Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 13, 2014 4:14 am

D.H. HOLMES Co.

New Orleans


The D. H. Holmes Co. department store, which has a large jewelry department, showed its patriotism recently in its reply to a letter received from a local organization seeking to find jobs for returned soldiers. Across the face of a letter the Holmes company received, it replied: "We will give each one a better job, or the same old job with better pay, and be as proud of him as every member of his family is."

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 7th May 1919

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 15, 2014 4:09 am

G. MICHAELIS & Co., Inc.

Strand Building, New Orleans


G. Michaelis & Co., Inc., will be the new style of the jewelry and loan establishment in the Strand building, formerly known as G. Michaelis & Co. Articles of incorporation were filed during the past week.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st May 1918

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 15, 2014 4:13 am

HAUSMANN Inc.

New Orleans


Hausmann, Inc., recently completed for a local physician a job that taxed the skill and ingenuity of their silversmiths. The job was the building of a case for a surgical instrument used in operations. Rudolph Miller, silversmith, succeeded in making the case to the satisfaction of the physician. The surgical instrument is an apparatus used for boring and cutting bones. The physician wanted a case so that the entire instrument could be sterilized. It was necessary to fit the case, which was made of composition metal, about the instrument so that the whole could be sterilized under high temperature. This was the task that the Hausmann. Inc., silversmiths, accomplished.

With a fine record of high class business and progressive steps the T. Hausmann & Sons, Ltd., was reorganized recently and will in future be known as "Hausmann, Inc." The Hausmann store at 135 Baronne St. is one of the largest and finest in the south, having an extensive stock an efficient corps of salesmen and a large shop occupying as much space as the store in the ground floor and also the second floor upstairs. In the reorganization the concern is capitalized at $300,000. Louis Hausmann is president of the new corporation, Gabe Hausmann, first vice-president, and Henry Hausmann, secretary-treasurer. Mrs. T. Hausmann is second vice-president. The large shops in which have been installed recently some of the finest up to the minute machinery is under the direction of Louis D. Fincke and Alphonse Mandot is assistant manager of the retail department. The Hausmann store was founded in 1870 by Henry Hausmann, establishing the business at 818 Poydras St. The good record of fair dealing and promptness and efficiency brought prosperity to the concern and some three years ago it was moved to its present location.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 14th November 1917


Hausmann, Inc., recently made a magnificent badge, presented to Capt. Jules Alberts of the police force by his friends of the Ninth Ward. The badge is of 14-karat gold, with a large diamond in the star. In the pin is the captain's initials of diamonds set in platinum. The pin can be worn separate from the badge as a scarf pin.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st May 1918


Hausmann, Inc., has seven of its employes suffering from influenza. Abe Hausmann is enjoying a short stay at Asheville, N. C, with his family.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd October 1918


Hausmann, Inc., recently designed a unique service pin which was presented to a negro preacher of Rayville, La. (his name was not stated in the order), for having 12 sons in the United States army and a daughter in the Red Cross service. It was necessary to get in 13 stars. Among the sons were two sets of twins and one of triplets. So Hausmann, Inc., designed a pin in this style. A center star stands for the daughter in the Red Cross. Five stars on a curved bar below are for the five sons born alone. Next are two bars, each with two stars for the two sets of twins. The last is a longer bar with three stars to represent the triplet heroes. The letter received by Mr. Hausmann contained only an order for a pin, and while it stated the facts it did not contain the name of the honored father. The pin and letter were placed in the show window.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd October 1918


Henry Hausmann, secretary of the Louisiana Retail Jewelers' Association, has just returned from a visit to the Orient. Mr. Hausmann was absent four months, during which time he visited Japan, the Philippines, China and Honolulu.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st December 1920


Leo R. Straus, well known to the jewelry trade, formerly of New York and well known in New Orleans as the son-in-law of Louis Hausmann, has decided to make his home in New Orleans. He has taken possession of the residence 4030 Carondelet St. His father, A. R. Straus, will live with him. Mr. Straus will maintain his office in New York.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st December 1920


Hausmann, Inc., had the honor of supplying the watch that was presented to President-Elect Harding by the Elks when he was in New Orleans Nov. 18. The watch was an 18 karat gold Patek Philipp.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st December 1920


Hausmann, Inc., has been favored with an order for five medals, prizes to be awarded to the most expert members of the police force who will compete in revolver shooting contest to occur Sunday next. The prizes are of gold, silver and three of bronze, all handsome both in design and in finish.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th November 1921


The wife of Bernard Barry, of Hausman, Inc., died last week. Mrs. Barry was a woman of most attractive personality and was greatly beloved.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th November 1921


It has been the custom of Hausmann, Inc., manufacturing jewelers, for some years to decorate their big show window on Baronne St. with some design suggestive of the season. This year the one adopted is attracting a good deal of attention and receiving many compliments. It is entitled "The Milano," and closely follows the correct lines of the Italian Renaissance. In producing this display the artists have studied the details most carefully, pursued the architectural lines and have given the proper proportion to each separate piece. The important feature of this display is the background, which is a small reproduction of a cathedral. It is composed of a half dome interior, surrounding an altar. At either side are wings, representing shrines or chapels. These wings are constructed in panels with four recesses deep enough to hold the La Vallier blocks made in the shape of book rests. Directly in front of each recess, of which there are four, a miniature Renaissance table, the proper size for wrist watches or bar-pins, may be placed. The designers have managed to maintain a soft, conservative color scheme in this set, which speaks elegance rather than garishness. Two beautiful handpainted cards, accompany this set.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th November 1921


Gabe Hausmann, of Hausmann Inc., who has been spending the past two weeks with his family at Atlantic City, planned to be in New York Sept. 1, remaining there several days before returning home.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th September 1922


Henry Hausmann attended the national convention at Cincinnati, to which he was appointed a delegate by the State association last week.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th September 1922


Joseph S. Haydel, one of the popular salesmen of Hausmann, Inc., was married on Oct. 23 to Miss Anna Gans, of this city. The bride and groom are spending their honeymoon over the lake.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st November 1922


Hausmann Inc. is very busy just now in the factory making college rings and pins for the private schools of the city. The concern has also made three plates for the Austrian minister, which are to be put in pictures to go one to Gen. Pershing, one to Col. Moffet. and one to Commander MacNider of the American Legion convention.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st November 1922

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 21, 2014 4:37 am

VILLNER & GAUTREAUX

Rampart Street and 104, Carondelet Street, New Orleans


Villner & Gautreaux, composed of L. Villner and G. Gautreaux have purchased the little store formerly known as the Jewel Box, at 104 Carondelet St., and are conducting it prosperously. The firm now controls three stores, two being on Rampart St.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 20th July 1921


Villner & Gautreaux, expert jewelers, watch repairers, etc., have opened a new store on Canal St., which is now being fitted up for their various purposes. Originally they were at 10 Carondelet St., an establishment which they have largely outgrown. With the Canal St. store the firm can now boast of three stores in New Orleans–one at 626 S. Rampart St., managed by D. Villner, and the second at 350 S. Rampart St., in charge of Henry Castang. The junior member of the firm was formerly in business in Bay City, Tex., but in enlisting for service in the late war, was at its close induced to settle in New Orleans.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th November 1921

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 21, 2014 4:40 am

CHALMETTE JEWELRY Co.

Godchaux Building, New Orleans


C. P. Cottrell and A. R. Languner have formed a jewelry establishment under the style of the Chalmette Jewelry Co. and have opened offices in the Godchaux building. They are doing a general jewelry instalment business. Both were formerly in the jewelry business.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 20th July 1921

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 21, 2014 1:58 pm

BERNARD LIVINGSTON

104, Carondelet Street, New Orleans


The Jewel Box is the name of the latest jewelry store established in New Orleans; It occupies a small place in 104 Carondelet St., but is handsomely fitted in modern style. Bernard Livingston is the proprietor of the new store.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 25th August 1920


Bernard Livingston, New Orleans, La., is offering creditors 20 cents on the dollar in settlement of their claims.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 4th May 1921


Bernard Livingston, 26 years old, a native of Baltimore, Md., and former jeweler of New Orleans, La., who is under indictment on the charge of assaulting and robbing Max Berenstein, a jewelry broker, of diamonds valued at $140,000 has been released on bail. Through habeas corpus proceedings brought by counsel for Livingston, who has denied the charges made against him, the prisoner was brought before Judge Stump of the Supreme Bench and the jurist directed that Livingston be released on a bond of $30,000 pending trial. The bond was furnished and Livingston was released. Frank L. Allers who was also indicted in the Berenstein robbery was unable to obtain bail and is now held in jail here waiting trial.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 31st May 1922

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 25, 2014 10:58 am

J. LUIS MEDAL

135, Exchange Place, New Orleans


J. Luis Medal has opened a watchmaking establishment at 135 Exchange Pl.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd May 1922

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 26, 2014 6:55 am

GEORGE FOERSTER

1623-25 Dryades Street, New Orleans


George Foerster, 1625 Dryades St., is down with influenza. So is E. L. Jones, 1004 Poydras St., and Abe Koritzky, of Canal St.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd October 1918


George Foerster, jeweler, 1623-25 Dryades St., has had a very successful year in his business. This fact is substantially evidenced in a transaction whereby Mr. Foerster has become the owner of the handsome commercial building which he has been occupying for the past 12 years. It is his intention to enlarge and remodel the structure so that a portion of it may be made a revenue producer and leased to other parties. The remaining half of the building he will continue to occupy.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 28th June 1922

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 28, 2014 4:51 am

HEIDENRAICH

New Orleans


E. Waldmeier, Gulf port, Miss., has invented a "Gas-Save" for use in the operation of automobiles, and which is now in general use because of its economical features. He learned his trade with the late Mr. Heidenraich, a well known jeweler of this city.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 31st May 1922

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Thu Oct 30, 2014 5:30 am

J.H. MEDNIKOW

New Orleans


J. H. Mednikow, after taking stock of his losses from the pilferings of a woman now under arrest, finds that about $600 was taken. More than $200 of goods has been recovered from local loan offices and the police are still searching.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 14th November 1917

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 07, 2014 5:28 am

EUGENE BARBIER

308, Royal Street, New Orleans


Jeweler Barbier Wanted to be Either a Well Man or a Dead One

New Orleans. La., Aug. 18.—E. Barbier, jeweler, 308 Royal St., made an unsuccessful attempt to end his earthly career last Wednesday morning. The bullet from an old pistol which he held to his mouth did not crash through his brain as he expected, but lodged in his left cheek, under the eye. He is in no danger of death.

Barbier is considered one of the best known jewelers in this city. He has been in business on Royal St. for many years and it is stated by members of his family that he has always done a satisfactory business and that he had no cause for complaint on this score. They assign sickness as the cause for the attempt at suicide. It was stated that Barbier had been ailing for some days previous and that his illness made him despondent. He was impatient to be a well man again, but he seemed to get no better. He has had an old pistol in his possession for many years. He kept it for the purpose of protecting himself against the invasion of thieves. Barbier's family did not dream that he would attempt to take his life because of his illness. He is 59 years of age and a native of France.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 25th August 1897


E. Barbier, 1869 - Estate of E. Barbier, 1919

Next in age to the Griswold establishment stands that of E. Barbier, 308 Royal St., now conducted by the heirs of Eugene Barbier, who died in 1915. Mr. Barbier succeeded M. Fronier, who established his business in 1840. Both these men were noted clock makers. A clock that M. Fronier made and placed in front of his store in 1842 was only recently taken down. It had a figure of a sailor that struck the hours on a bell.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 5th February 1919

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 07, 2014 5:33 am

AUGUST BAUMANN

St. Mary Market,, later, 1018, Annunciation Street, later, 1825, Magazine Street, New Orleans


Another establishment that existed long before 'The American Horological Journal' was started is that of August Baumann. The business today is conducted by his son, August Baumann, but the elder man is still hale and hearty, although 82 years of age. Mr. Baumann established his business near the St. Mary Market, at the corner of Calliope St., in 1862. That was then a business center of New Orleans, but now much decayed from such. Later he moved to 1018 Annunciation St., where the store was 32 years. It was then moved to 1825 Magazine St., where it has been 23 years. Previous to coming to New Orleans, Mr. Baumann worked in Baton Rouge in the trade. His present store is known for its stock of diamonds, August, the younger, being an expert and frequently selling diamonds to the trade.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 5th February 1919

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 20, 2014 7:02 am

LEOPOLD JANSEN

112, Bourbon Street, later, 707, Canal Street, New Orleans


DEATH OF LEOPOLD JANSEN

Ptomaine Poisoning Carries Off Widely Known and Popular Jeweler of New Orleans

New Orleans, La., May 10–Leopold Jansen, one of the best known and most popular jewelers in New Orleans, died at the Touro Infirmary May 6, after an illness of two weeks. Mr. Jansen's death was caused by ptomaine poisoning, the disease having been contracted, it is believed, through eating a dozen raw oysters. Deceased was 53 years old, and a native of this city. After graduating from the high school, he went to work for Frantz & Opitz, later becoming connected with the firm of Frantz Bros. & Co. Thirty-eight years of his life was spent in the jewelry business, during 22 years of which he was acting for himself. He opened his first establishment at 112 Bourbon St., in the old French quarter, but meeting with remarkable success subsequently removed to 707 Canal St.. where he was still in business at the time of his death.

Mr. Jansen was a member of many social organizations, including the Elks and Chess Club, and was president of the American Homestead Association. Just recently, he had completed a term as president of the New Orleans Retail Jewelers' Association. He leaves a widow, a daughter, one brother and three sisters to mourn his loss.

No member of this community was held in higher esteem than Mr. Jansen. It is not known yet what disposition will be made of his store, whether it will be ordered sold, or whether Mrs. Jansen will conduct it herself. Referring to this subject, Mrs. Jansen, just after the funeral of her husband, said she was wholly inexperienced as a business woman, knew practically nothing about jewelry as an article of commerce, and for that reason would prefer to dispose of that part of Mr. Jansen's estate to someone more competent to handle it. If, however, she was unable to obtain anything like its real value she would, rather than sacrifice the property, take active charge and endeavor to run the establishment herself.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 17th May 1922


The business of the late Leopold Jansen is at present being conducted by Mrs. Jansen, the widow, and Mr. Jansen's brother, under the firm name of Jansen & Jansen. It is the intention, however, to dispose of the business as soon as they can get a satisfactory offer for the stock, etc. The stock and fixtures are of a high class.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th September 1922

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 23, 2014 1:20 pm

MILLER & FELIU

4216, Magazine Street, New Orleans


Another jewelry store has been added to the local trade of New Orleans. Felix Miller, who has been in the jewelry trade for some years and employed by Leonard Krower & Son, and also Morais & Hiller, with H. F. Feliu has opened a store at 4216 Magazine St., under the name of Miller & Feliu. They have a general line.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 25th May 1921

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 24, 2014 6:26 am

J.F. RIVAS

Liggott Building, New Orleans


J. F. Rivas, formerly with Jacob Young, Magazine St., near Jackson Ave., has opened a shop for himself in the Liggott building.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th June 1920

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 24, 2014 6:40 am

H. SCHMIDT & SON

Exchange Place, New Orleans


H. Schmidt & Son, on Exchange Pl, has leased the front office of the floor on which he is now located and will join it with his present space and enlarge his shop to the entire floor. The establishment recently added to its equipment a 6½-inch motordrive roller.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th June 1920

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 25, 2014 5:40 am

DAVID PAILET

449, South Rampart Street, New Orleans


The store of David Pailet, 449, S. Rampert St., New Orleans, La. was broken into one night recently and about $250 worth of jewelry stolen. The thieves gained entrance by crawling through a transom. The authorities have been notified, but as yet no arrest has been made.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th August 1919

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 26, 2014 7:04 am

WILLIAM FRANTZ

142, Carondelet Street, New Orleans


William Frantz, a large retail jeweler at 142 Carondelet St., was born in Germany, but came to this country when very young, and has been a citizen of this country many years. Mr. Frantz demonstrated his loyalty to the United States by making a motion as a member of the Public School Board that President Wilson's recent address to Congress be read to the pupils in all of the higher grades. As president of the German Old Folks' Home he directed that a large United States flag be hoisted from a tall mastpole in the front lawn of the institution.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd May 1917


The death of Mrs. Louisa Kreihs, wife of Gustave H. Kreihs, who has been watchmaker for William Frantz & Co. for more than 40 years, is regretted by a wide circle of friends, who have long admired and esteemed her.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd January 1923

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 28, 2014 2:01 pm

ERNEST A. STUMPF

New Orleans


John Kragsgard, for many years with Ernest Stumpf, of New Orleans, has accepted a position with Wallie Wolsch, of the Howard Watch Co.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 6th September 1922


Ernest A. Stumpf, prominently connected with the jewelry business in New Orleans, who has been desperately ill for some time, is beginning to improve, and his complete recovery is now assured.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd January 1923

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Re: Some Old Jewellers of New Orleans

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 02, 2014 5:07 am

DAVID R. MILLER & BROS.


David R. Miller & Bros., who recently purchased the store of P. M. Stein, 822 Canal St., have closed out their Dryades St. store and also their manufacturing jewelry establishment in the Maison Blanche building and are now conducting only the Canal St. store.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 23rd April 1919

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