The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

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Postby dognose » Sat Mar 16, 2013 7:23 am

DAVID L. GORDON

392, later, 73, Queen Street West, Toronto


Damage to the extent of $30 was caused by fire yesterday morning to premises occupied by a jeweller named David Gordon, No. 392 Queen street west.

Source: The Toronto Daily Mail - 13th February 1889


David L. Gordon, Watchmaker and Jeweller. No. 73 Queen Street West. - A prosperous and reliable house, devoted to the jewellery trade in Toronto, rapidly winning a most enviable reputation for AI productions and straightforward business methods is that of Mr. David L. Gordon, whose establishment is located at No. 73 Queen Street. This enterprising gentleman was born in Germany and has been a resident of Toronto for a number of years. Having a thorough knowledge of this trade in all its branches, acquired by many years practical experience he inaugurated this establishment in 1880 and has won a patronage such as is not accorded to some older houses in the same line. His store is of ample dimensions, attractively fitted up and the stock earned is full and complete. It embraces a fine assortment of gold and silver watches, elegant diamonds, pearls, rubies, emeralds and other precious gems, mounted in exquisite and original styles wedding, engagement and souvenir rings, jewellery of all kinds, French, Swiss and American clocks, solid gold, silver and plated wares, spectacles, eye glasses, lenses, opera glasses, and other optical goods; ' besides a full assortment of art novelties in gold, silver, bronze, zyprus, etc, these goods have been selected to meet the wants of a first-class trade, and are unsurpassed in , quality, beauty and workmanship. Attached to the store is a fully equipped workshop, in which skilled workmen are given employment, and any special design in this line of business is executed in the finest style of workmanship. A specially is the repairing of fine watches, clocks and jewellery, and all work is warranted to give satisfaction.

Source: Illustrated Toronto - The Queen City of Canada - Its Past Present and Future - 1890

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Postby dognose » Sun Mar 17, 2013 8:20 am

JOHN BOOTH

St. John, New Brunswick

An example of the work of John Booth:

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Tablespoon in the Old English pattern, 8 1/2" (21.5cm) in length.

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John Booth was born in Scotland in 1770. In 1783 he was in New York, but, as a Loyalist, he left the city with the Royal Engineers to relocate at St. John. He was granted his freedom at St. John on the 15th December 1785.

His working period at St. John is likely to be from 1785 until 1813. He was a noted maker of silver spoons, gold ear-rings and wedding rings, and a repairer of clocks and watches. In 1799 he was noted as sharing a workshop with Alexander Munro.

He died at St. John in November 1813, aged 43 years. He left five children.

His working tools, silver, and stock were purchased by James Burns, for the sums of £80 and £218.

See: http://www.925-1000.com/canadiansilver_01.html

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Postby dognose » Sun Mar 17, 2013 8:44 am

SAMUEL B. WINDRUM

31 King Street East, Toronto


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S.B. Windrum - Toronto - 1885

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S.B. Windrum - Toronto - 1891


Samuel B. Wlndrum, Dealer in Watches, Jewellery, etc., 31 King Street East. - Mr. Samuel B. Windrum, the subject of the present sketch, was born in the County Monaghan, Ireland, about 40 years ago. At an early age he left his native soil for America, and came to Ottawa, where he taught school in the County of Carleton for about two years. On leaving there he came to Toronto and shortly afterwards entered the employ of Messrs. J. G. Joseph & Co., known as the London and Paris House, which was then and for many years afterwards the leading jewellery esiablishment of the city. Here he remained for 15 years until 1880, when he I started business on his own account in his present location, where he has a neatly arranged office and commodious and well appointed factory. Mr. Windrum imports and deals in watches, clocks, diamonds and precious stones, also cricketing and games, and manufactures all kinds of gold and silver jewellery, electro silver plate, and Masonic and society emblems. Mr. Windrum's long experience in the jewellery trade has made him conversant with its every detail, and he is looked upon as an expert in his line. With commendable enterprise he is ever on the alert to improve his business as occasion presents itself, and to keep abreast of the times; and the success that he has already met with is an augury of future prosperity.

Source: Industries of Canada : Historical and Commercial Sketches of Toronto and Environs - 1886


Death of Samuel B. Windrum

Toronto, Can.. March 5.—Samuel B. Windrum. who for many years carried on a jewelry business on King St.. died on the 26th ult. He had been ill with fever for over a year and was attacked with paralysis early in February, since which time he had been confined to his bed. Mr. Windrum came to Canada from Ireland at an early age and was engaged in the jewelry trade until the Spring of last year, when ill health compelled him to retire. He was for many years a prominent Mason, and was a past president of the Irish Protestant Benevolent Society. He was in the 55th year of his age, and leaves a widow and four children.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 2nd March 1898

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Postby dognose » Mon Mar 18, 2013 9:56 am

J. CLENDINNEN

37, McGill Street, Montreal

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J. Clendinnen - Montreal - 1853

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Postby dognose » Mon Mar 18, 2013 2:09 pm

JULIUS CORNELIUS

99, Granville Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia

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J. Cornelius - Halifax NS - 1875

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J. Cornelius - Halifax NS - 1882

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J. Cornelius - Halifax NS - 1884

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J. Cornelius - Halifax, N.S. - 1892

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J. Cornelius - Halifax NS - 1893


Julius Cornelius has moved back to his reconstructed store, 99 Granville St., Halifax, N. S.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 13th May 1891


Julius Cornelius, manufacturing jeweler, Halifax, N. S., is showing some unique souvenir spoons of the city. The bowl of the spoon has a well-executed design of H. M. S. Blake, the magnificent British man-of-war now stationed at the garrison city of Nova Scotia, and the word “ Halifax ” engraved on the handle.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 7th September 1892


Julius Cornelius was born in Prussia in 1825. He came to America and was recorded as working for Tiffany in 1853 and 1854. Julius was particularly noted for his fine work in the manufacture of jewellery using Nova Scotia gold. He retired in 1905 and passed the business to son, Herman Cornelius, and the firm restyled as Cornelius & Co.. Julius Cornelius died in 1916.

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Postby dognose » Tue Mar 19, 2013 7:31 am

EDMUND SCHEUER

11, Wellington Street West, Toronto

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Edmund Scheuer - Toronto - 1890

Edmund Scheuer, Wholesale Jeweller, 11 Wellington Street West. –An interesting and ever active business is that of the wholesale and manufacturing jeweller. Toronto can boast of some establishments in her midst which can compare favorably with those of any city either in the States or the Dominion. The latest addition to the ranks of those engaged in this industry is Mr. Edmund Scheuer, so long and favorably known in the neighboring city of Hamilton as a partner in the firm of Levy Brothers & Scheuer, with which house he was associated for fifteen years. Mr. Scheuer was born in Germany, and afterwards located at Paris, France, where he was for many years manager of a leading commission house. Migrating from France, he settled in Hamilton as a partner of the Messrs. Levy. The energy and business experience of the new partner soon opened up a large and extended commercial connection, which placed the firm in the very foremost rank of wholesale jewellers. A few months since Mr. Scheuer severed all connection with.the Hamilton firm, and established himself at the spacious premises he now occupies at 11, Wellington Street West, where in his large warerooms he carries a full stock of English, German, French and American goods of the latest design and improvement. Fashion rules the jewellery market in a most fickle manner, but Mr. Scheuer is ever alive to the situation, and meets the demand with a ready supply of the latest fashionable goods to suit all classes. Though but a few months in the city, Mr. Scheuer has met with a success beyond his most sanguine expectations. A prominent member of the Hamilton Board of Trade, it is to be assumed that his name will soon appear on the list of the Toronto Board.

Source: Industries of Canada : Historical and Commercial Sketches of Toronto and Environs - 1886

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Postby dognose » Wed Mar 20, 2013 8:23 am

PAGE BROTHERS

41, King Street, St. John, New Brunswick

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Page Brothers - St. John, NB - 1872

Richard and William Clement Page were the sons of Amos Page, see: http://www.925-1000.com/canadiansilver_02.html and http://www.925-1000.com/ax_pageBros_Can.html They were in business from 1870 until 1876.

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Postby dognose » Thu Mar 21, 2013 1:04 pm

JAMES J. LANGFORD

Halifax, Nova Scotia


LANGFORD, JAMES J. (or James I.), jeweller and silversmith; b. in or about 1815; the son, probably adopted, of John and Grace Langford; m. 12 Oct. 1843 Jane Grant in Halifax, and they had no surviving children; d. there 6 Feb. 1847.
The evidence of James J. Langford’s family background is contradictory. Grace Langford’s second husband, the silversmith Peter Nordbeck*, claimed in a petition to the Halifax County Court of Probate that Grace was the mother of James Langford, but she could not have been the natural mother. Aged 31 at his death, James must have been born in 1815 or early 1816. There is, however, no record of the birth of James Langford at that time; moreover, another son of John and Grace Langford, William Payne, was born on 1 Sept. 1815. It seems likely, then, that James was adopted.
John Langford, a goldsmith and jeweller, had come to Halifax from London shortly before September 1809. Through him James may have been heir to a rich family tradition of metal work in England. Two Langfords had been pewterers there in the late 1670s, as was Thomas Langford of London in 1751 and afterwards. During the period 1719—57 John Langford, also of London, was active in the same craft, and a second John Langford was working in pewter in 1780; both used symbols that included a forearm holding a hammer over a small horizontal barrel. In addition to these five pewterers, John Langford and Thomas Langford were active as silversmiths in England in the decade 1766—76. The relationship, if any, of these craftsmen to each other and to James Langford and his father is unclear. That James’s symbol was a bent arm holding a hammer raised in a position to strike may suggest a connection.
James Langford became closely associated with other silversmiths in Halifax. His father had been a partner of Lewis (Ludovic) Hulsman from 1809 to at least 1811, and James grew up on Granville Street, where the silversmiths Richard Upham Marsters, Gustave La Baume, Peter Nordbeck, and Henry Mignowitz were working. Nordbeck, who became his stepfather in 1833, was later the most successful Nova Scotian silversmith of his time. James Langford may have apprenticed with either Nordbeck or Mignowitz, who had been partners at least twice between 1824 and 1831. When, on 14 July 1838, he announced that he had commenced business, he described himself as a “Working Gold & Silversmith, Jeweller, &c” and gave his address as “adjoining Mr. Mignowitz’s stone building.”
Langford acquired considerable public patronage as a silversmith. Within two years he was advertising hollow-ware, and several of his chalices have survived, including one that he made with Nordbeck. Chalices by local silversmiths are relatively scarce, perhaps because in largely Protestant Nova Scotia religious commissions were less important than they were in, for example, Lower Canada. A commemorative tankard of Langford’s was presented in July 1841 to the secretary of the Halifax Agricultural Society. As early as April 1840 Langford had taken Franz F. Meyer as his assistant and on 1 Nov. 1841 they became partners. In addition to making gold- and silver-ware they imported “jewelry, Plated Ware and fancy Goods in General.” The partnership, like many others between Halifax silversmiths, did not last long, and after 15 months it was dissolved. From then until his death in 1847 Langford seems to have devoted his energy to his work in silver. His newspaper advertisements stressed the variety of his flatware and serving pieces and noted that he made them in all patterns.
Langford died without a will. Nordbeck and Jane Langford then petitioned the Court of Probate to appoint as administrators of his estate Jane’s father, Daniel Grant, and Nordbeck himself, both of whom were creditors of Langford. The appointment was co-guaranteed by Alexander Troup and Charles D. Witham, both silversmiths and jewellers. Langford’s most valuable asset was his business, and it was quickly sold to William James Veith and George Witham. They used his symbol of the raised bent arm holding a hammer and in describing their services they mentioned the same products and the same patterns that Langford had offered. After the dissolution of their partnership two years later, Veith carried on alone until 1860.
Langford’s career was short; nevertheless, a relatively large quantity of his silver still exists. His best pieces, such as the sugar tongs in the Public Archives of Nova Scotia, are effortless and confident. A set of six knives in the Henry Birks Collection at the National Gallery of Canada is remarkable both for the delicacy of the leafy pattern engraved at the base of the blades and for their rarity, since knives are virtually unknown in Canadian silver. Langford’s ideas and designs were innovative and experimental, and as a result his surviving work is surprisingly diverse. His early death left the Halifax silversmithing community without one of its most energetic, capable, and promising members.

Brian D. Murphy

The main surviving examples of James Langford’s work as a silversmith are in the Henry Birks Coll. of Silver at the National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa) and, to a lesser extent, at the N.S. Museum (Halifax). In addition, the following institutions each possess one of his spoons: the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the McCord Museum, and the Royal Ont. Museum, Sigmund Samuel Canadiana Building (Toronto).
Halifax County Court of Probate (Halifax), Estate papers, no.205 (James J. Langford) (mfm. at PANS). PANS, RG 35A, 1—3. St Paul’s Anglican Church (Halifax), Reg. of baptisms. Acadian Recorder, 14 Sept. 1833; 14 July 1838; 8 Feb. 1840; 6 Nov. 1841; 5 July 1845; 6 Feb., 27 March, 17, 24 April, 1, 8 May 1847. Halifax Morning Post & Parliamentary Reporter, 4 Nov. 1841; 25, 27, 29 Jan., 1, 3 Feb. 1842. Novascotian, 12 Sept. 1833; 9, 16 April, 9 July 1840; 1 Sept. 1842; 30 Jan., 20, 27 Feb. 1843; 8 Feb. 1847. Times (Halifax), 27 July 1841, 17 Oct. 1843. H. H. Cotterell, Old pewter, its makers and marks in England, Scotland, and Ireland . . . (London, 1929; repub. 1963). C. J. Jackson, English goldsmiths and their marks . . . (2nd ed., London, 1921; repr. New York, 1964). J. E. Langdon, Canadian silversmiths, 1700—1900 (Toronto, 1966). D. C. Mackay, Silversmiths and related craftsmen of the Atlantic provinces (Halifax, 1973). Harry Piers and D. C. Mackay, Master goldsmiths and silversmiths of Nova Scotia and their marks, ed. U. B. Thomson and A. M. Strachan (Halifax, 1948). D. [C.] Mackay, “Goldsmiths and silversmiths,” Canadian Antiques Collector (Toronto), 7 (1972), no.1: 22—26.


Text reproduced from the Dictionary of Canadian Biography http://www.biographi.ca/009004-119.01-e ... hzfqkvzape

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Postby dognose » Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:57 am

A.W. RUSSELL

20, Toronto Street, later, 57, Yonge Street, Toronto

A. W. RUSSELL, WHOLESALE IMPORTER OF WATCHES AND JEWELLERY. Mr. A. W. Russell, wholesale importer of watches and jewellery, 57 Yonge Street, over the Express Office, came to Canada from New York, in the autumn of 1862. As the war had produced a perfect stagnation in the English watch trade there, he opened at 20 Toronto Street - business increasing and the office being rather confined, he removed last fall to his presentt very commodious office. The rooms are comfortably furnished and suitably fitted up to display to advantage the samples of the different varieties of goods, affording to his customers a comfort, not generally regarded by the trade. Mr. Russell had a great deal to contend against in establishing this present business. The retail trade had been dealing with the same houses for upwards of twenty years, which were principally located in Montreal. His customers had to be seduced from these importers, and to do this, it was necessary to supply goods at moderate rates, and of a thoroughly reliable character. The Montreal houses had, to a certain extent, abused the confidence of the retail trade by selling inferior and unreliable goods. When the genuine article purchased in the legitimate course of trade, was offered, and a corresponding price demanded, it required at first all the powers of persuasion and business tact, to effect sales. It has taken four years to convince the trade that Mr. Russell could import for them as advantageously as the Montreal houses, and to establish, as it were, Toronto as the centre for Western buyers. His efforts, however, have at length been highly successful, for there is now hardly a watchmaker of any pretensions whatever, in Western Canada, who does not deal with him, and a great many almost exclusively. The celebrated watches manufactured by Thos. Russell & Son. chronometer makers to the Queen, (of which firm Mr. Russell is a partner), he makes a speciality of. The watches have gained a wide spread celebrity in the Province, for being superior and reliable time keepers. His stock of watches and jewellery is very extensive and well assorted, embracing all the different varieties of English and Swiss watches, fine gold, plated and the other kinds of jewellery; offering to the Western trade one of the best assortments both in respect to value and variety. As Toronto is the most central market, and the most accessible from all points in Upper Canada, it offers great advantages to the Western buyer. This fact is fully sustained from the fact that not one of the retail trade West of Kingston now go to Montreal, to purchase stock, either in the spring or fall, all now make Toronto their centre or market. To Mr. Russell this is in a great measure due. The superior manufacture of his goods, and consequent entire satisfaction which they afford, especially the Russell watch, together with a judicious outlay in making the public aware of the advantages possessed by him, has done much to bring about this very desirable state of affairs. An assortment of their superior and well known watches constantly kept in stock by the following thoroughly reliable houses-–

In Toronto, by J. Robinson & Co., J. E. Ellis, W. Wharin & Co., J. Wanless and E. M. Morphy.
In London, by J. H. Jackson, P. Wyckoff, and L. S. Ware.
In St. Catherines, by J. B. Fowler, Douglas & McMullen, and J. W. Jackson.
In Kingston, by J. Johnston, M. & R. Gage, and C. Spangenberg.
In Hamilton, by B. Batty, and S. Lees.
In Brantford, by J. Griffith, and J. Creyk
In Simcoe, by G. F. Counter, and G. L. Darling.
In Woodstock, by R. Woodroofe, and R. A. Dingwall.
In Guelph by R. Cuthbert.
In Windsor, by J. Frazer.
In Chatham, by J. Marquand.
In Stratford, by L. A Dyke.
In Port Hope, by H. Perry.
In Brockville, by S. B. Steacey.
In Bramoton. by H. Page.
In Gait, by J. Kay.
In Sarnia, by J. C. Balster.
In Berlin, by W. Knell
In Belleville, by J. Taylor.
In Bowmanville, by W,. Cornish & Son.
In Oshawa, by F. Taylor and Phil. Taylor.
In Ingersol, by T. P. Fawkes, and C.P. Wall.
In St. Mary's, by W. Mercer.
In Elora, by S. B. Stevenson.
In Newcastle, by M. Henry.
In Brooklyn, by W. Hepinstall.
In Durham, by P. H. Edwards.

Source: Toronto as a Market for Western Canada Merchants with Descriptive Notes of the Principal Business Establishments in the City - 1866



RUSSELLS'

9 King Street West, Toronto

RUSSELLS', Watches, Jewellery, Etc., 9 King Street West ; Robert Cuthbert, Proprietor.– One of the representative watch and jewellery stores in Toronto is that known as Russells', 9 King Street West, of which Mr. Robert Cuthbert is the popular proprietor. This was a branch of the famous English house of Thomas Russell & Son, which was established in Liverpool, England, in 1797. The Toronto house was opened in 1860 under the management of Mr Cuthbert, who, in 1881, purchased the business which he conducts under the name of "Russells'," by terms of his purchase. Mr. Cuthbert occupies two well-equipped floors, each 30 x 50 feet in area, where he keeps in stock a splendid assortment of English chronometers, Russell's Brand, stop, Swiss and American watches of the most famous makers, clocks silver and plated ware, diamond goods, jewellery of artistic designs, and all articles usually found in a first-class establishment. All goods purchased at this house are warranted to be exactly as represented, or money will be refunded. A specialty is made of repairing fine and complicated watches, all work being guaranteed. All jewellery goods dealt in are selected with great care, the first consideration being excellence of workmanship and beauty of design. Popular prices prevail and patrons are always sure of getting genuine articles. Mr. Cuthbert was born in England, but has resided in Toronto the greater part of his life, where he is highly esteemed by the community for his ability and integrity. He employs four clerks, and his trade extends throughout the entire Dominion.

Source: Illustrated Toronto - The Queen City of Canada - Its Past Present and Future - 1890



Robert Cuthbert, for many years the manager of Thomas Russell & Son's watch and jewelry concern in Toronto, and who subsequently succeeded to their business, continuing the same under the name of Russell's, 9 King St. W., Toronto, has determined to close out and retire from the business. He intends first to place himself on equal terms with the world by paying everybody he owes. He advertises that he has enough assets to do this. All or part of the stock will be offered at public auction.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 5th August 1891

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Postby dognose » Fri Mar 22, 2013 6:07 am

JORGENSON & SAMUELSON

190 Queen Street West, Toronto

Jorgenson & Samuelson, Watchmakers and Jewellers, No. 190 Queen Street West. –Conspicuous among the comparatively new business enterprises that have won popular favor, the jewellery store of Messrs. Jorgenson & Samuelson is deserving of special mention. This firm was formed about two years ago. Its store is favorably located at 190 Queen Street West. It is filled with a carefully selected assortment of fine domestic and imported watches, clocks and jewellery of every description, elegant gold and silver plated ware, optical goods and a great variety of other articles usually found in a first-class establishment of this character. These gentlemen are practical and expert watchmakers and jewellers of ample experience, that of the junior member of the firm covering a period of 15 years. The repairing and adjusting of fine watches receives particular attention, and is done promptly and satisfactorily. Mr. Theodore Jorgenson is a young man under 30, a native of Denmark, whence he came to this city some three years ago, and enjoys the reputation of being one of the most skilful practical watchmakers of Toronto, having devoted his zeal and energy to this branch exclusively. Mr. John Samuelson is one of the same nationality, but has been a resident of Toronto for more than 15 years; he is about 35 years of age, and has rendered very acceptable service as a member of the school board. They are both known and respected as highly honorable business men and valuable citizens, and merit the success they have achieved.

Source: Industries of Canada : Historical and Commercial Sketches of Toronto and Environs - 1886

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Postby dognose » Fri Mar 22, 2013 1:59 pm

JAMES TRACY

19, Rideau Street, Ottawa

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James Tracy - Ottawa - 1866

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Postby dognose » Sun Mar 24, 2013 5:00 am

B.G. JEFFERIS & Co.

Orillia and Beaverton

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B.G. Jefferis & Co. - Orillia and Beaverton - 1872

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Postby dognose » Mon Mar 25, 2013 12:11 pm

MICHAEL SEPTIMUS BROWN

108, later, 128, Granville Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia

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M.S. Brown - Halifax, Nova Scotia - 1871

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M.S. Brown & Co. - Halifax, Nova Scotia - 1879

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M.S. Brown & Co. - Halifax, Nova Scotia - 1882


M. S. Brown & Co., Halifax, N. S., are making a splendid display at the Provincial exhibition in that city this week. They have secured on the main aisle, main building, a space 24x12 feet, which will be filled with diamonds and gold jewelry, etc., to the value of about $30,000. A fireproof safe will be put in to contain the exhibit at night. There will also be a number of minor exhibits of jewelry at the fair from other firms.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 23rd September 1891


M. S. Brown & Co., Halifax, N. S., made a magnificent display at the Provincial Exhibition held in that city last week. In the centre part of their space was set a dinner table with a handsome silver service, and surrounding this were a number of showcases in which watches, rings, bracelets and other jewelry were displayed. Above the showcases marble and bronze clocks were shown. The Starr Mfg. Co. made an exhibit of silver-plated ware which was much admired.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 7th October 1891



BROWN, MICHAEL SEPTIMUS, silversmith and jeweller; b. 22 Dec. 1818 in Halifax, N.S., son of William Brown and Joanna Bessonett, née Stairs; d. unmarried on 29 Nov. 1886 in Halifax.
Michael Septimus Brown was a cousin of the noted chronometer-maker, Richard Upham Marsters, and two of his elder brothers learned the watch, clock, and hardware trade from their half-brother, John Stayner Bessonett. Brown himself, however, was apprenticed in 1833 to the talented silversmith and goldsmith, Peter Nordbeck. In 1840 Brown established an independent jewellery and silver business in Halifax; in addition to wares made with the skills learned from Nordbeck, he relied heavily upon imported British speciality items, such as watches, toys, and eyeglasses. Brown became increasingly ambitious as his skills attracted new clients, but the real success of his firm appears to date from the mid 1850s when he commenced regular buying trips to England to improve the quality of his imported stock.
Brown was able to attract many of Nordbeck’s customers following the latter’s death in 1861, and in new quarters the firm became the most prominent enterprise of its type in Halifax. Inferior stock was discontinued and the emphasis was placed on quality, reliability, and honesty. Brown was respected for his integrity and at one time his watches carried this guarantee: “Wind me up and use me well, and let me have fairplay / And I to you will try to give the precious time of day / But if by chance that I should stop, or fail to give the hour, / Take me back to M. S. Brown, and he will give me power.” Brown himself was noted for his superb silver flatware and jewellery, but the firm’s workshops produced several other talented artisans, including David Hudson Whiston and Brown’s nephew Thomas, who was apprenticed to the business in 1851 at age 14.
Brown and his nephew formed a partnership in 1871 and the following year, in failing health, Brown retired in favour of Thomas. The firm then became M. S. Brown and Company. The public saw little more of the generous, lively, and intelligent founder of the business, since Michael Brown spent his last years as an invalid. When he died of apoplexy without a will, his estate of some $60,000, accumulated through property and investment in Halifax banks, was divided among his family. His firm, continued by a succession of owners until it was purchased by Henry Birks and Sons in 1919, maintained its founder’s record for quality and integrity.

Lois K. Kernaghan

Halifax County Court of Probate (Halifax), no.3541, estate of M. S. Brown. PANS, MG 1, 160A. Acadian Recorder, 3 July 1882, 29 Nov. 1886. D. C. Mackay, Silversmiths and related craftsmen of the Atlantic provinces (Halifax, 1973). Harry Piers and D. C. Mackay, Master goldsmiths and silversmiths of Nova Scotia and their marks, ed. U. B. Thoms, on and A. M. Strachan (Halifax, 1948).


Text reproduced from the Dictionary of Canadian Biography http://www.biographi.ca/009004-119.01-e ... terms=date

© 2000 University of Toronto/Université Laval

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The perpetual trophy presented to the Lome Aquatic Club, by M. S. Brown & Co., manufacturing jewelers, Halifax, N.S.. for the amateur four-oared championship of the Maritime provinces, is on exhibition in the firm's window. It is a shield of mahogany, 26 inches wide by 20 inches high, ornamented with silver. Across the top is a miniature rope, and beneath arc the coats-of-arms of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, each engraved on a separate silver plate In the center is a large silver plate on which are engraved two crews at work on the water, and on either side of this large plate are heavy carved scrolls. Back of plate are crossed oars and beneath it a plate on which the name of the winning crew each year is to be engraved.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 29th March 1899


Thos. Brown, representing the M. S. Brown Co. in Halifax, has been at the Montreal office the past week stock taking and preparing for the season's business.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 2nd March 1898


Mr. Vidito, of M. S. Brown & Co., manufacturing and retail jewelers, Halifax, N. S., has gone on a business trip to Boston, Providence, New York and Philadelphia. His purpose is to secure novelties for the Christmas trade.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 16th November 1898


See: Canadian Silver Marks

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 26, 2013 3:13 pm

S.A. KEETCH

Yonge Street, Aurora, CW

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S.A. Keetch - Aurora, CW - 1866

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 27, 2013 6:05 am

ROBERT WILKES

48 & 50, Yonge Street, Toronto, and 441, St. Paul Street, Montreal

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Robert Wilkes - Toronto and Montreal - 1865

Mr. Wilkes is extensively engaged as a wholesale jeweller, and dealer in watches, clocks, fancy goods, &c. The business was first established in Toronto by Messrs. M. Rossin & Brother, long and favorably known to the trade of Western Canada. Mr. Wilkes succeeded to their business in 1858, and has up till very recently carried it on in their old stand. The business however, has extended so greatly within the past few years, that in January last more commodious premises were found to be necessary, and Mr. Wilkes accordingly negotiated for a lease of the adjoining building, a large block on the corner of Yonge and Wellington Streets, lately occupied by the City Bank. By throwing the two buildings into one, he is now possessed of a very commodious and handsome warehouse, in keeping with the extensive business which he carries on. The interior throughout is most beautifully fitted up; the stock of jewellery being unsurpassed in the Province consisting of watches in great variety, jewellery of every description, clocks, druggists' sundries, cutlery, and fancy foreign goods. The stock of the latter class of goods is always varied and complete, and great attention is given to the importation of goods suitable to Western Canada trade. Mr. Wilkes acts as Canadian agent for the " American Watch," a large stock of which is to be found in his warehouse. As a time keeper this watch has an excellent reputation, and although comparatively high priced, has has an enormous sale. American clocks also form a large part of Mr. Wilkes' stock. The walls of the warehouse are literally covered with them in all shapes and varieties, these clocks have now become an institution, found in all parts of the habitable globe, and are sold wonderously cheap. Mr. Wilkes also deals in electro-plated ware. So varied is the stock in this large warehouse, that a visit, and that only, can enable one to appreciate its extent, and the skill and taste evinced in the production of the different articles that meet the eye.

Source: Toronto as a Market for Western Canada Merchants with Descriptive Notes of the Principal Business Establishments in the City - 1866


Robert Wilkes was born at Tullaghan, near Bundoran, Co. Leitrim, Ireland on the 24th June 1832. He came to Toronto with his mother in 1848, he was one of seven children, his father having died in Ireland. In 1852 he secured a position as clerk with the jewellers, Rossin Brothers, and stayed with them until their retirement in 1858 and then set up business on his own account. In c.1862 he acquired the premises at 48 & 50, Yonge Street, and encouraged by his success opened a branch in Montreal in 1864. Robert Wilkes married Martha, daughter of the Rev. William Cooke D.D. of London, England, on the 23rd July 1863. He served as M.P. for Central Toronto from 1872 until 1875, he became director, later Vice President, of the Bank of Commerce in 1871. He was a member of the Board of Trade, a Trustee of the Bloor Street Methodist Church, and Treasurer of the Irish Protestant Benevolent Society. He retired c.1878, and met his death by drowning whilst attempting to rescue his son and daughter at Sturgeon Point, Ontario, his attempt was unfortunately in vain, and all three lost their lives on the 16th August 1880.

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 28, 2013 11:29 am

J.W. JOHNSON

254½, Yonge Street, Toronto


J.W. JOHNSON, Watches Jewellery, Etc.. 254½, Yonge Street - Ranking among the principal and most popular jewellery establishments in the city, and of those maintaining an enviable reputation for A I goods, is that of Mr. J. W. Johnson, No, 254½, Yonge Street. This enterprise was founded originally in 1880, by Mr. C. Dietrich, who, in 1886, disposed of it to the present proprietor Mr. Johnson, a native of Drummondville, at Niagara Falls, and has resided in Toronto for several years. He is a thoroughly skilled and experienced man in all branches of the business, and his reliable and honourable methods have won him a large patronage. His store is commodious, handsomely fitted up and provided with every convenience. The stock embraces a complete line of fine gold and silver watches of European and American manufacture ; diamonds and other precious gems, mounted in the most exquisite and unique styles; rings, earrings, pendants, breast-pins, bracelets, bangles, brooches, and necklaces, watch-chains, charms, chatelaines and lockets ; scarf, lace and shawl pins, shirt studs, collar and cuff buttons ; art novelties for use and ornament in gold, silver, bronze and zyprus; solid gold, silver and related wares, French, Swiss and American clocks ; eyeglasses, spectacles, lenses, opera glasses, microscopes and other optical goods ; music boxes ; in fact everything usually found in a first-class jewellery establishment, and all of which have been selected to meet the wants of a first class trade. They are guaranteed to be as represented, and are sold at lowest prices. A specialty is made of repairing and adjusting fine and complicated watches and chronometers - also of the repairing of jewellery and fine clocks, as well as of engraving. Mr. Johnson is a very pleasant, enterprising and honourable business man.

Source: Illustrated Toronto - The Queen City of Canada - Its Past Present and Future - 1890

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby silverly » Fri Mar 29, 2013 11:00 pm

From death record information provided by son William Percy Johnson, John William Johnson jeweller was born in Niagara Falls, Ontario on 13 July 1856 and died in Toronto on 25 April 1928.

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 30, 2013 11:01 am

H. PEACOCK

139, later, 96½, Notre Dame Street, Montreal

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H. Peacock - Montreal - 1852

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H. Peacock - Montreal - 1853

Recorded at 139, Notre Dame Street in 1845.

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 30, 2013 1:58 pm

NARCISSE BEAUDRY - NARCISSE BEAUDRY & SONS (& FILS)

1580, Notre Dame Street, later, 270, St. Lawrence Main, Montreal

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Narcisse Beaudry - Montreal - 1884

Narcisse Beaudry, Manufacturer, Jeweler and Optician, 1580 Notre Dame Street.–One of the largest and most important jewelry establishment in Montreal is that of Mr. Narcisse Beaudry, located at No. 1580 Notre Dame Street. He is one of the oldest established Watchmakers, Jewelers and Opticians, and has always conducted a large, successful business as a manufacturer and dealer. The store is neatly and tastefully fitted up with plate glass show cases, and elaborate counters of elegant design. Among the extensive and varied assortment of rich and beautiful articles to be seen here are fine gold and silver watches, silver ware, and fine gold jewelry of every description, in all the unique and ingenious designs, devices, and fashionable styles, also, spectacles, eye glasses, opera glasses, and a great variety of useful, ornamental and fancy goods. Mr. Beaudry manufactures jewelry of all kinds, and keeps in stock the best effects, English, French and American articles. He is also an extensive dealer in precious stones, and plain and ornamental French, American and Swiss clocks. As an Optician, Mr. Beaudry has a wide reputation, and perfectly understands how to adjust glasses to suit the sight. Connected with the establishment is a special department in which clocks, watches and jewelry are repaired, which is under the immediate supervision of Mr. Beaudry, who is a practical man to the business, performing all work with neatness and skill. Mr. Beaudry is of French descent, he has resided in Montreal nearly all his life, and, as a citizen and business man, is prominent, useful and influential.

Source: Industries of Canada - City of Montreal - Historical and Descriptive Review - 1886


Marie Rose Delima Gagnon, jeweler, Montreal, Can., will do business alone under the name of Narcisse Beaudry & Fils.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 7th September 1892


Rodolphe Beaudry, doing business under the style of N. Beaudry & Fils, Montreal, has assigned.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 8th February 1893


The assignee has advertised for sale by tender the stock of N. Beaudry & Fils, Montreal, recently assigned.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 15th February 1893


Narcisse Beaudry & Sons, one of the oldest established jewelry stores in Canada, having been in continuous existence since 1832, have removed from 1580 Notre Dame St. to 270 St. Lawrence Main, Montreal. The new premises have been handsomely fitted up.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 18th May 1898

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Re: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 31, 2013 8:51 am

J.W. MILLAR

135, King Street East, Toronto

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J.W. Millar - Toronto - 1866

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