Some London Advertisements and Information

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 31, 2013 5:40 pm

HENRY DELOLME

23, later, 48 Rathbone Place, Oxford Street, London, and Paris


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H. Delolme - London - 1851

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H. Delolme - London - 1854


Henry Delolme was born at Brunswick in 1799, the youngest son of watchmaker Antoine Niclas Delolme. He was working in London by 1827. On the 9th January 1829 he married Jane Amelia Labarthe in the Old Church, Saint Pancras, London. He died in 1890.

Henry Delolme exhibited in the Great exhibition at London in 1851.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 12, 2013 4:47 pm

WALTER BOWLES

26, Foubert's Place, Great Marlborough Street, London


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Walter Bowles - London - 1905

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby MCB » Tue Aug 13, 2013 5:40 am

WALTER BOWLES

He was born in Islington around 1864 the son of Alfred a sign writer and painter and his wife Ann.
He married Ada Elizabeth Simmonds at St Andrew, Barnsbury, Islington in 1889.
The 1901 UK Census recorded him as an heraldic engraver living at Beaumont Road, Islington with his wife Ada and 3 children aged 4 to 11 years.
He was out of the engraving business by 1911 when he was listed at 23 Beaumont Road with his three sons all as sign writers.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Aug 13, 2013 12:16 pm

J. BLUNDELL & SONS Ltd.

24, Dean Street, Soho, later, 184, 162, (renumbered to 199) Wardour Street, later, 25, Cross Street, later, 31-35, Leather Lane, London


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J. Blundell - London - 1879


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J. Blundell & Sons Ltd. - London - 1903


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J. Blundell & Sons Ltd. - London - 1946


This business was established in 1839 by John Blundell. The firm's name was restyled to name to J.Blundell & Sons when his two eldest sons, James John and Thomas George joined the business.

John Blundell died in 1904, aged 78 years.

During both world wars Blundell's were converted to manufacture mercury oxide, a highly explosive substance used to ignite detonators, for the war effort.

In the 1920's they acquired the silversmiths, James Newell, of 122 Wardour Street. James Newell had died on the 4th November 1921.

Also in the early 1930's, one of the most noted names in the silver trade during the 19th and 20th centuries, Charles Boyton & Son Ltd., who were still struggling from the effects of the depression, fell into trouble, and were wound up on the petition of J. Blundell & Son Ltd. Blundell's formed a new company, styled Charles Boyton & Son (1933) Ltd, and continued to use the old Boyton's premises at Newman Passage, Newman Street, however, in 1936 they were installed into the old James Newell premises at 122, Waldour Street.

J. Blundell & Son Ltd. were sold in 2003 to Mark Barrett, and are now relocated to 25, St Cross Street, just off Hatton Garden.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 03, 2013 2:25 pm

LONDON & RYDER

17, New Bond Street, London

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London & Ryder - London - 1859

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London & Ryder - London - 1870's

The retail business of London & Ryder was founded in c.1859 by former employees of the business of C.F. Hancock. They took over the business over another Hancock, this one being Thomas, who had been in business at 17, New Bond Street since the 1820's. They were noted as exhibitors at the International Exhibition that was held at London in 1862. London & Ryder were acquired by Finnigans Ltd. of 18, New Bond Street around 1929.


EXTRAORDINARY JEWEL ROBBERY IN LONDON

A robbery, accompanied with violence, has been perpetrated at the west end of London, under very remarkable circumstances. On Thursday, 18th January, about 4 o'clock in the afternoon, a well dressed man alighted from a Hansom cab at the shop of Messrs. London and Ryder, jewellers and goldsmiths, in Bond-street, and, walking in, asked to look at some diamond necklaces and rings, remarking that he had lately come into the possession of some property, and was about to expend £6000 in jewellery. He carefully examined the necklaces and other articles, and then left the shop, giving the name of Mark Tyrrell, and requesting them to be sent to his house, No. 4 Upper Berkely-street, Portman square, at half-past 5 o'clock that evening, in order that they might be shown to a lady. The diamonds he had seen, with others he had not seen, and of the value together of between £5000 and £6000, were carefully packed in a bag, and intrusted to an assistant to be taken to the address stated. Arriving there at the appointed time, the door, to his surprise, was opened, not by a servant, but by Mr. Tyrrell himself, who asked him to walk in, explaining that his servant was absent for the moment upon an errand. The shopman was conducted to the drawing-room, where he found a well-dressed young woman, apparently prepared for his visit. She and Mr. Tyrrell took seats at a table, with the shopman on the opposite side, who then produced the necklaces and rings he had been asked to bring, of the value, together of about £2500, leaving the rest in his bag, which he had placed at his feet on the floor. The lady examined them minutely, and appeared to admire them much. At length, Mr. Tyrrell suggested that she had better bring her sister in to look at them before she decided, and she left the room apparently for that purpose. Returning in a few minutes alone, and going unawares behind the shopman, she stealthily placed a pocket-handkerchief, partly saturated, has he believes, with chloroform, over his mouth, holding it tightly by the ends. The diamonds still lay on the table, and the rest of them were in the bag below. A great struggle immediately ensued, and the shopman was at length completely overpowered. As he lay helplessly exhausted on the floor, partly from the effects of the drug applied to his mouth and nostrils, the man and woman proceeded to pinion his arms by the elbows behind–so, at least, the story goes–and to tie his legs together by the knees and ankles. Bound thus hand and foot, they placed him upon a sofa in the room, the man telling him as they did so that if he dared to stir or speak he would murder him. This would probably be about six o'clock, and he was then left alone, in the room in that helpless plight. How long he remained there is not exactly known; but from what afterwards became known, the interval was probably little short of two hours. Gradually recovering consciousness he managed by slow degrees to release himself, and taking tip a poker, he violently smashed a window of the drawing-room with it, in order to give an alarm. The costly diamonds he had displayed on the table had by this time disappeared, but those he had left in his bag on the floor, and which were almost twice the value of the rest, remained, as good luck would have it–the thieves probably overlooking them in their haste to escape. Making his way down-stair to the street door, the shopman gave an alarm which brought a policeman, and they went over the whole house together, but only to find it completely deserted, and no trace of either the man or woman who had committed the outrage. It was then about 8 o'clock in the evening. While the police and he were so engaged they heard a knock at the front door, and, going there, admitted a woman, who said she was a servant in the house, and who appeared greatly surprised to find it in the hands of strangers. She explained, in effect, that, at about 2 o'clock that day, her master, into whose service she had entered only on the previous day, had sent her with a letter addressed to a lady at Tulse Hill; that she went there accordingly, and spent several hours in trying to find the address of the lady, but altogether in vain and that she had brought back the letter, which she now showed to the shopman and to the constable. The inference from this circumstance is that the man Tyrrell, her master, having deliberately planned the robbery, had sent her on foot to that distant suburb upon a fool's errand, in order to get her out of the way. The woman, who assisted in the robbery, has been apprehended, and the police are on the tracks of the man. Some of the jewellery has been recovered, the woman having sent it to a Miss Goodrich, of Southampton.


Source: Colonist - 28th March 1871


London, July 6.—The rise in the value of pearls in the last few years was emphasized in the King's French Division here last week when Lady Mond, wife of Sir Alfred Mond, the health minister, sued Messrs. London and Ryder, the New Bond St. jewelers, for damages for alleged negligence in cleaning a pearl and diamond necklace in such manner that it was claimed one gem was burned. The claim was for $7,500 and the court awarded this amount with costs since the negligence was not denied by the jewelers. The only point in the dispute was the amount of liability incurred. The pearl in question, a large Oriental drop, valued at $8,500, was placed in a box of sawdust or bran which was warmed at a fire. This was where the negligence came in, it was contended. The sawdust or bran should have been warmed first. What occurred was that sparks from the fire ignited the sawdust and badly scorched the gem. All experts agreed the value of the pearl was not less than $7,500, although its purchase price 24 years ago was $500, according to Lady Mond. Since its damage it was estimated by experts as worth about $1,000. The jewelers had submitted more than 100 different pearls to Lady Mond in the hope she could match the damaged one and replace it. But she said she could not, the drop having come from a royal jewel and was of a pear shape and difficult to substitute. The gem was insured for only $3,500. The court was informed that at the time Lady Mond was presented with the necklace containing the gem in dispute such pearls were not uncommon but that of late years the Oriental pearl fisheries had become exhausted and the value of such pearls had gone up in consequence. Robert Brockman, described in court as a pearl doctor, said he could skin a pearl and alter its appearance. He told the court the plaintiff's pearl showed signs of wear but no sign of discoloration by heat or fire. He could treat it and improve it. In addition to awarding Lady Mond the amount of damages stated the court intimated that the judgment gave Lady Mond the right to the pearl in dispute. Messrs. London and Ryder is one of the best known firms of jewelers and silversmiths in the West-end and enjoy a large connection among the elite of the metropolis.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 20th July 1921

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby MCB » Wed Sep 04, 2013 8:36 am

LONDON & RYDER

Volume I, page 300 of The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths Jewellers & Allied Traders 1839-1914 by John Culme records London & Ryder supplying, amongst other trophies, The Stewards’ Cup and The Chesterfield Cup for Goodwood Races. There is no record of London & Ryder having entered a makers’ mark.
Also named there in connection with the robbery is the jeweller’s assistant James (Unitt) Parkes who went on to open his own jewellery business in 1875 at 12 Vigo Street, Regent Street.
The England & Wales Criminal Registers show Martha Torpey stood trial at the Old Bailey on 27th February 1871 charged with robbery with violence. She was acquitted.
A Michael Torpey was indicted on the same day for a felony but was not in custody and the Court did not reach a verdict.
The marriage of Michael Torpey to Martha Grubb at St James, Westminster in 1870 might be relevant.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 09, 2013 10:18 am

G.M. BETSER & CO.

5, Lower James Street, Golden Square, later, 8 & 9, Great Pulteney Street, Golden Square, London


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G.M. Betser & Co. Ltd. - London - 1946

Established in 1900 as Betser & Marriott (George Mears Betser and Frank Black Marriott), the partnership was dissolved on the 1st July 1905, with George Betser continuing alone and the business styled G.M. Betser & Co.

In 1935 the business was acquired by P.W. Kemp and had relocated to 39, Gerrard Street, and in 1946 the business moved again, this time to 15a, Grafton Street. G.M. Betser & Co. enjoyed a very close working relationship with Aspreys and their staff also worked at Asprey's Bond Street premises so that engraving could be carried out immediately upon purchases made at Aspreys.

In 1981 they were noted at 22, Albemarle Street, London.

Sadly, G.M. Betser & Co. Ltd. have recently ceased their activities.

Some examples of hand engraving by G.M. Betser & Co. Ltd.:


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G.M. Betser & Co. entered their marks 'GM·B·&Co' contained within a lozenge with cut sides, on the 17th October 1906. 'G.M.B' contained within an oval, on the 19th April 1907, and 'GMB' contained within an oblong, on the 5th November 1914, all with the London Assay Office.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 18, 2013 1:01 pm

JAMES ATTENBOROUGH

32, Strand, London

Memorial of a War Horse. Mr. James Attenborough, silversmith, of 32, Strand has recently, by direction of Major Leveson, executed an appropriate memorial of a charger killed under the gallant officer at the battle of Inkermann. Upon the fragment of the shell which was extracted from the body of the animal, is placed a circle of bullets, supporting shot of a larger kind, which are surmounted by a small shell used at the Redan, and worked so as to form an inkstand. The pen is inserted at the fusee aperture. The stopper is a bullet which had grazed the side of the major. A silver shield, surmounted by a crown, is displayed upon the shell, bearing the words, "Alma, Inkermann. Balaklava, Sebastopol," supported by a silver ribbon, inscribed "Crimea." Beneath it is a silver tablet in the form of a tombstone, upon which is inscribed, "To the memory of Desert Born, an Arab charger, which was killed under Major Leveson, at the battle of Inkermann, on the 5th November, 1854." The various bullets, &c, in this memorial were picked up on the various fields of battle in the Crimea.

Source: Daily Southern Cross - 24th March 1857


NOTICE is hereby given, that the following is a copy of an entry made in the book kept by the Chief Registrar of the Court of Bankruptcy for the Registration of Trust Deeds for the benefit of Creditors, Composition and Inspectorship Deeds executed by a Debtor, as required by the Bankruptcy Act, 1861, secs. 187, 192, 194, 196, and 198:–
Number–15,796.
Title of Deed, whether Deed of Assignment, Composition, or Inspectorship–Composition.
Date of Deed–28th December, 1865.
Date of execution by debtor–28th December, 1865.
Name and description of the Debtor, as in the Deed John Keith, of No. 41, Westmorland-place, City-road, in the county of Middlesex. Ecclesiastical Silversmith.
The names and descriptions of the Trustees or other parties to the Deed, not including the Creditors–
James Attenborough, of No. 32, Strand, in the county of Middlesex, Jeweller and Silversmith, and John Bryer, of Nos. 53 and 54, Barbican, in the city of London, Refiner (inspectors), second part; and the creditors, third part.
A short statement of the nature of the Deed–A Deed, by which the debtor covenants with the inspectors that he will, at the expiration of three calendar months from the 1st January, 1866, and of every succeeding period of three calendar months, until the composition of ten shillings in the pound payable to the creditors respectively under such deed, shall have been paid to the creditors, respectively pay to the said inspectors or inspector for the purposes of the said deed the sum of £100; and a release by creditors to debtor.
When left for Registration–24th January, 1866, at halfpast three o'clock.

THE SEAL OF THE COURT


Source: The London Gazette - 26th January 1866

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Oct 06, 2013 10:56 am

JAMES CLOTHIER

121, Pall Mall, London


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James Clothier - London - 1851

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby MCB » Sun Oct 06, 2013 12:20 pm

JAMES CLOTHIER

He was born the son of William, a sawyer and his wife Elizabeth around 1816 and christened James Jenkin Clothier at St Paul, Deptford on 29th September.
No record of an apprenticeship has been found for him.
He married Mary Legg at St James, Westminster in 1841 and was listed in the Census of that year as a silversmith living with his wife at 22 Salisbury Square, St Bride’s parish, London.
The Electoral Register for 1844 listed him at 2 Keppel Terrace, Chelsea and in 1847 at 7 Vine Street, St James, Westminster.
In 1851 he was listed as a watch maker and silversmith living in Deptford with his wife and sons James born in St Bride’s parish, London in 1842 and Edward born in St James parish, Westminster in 1848.
Their son Arthur was christened at St Mary Magdalene, Southwark in 1852 the register showing his father as a silversmith from 9 Portland Place.
The 1861 Census recorded him as a silversmith and jeweller at 121 Pall Mall, St James. His son James (Jenkin) had become his assistant.
He was in the same trade and still at the same address in 1871. His son James had become a dealer in plate, son Edward a shop keeper’s assistant and son Arthur a railway clerk.
Late of 121 Pall Mall he died in Kensington in 1876. His Will was proved for probate on 15th June, his widow Mary and sons James and Arthur, both silversmiths, being named as his executors for an estate valued at £2000.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 22, 2013 1:16 pm

W.H. WALTER

31, Newgate Street, London


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W.H. Walter - London - 1891

This business was established in 1881 as Fowler & Walter, the partnership of Henry Fowler and William Harrison Walter. The partnership was dissolved on the 1st February 1887 and William Harrison Walter continued alone at the same address. Henry Fowler entered into partnership with Frederick William Powell as Fowler & Powell (see above post).

The low point in William Harrison Walter's career came in 1905 when he was forced into a public apology by the Guardians of the Standard Wrought Plate in Birmingham following the uncovering that a batch of reading glasses with silver handles, that had been assayed at Birmingham, that were then applied with the addition of plated mounts.

As Fowler & Harrison, the firm entered their mark 'HF' over 'WHW' contained within an irregular octagonal punch, with the London Assay Office on the 2nd May 1885.

As W.H. Walter, the firm entered their mark 'W.H.W' contained within an oblong punch, at various times between 1888 and 1900, with the London Assay Office.

The firm entered similar marks with the Birmingham and Chester assay offices.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 07, 2013 7:04 pm

THOMAS MORING

10 Gate Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, later, 44, later, 52a, High Holborn, London


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T. Moring - London - 1864


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T. Moring - London - 1871


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Moring - London - 1877


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Thomas Moring - London - 1890

Established in 1791. Thomas Moring's business continues until c.1900.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 10, 2013 1:13 pm

AUGUSTIN McSHANE

13, Edwards Street, Portman Square, London


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Augustin McShane - London - 1851

Successor to Mrs Parker.

Augustin McShane appears to have been born c.1824, at London.

The Bankruptcy Act, 1869.
In the London Bankruptcy Court
In the Matter of Proceedings for Liquidation by Arrangement or Composition with Creditors, instituted by Augustin McShane, of No. 4, Lower Seymour-street, Portman-square, in the county of Middlesex, Jeweller and Silversmith.
FREDERICK GARDNER, of No. 28, Saint Swithin's lane, Cannon-street, in the city of London, Accountant, has been appointed Trustee of the property of the debtor. All persons having in their possession any of the effects of the debtor must deliver them to the trustee, and all debts due to the debtor must be paid to the trustee.
Creditors who have not yet proved their debts must forward their proofs of debts to the trustee.-–Dated this 15th day of June 1871.


Source: The London Gazette - 23rd June 1871

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 22, 2013 8:19 am

FREDERICK NEWLAND SMITH

Manchester and Welwyn Garden City


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Frederick Newland Smith - London - 1957

Frederick Newland Smith was born at Bridgewater, Somerset in c.1882, the son of Oliver Claude Smith, a Photographer. Whist attending the Bridgwater School of Art he was awarded a silver medal in the National Art Competition organised by The Royal College Of Art, South Kensington, in 1904. and later, for 33 years was the head of the gold and silversmithing department at the Manchester School of Art. He married Julie Peterkin on the 17th April 1911 at St John Chrysostom, Rusholme, Lancashire. He served in the First World War with the 1st Battalion, the Honorable Artillery Company in France and Germany.

He was a founder member of the Welwyn Craftworkers Guild having moved there in 1943. He was appointed the Guild's Deputy Master in 1951, and Master in 1952. He died in January 1969.

Amongst his known work is a rose bowl made for the permanent collection of the Manchester Art Gallery, a beaker made for the permanent collection of the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths, London, and a casket in gold, silver, and enamel, that was presented to the Earl of Derby in 1919.

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 24, 2013 11:24 am

MICHAEL MURRAY

An example of the work of Michael Murray, a salt shaker, assayed at London in 1950:


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Michael Murray's obituary written by his second wife, Anne Nicholson:

MICHAEL MURRAY was a poetic craftsman whose material was metal. His lifelong smiting of silver, bronze and aluminium, in the ancient way with a hammer on an upturned log, inspired students and clients of all ages and from all walks of life. Ruth, his mother, had been a student of Maria Montessori. While she taught the children of the Sinn Fein in Ireland, his father, Stormont, corresponded with Sigmund Freud. On returning to England they joined the Tolstoyan Anarchist community at Whiteway, near Stroud, where Michael was born in 1923. Here families and radicals built their own homes and a bakery, grew their own food, collected water from the "wet ground" and talked late into the night. Eighty years later Michael still needed chatter around him to fall asleep.

The young family then moved to High Wycombe, where his father's "Distributism" was developed, a social vision where everyone would work their own plot of land. Their home was frequented by Bernard Shaw, Eric Gill, Michael Tippett, Arthur Bliss and G.K. Chesterton, who impressed the young Michael by turning around two hecklers, who then set off that night to start a community at Laxton. Both Whiteway and Laxton communities continue to this day.

In 1938 Michael began a stained-glass apprenticeship with Eddy Nuttgens at Piggotts, near High Wycombe. He moved on to bind 10 books in a fortnight with Douglas Cockerell in Letchworth Garden City, and then to Ditchling, to learn silversmithing from Dunstan Pruden. At just 16, he was teaching soldiers as part of their re-training at Brighton College of Art; butterfly watching on the Downs with the calligrapher Edward Johnston; and cycling 100 miles home to see his family.

Coming from a family of pacifists, Michael Murray was a vegetarian from birth and a conscientious objector. The Second World War was for him a self-directed period of education - working single-handedly a 170-acre farm at Bradenham; market gardening; fruit farming, forestry at Apthorpe in Northamptonshire, and helping returning soldiers set up a co-op at Bitterswell, Leicestershire, with his young wife Rosemary.

At the end of the war he moved to London to train again in silversmithing at the Central School of Art and Crafts, then under W.R. Lethaby. Then began a career of crafting silver for churches, converting and managing workshops in London, and becoming an adviser to local councils and the Government in the 1980s on "live/work" accommodation.

His early workshops in Rosebery Avenue and Old Street were highly productive. With his then apprentice William Phipps, now a master spoon-maker, Sally Jones, George Grant, Dickie Costain and his own elder daughter, Clare Murray, now also a silversmith, his commissions included a huge Christ the King for Holy Rood, Oxford, with its church furniture (a real altar in the round in a modern setting); a sanctuary lamp for the Gethsemane Chapel in Coventry Cathedral; and, with his brother Martin's woodwork, a tall Processional Cross for Guildford Cathedral. With Keith Murray he furnished the New Chapel for the Royal Foundation of St Katherine in east London, and six copes (huge processional robes) for the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth. In 1955 he made and fitted high up on Westminster Abbey a huge bronze phoenix, 12 foot in wingspan, which can be seen from the roads all around.

All his life he continued the making of chalices, christening mugs and odd commissions - such as a stirrup-cup shaped as a horse's head to fit into the pocket. His clients ranged from the Queen Mother to anyone who wished to buy something: always tailoring what he made to what they could afford. In 1998, Sally Jones hosted an exhibition of his and his many students' work in her gallery in the City, "Goldensilver: 60 years a smiting".

Murray was also an active organiser promoting the survival of the crafts. He joined the Art Workers Guild as their youngest member; for one of the "live" evenings he arranged, his eldest son, Sebastian, demonstrated sand-casting. In the 1950s he started the New Churches Research Group, proposing radical changes in church design which resulted in St Paul's Church, Bow Common (designed by Robert Maguire in 1956 and now a listed building). This got him excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church which he had joined as a teenager, but as the years passed he watched all these ideas of "a church in the round" being assimilated and accepted.

In 1971 he helped form the Crafts Advisory Committee and Crafts Council, and was instrumental in starting the Clerkenwell Green Association, being seen as a rebel in tackling the council to find property for workspace. In his sixties he converted the Metropolitan Hospital in Shoreditch into workspaces. After his wife died in 1990, he developed his charity, the Michael Murray Arts Crafts Trades Skills Trust (Acts), and took his skills to Cromarty as artist-in-residence, where the town knew him as the "wild man" with his door always open for passers-by to watch or pick up a hammer.

Michael Murray would often tell of two childhood incidents that shaped him. The first was seeing the Jarrow marchers in the 1930s - he decided he would never be in a position where he could be made unemployed. The second was a meeting with Mahatma Gandhi at Kingsley Hall, in east London: Gandhi, being more interested in the 11-year-old amongst the adult devotees, taught him how to spin. He declared that the title to his autobiography would be Our Life is in Our Hands. The philosophy of his working life was "learning by doing".

In the last few years he married again, and we took his tools around in a "Travelling Open Workshop", setting up logs and old saucepan lids to beat into bowls, animals and dolphins. Michael's long-held theory was that the early metal pots would have been re-beaten and thus "disappeared", so pottery "survivors", which could not be re-used in the same way, merely appeared to predate metal; in other words, long before clay was used, metal nuggets in riverbeds were being beaten into humanity's first bowls. He would point out in the British Museum how pottery copied metal's natural shapes.

One year he delightedly watched his theory being given expression as the children of Chelsfield, Kent, practising this ancient skill at the church fete, found themselves short of hammers, and spontaneously selected large white pebbles from the Vicar's flowerbed.

Michael Bryan Murray, silversmith and craftsman: born Stroud, Gloucestershire 29 July 1923; married 1945 Rosemary Veber (died 1990; three sons, two daughters), 2004 Anne Nicholson; died London 31 January 2005.


Source: The Independent - 8th February 2005

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 30, 2013 4:08 pm

MASSEY & WINDHAM (Massy & Wyndham)

4, Birchin Lane & 78, Cornhill, London


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Massey & Windham - London - 1834

The business of Thomas Massey and James Windham.

Noted at 4, Birchin Lane 1830-1839, and 78, Cornhill 1834-1838.

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore existing between us, as Watch and Chronometer Makers and Dealers in Massey's Patent Logs and Sounding Machines, and carried on at No. 4, Birchin-lane, London is dissolved, by mutual consent, from the 10th day of September instant: As witness our hands the 9th day of September 1839.
Thos. Massey.
James Windham.


Source: The London Gazette - September 1839

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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 04, 2013 8:22 am

J.J. STOCKALL & SONS

Lever Street, later, King's Square, later, Wilderness Row, later, 6,8 & 10, Clerkenwell Road and 17, Charterhouse Buildings


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J.J. Stockall & Sons - London - 1898

Established in 1840 by James John Stockall. Converted into a limited liability company, styled J.J. Stockall & Sons Ltd., on the 24th July 1900, the directors being noted as Thomas James Stockall, W.H. Stockall, W.B. Griffiths, and John James Stockall jnr.. In 1908 they merged with Robert Moffat Marples & Son and the company restyled to Stockall, Marples & Co.Ltd., the directors be noted as J,J. Stockall, R.M. Marples, J.T. Stockall, and N.M. Marples. In c.1911 the business went into liquidation and was reformed as Stockall, Marples & Co.(1912)Ltd., the directors being noted as J.J. Stockall, E. Smart, and H.L. Taverner.

James John Stockall entered his mark 'JJS' contained within an oblong punch, with the London Assay Office, on the 17th November 1881, 20th October 1882, and on the 27th November 1886.

Trev.

dognose
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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 06, 2013 10:52 am

PETER C. COOK

Example of the work of Peter C. Cook. A pair of hammered finish condiment ladles, assayed at London in 1977:


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PCC - London - 1977

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dognose
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Posts: 40554
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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 11, 2013 12:19 pm

CYRIL JAMES FROST

Banbury

Example of the work of Cyril James Frost. A combination match box and cigarette holder with a hammered finish on the rings, assayed at London in 1945:


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Cyril James Frost (b.1880 - d.1971) was an an artist and teacher from Banbury, he acquired his silversmithing skills having learnt the trade from George Hart of the Guild of Handicraft around the period c.1930.

Trev.

dognose
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Re: Some London Advertisements and Information

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 04, 2014 9:11 am

H.T. KNIGHT Ltd.

271 & 332, 332b, 332c, 334. 336, Goswell Road, London


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H.T. Knight Ltd. - London - 1920


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H.T. Knight Ltd. - London - 1921

Exhibitors at the British Industries Fair 1921.

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