. Mr. Rosenthal was formerly one of the owners of the New Orleans Pledge and Jewelry Co.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 16th June 1920


M. J. Rosenthal has taken possession of the store on Decatur St., formerly occupied by J. C. Meyer & Son, which was purchased recently, and is now conducting the business.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th June 1920


M. J. Rosenthal & Co., Baronne St., had a striking window decoration last week as an advertisement to the "Jollies of 1921" and minstrel show of the Shriners. The window scene was a desert picture. White sand covered the floor and toy camels stood and kneeled and in the center was an oasis with a pool represented by a mirror. The Shriners' paraded on the opening day of the show with their camels "Bubbie" and "Babette" and the baby camel born on Easter Sunday.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 18th May 1921

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 28, 2014 4:35 am

BENJAMIN HABERMAN

423, Macheca building, Canal Street, later, 105, University Place, New Orleans


Benjamin Haberman, jobber, who recently made a voluntary surrender of his property for the benefit of his creditors, now that his affairs have been satisfactorily adjusted, has made a fresh start. Mr. Haberman has opened up a new establishment, 423 Macheca building, Canal St. The assets of the old business, consisting of jewelry, diamonds, fixtures, etc., which were disposed of at public auction some weeks ago, netted more than $5,000. There is still an additional $3,000 to collect, which will be divided among the creditors. During the same month in which his failure was announced, Mr. Haberman paid in liquidation of outstanding bills a sum exceeding $7,000. He came to New Orleans from New York three years ago, where he had been operating in the jobbing line, just as he is here.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 21st June 1922


B. Haberman vacated his quarters in the Macheca building in Canal St., on Sept. 1, having leased a more commodious building at 105 University Place, near Canal St. This will enable Mr. Haberman to increase his stock and his facilities for doing a bigger business.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th September 1922

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 28, 2014 4:42 am

WALDHORN & Co.

343, Royal Street, New Orleans


In the big show window of Waldhorn's establishment, 343 Royal St., among many beautiful things, is to be seen an especially unique specimen of vanity box, or antique make-up receptacle, which is just now attracting much attention. This box, which is of 20 karat gold, measures two and one eighth inches in length; in width, one and five-eighths of an inch; three-quarters of an inch in depth, and weighs 65 pennyweights, or three and one-quarter ounces. The box is of the Louis XVI period–date 1776, the year of the Declaration of American Independence. Exteriorly, it presents an exquisite appearance, being beautifully hand chased, with rich relief work in green gold. The face of the lid is surrounded by an oblong border of laurel leaves and roses, most artistically executed. In the center rises a column, from the top of which flame is issuing. At one side of the column is a basket of flowers with a bow-knot top. Within the box is a compartment for the rouge, also a brush with a gold handle, the lid serving as a background for the mirror, and the bottom, which likewise contains a mirror, is spaced for the powder.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 21st June 1922


There is on exhibition in the show window of Waldhorn & Co., 343 Royal St., a very beautiful solid silver vase, weighing over 400 ounces. It is of the grape and vine design, and of the early Victorian period. It was evidently the property of an English nobleman, being surmounted by a crown with a monogram executed in such an involved and complicated manner that it is impossible to make it out. There is also a motto in Latin, reading: Semper mota fides, the latter inscribed on the base of the vase. The base is of exquisitely chaste silver, as is every part of this beautiful vase. Vines with clusters of grapes are in profusion all over it, and the handles are made in the form of twisted vines. It has two linings, one of red, and the other of white glass. The vase, including its base, measures 23 inches in height. The same firm, also, has an exquisite bronze, once forming part of the Thomas B. Lawson collection, entitled, the "Watchers," by Anna V. Hyatt. The figures, a pair of lions, are in a crouched position upon a huge rock, their powerful muscles outlined beneath their hides. The circumstances that tends to render this bronze of additional value is that it was one of the first castings of Anna V. Hyatt's famous "Animal Group."

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 7th November 1923

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 30, 2014 4:42 am

GEORGE A. RAY

Audubon Building, later, 223, Bourbon Street, New Orleans


George A. Ray, formerly located in the Audubon building, is now established with a small stock and a general watch and jewelry repair establishment at 223 Bourbon.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th October 1918

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 30, 2014 4:45 am

DELUXE OF PARIS - DELUCE OF PARIS

914, Canal Street, New Orleans


Lloyd G. Mehlig, manager of the De Luce of Paris of New Orleans and the Lloyd Jewelry Co., New York, has been drafted. Mr. Mehlig claimed exemption on account of his large business, but it was denied and he was also denied the extension of time he asked.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 14th December 1917


Frank Mehlig is now well established in the new De Luxe of Paris store, 914 Canal St. The store, though smaller than at the former location, is handsomely furnished.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th October 1918

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 30, 2014 4:46 am

RICHARD M. TUSCH

New Orleans


Richard M. Tusch announces that he will discontinue doing an installment business and will sell only for cash from now on.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th October 1918

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 30, 2014 4:49 am

MORAIS-HILLER JEWELRY Co.

Suite 304, Godchaux Building, New Orleans


Image
Morais-Hiller Jewelry Co., Inc. - New Orleans - 1918


J. Burnheim, traveling for the Morais-Hiller Jewelry Co., has recovered from an attack of influenza.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd October 1918



Adrien Morais, of the Morais-Hiller Jewelry Co., is down with influenza but is said to be on the road to recovery.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th October 1918



A. J. Morais, of the wholesale jewelry house of Morais & Hiller Jewelry Co., Inc., in the Godchaux building, who has been quite ill for several days, has so far improved that he expects to be back on the job in a day or two.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 31st May 1922



Horace Simon, Texas representative of the Morais & Hiller Jewelry Co., Inc., returning from that State reports that in spite of the swollen conditions of the streams in the eastern portion of the State, which has done considerable damage in the way of inundating large areas of fertile lands, the people are confident of good crops and that there will be a prosperous Fall trade.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 31st May 1922

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Thu Oct 02, 2014 4:09 am

ANTON & RICHARDS

127, Carondelet Street, New Orleans


With flowers and congratulations of friends a jewelry store was opened in New Orleans recently. It is the store of Anton & Richard, 127 Carondelet St. J. C. Richards and Samuel Anton, Jr., both young men well known in the jewelry trade, opened their new store on May 7. The store though small is modern and handsomely furnished. Bouquets of flowers expressed the good will of friends.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 18th May 1921

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 13, 2014 4:11 am

W.E. TAYLOR Co.

New Orleans


W. E. Taylor Co. has four of his force down with influenza and is rushed with orders.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd October 1918



W. E. Taylor has been confined to his home by illness for nearly two weeks. Fortunately E. P. Mugnier, manager of the material department, arrived home after a long trip on the road, in time to take charge of the establishment during the illness of Mr. Taylor.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd April 1919



W. E. Taylor is still confined to his home by illness, and his physician believes that it may be a month before he can return to work.

-------

Advices have been received that W. D. Cleary, of the W. E. Taylor Co., enlisted, is now on his way home from France and will soon resume his position.

.......

Vic Lizana, formerly with the W. E. Taylor Co., has made arrangements to resume his old position to help out in the rush of business during the illness of Mr. Taylor.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 7th May 1919


W. E. Taylor, of the W. E. Taylor Co., Inc., is home and attending business after two weeks' sojourn in company with Mrs. Taylor on the Gulf Coast.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th September 1922

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