Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 22, 2014 2:15 pm

WILLIAM CROWTHER

Simcoe, Ontario

William Crowther, Silversmith, of the village of Simcoe, London district, a native of England, committed suicide by hanging himself, as we are informed, in a wagon-maker's shop a few rods distant from his own dwelling, on Sunday the 10th inst. No cause is assigned for this extraordinary act, other than the sudden loss of his property, as he left an amiable and accomplished wife, and several small children to mourn his untimely fate.

Source: Farmer's Journal - 27th September 1826

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 23, 2014 3:02 pm

WILLIAM HENRY COOPER

Birmingham

Mr William Henry Cooper, silversmith, of Birmingham, shot himself dead with a revolver on Saturday evening in a field on the Sandwell Park Golf Course, West Bromwich. Mr Cooper, who was a member of the golf club, was walking with a friend, when the latter heard a report, and looking round saw him fall to the ground, with a bullet wound to the head. A revolver lay near. A doctor, who was playing golf, was called, but could only pronounce life extinct.

Source: The Glasgow Herald - 18th July 1914

William Henry Cooper was aged forty-nine at the time of his death. He resided at West Bromwich and was in business as a silversmith at Northampton Street, Birmingham.

He is perhaps to be identified with the business of W.H. Cooper & Co. who registered their mark with the Birmingham Assay Office in July 1909.

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 25, 2014 11:36 am

CARL HEINING

Denver

As Carl Heining, a poor jeweller of Denver, was refining $12 worth of gold dust at a stove it was lost by the breaking of the refining glass. He instantly washed a cup clean, filled it with poison, swallowed the dose, and in an hour was dead.

Source: The Toronto Daily Mail - 14th October 1882

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 27, 2014 10:56 am

WILLIAM HENRY BURKS

Auburn, Hawthorn, Melbourne


Man Found Hanged

The dead body of William Henry Burks, a jeweller, of Lingwell-street, Auburn, was found hanging in a lavatory at the rear of St. Augustine's Church, Burwood-road, Hawthorn, yesterday. The discovery was made by the caretaker.


Source: The Age - 22nd February 1926

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 05, 2014 10:12 am

HENRY LESLIE ALCOCK

Five Dock, Sydney

MAN POISONED

Henry Leslie Alcock, 40, a jeweller, of Heath and Howley streets, Fivedock, died at Balmain Hospital on Saturday from the effects of lysol poisoning. He was taken to the hospital by the Central District Ambulance. Police found an empty glass smelling of lysol beside his bed, and the bottle of the fluid in the bathroom.


Source: The Sydney Morning Herald - 8th August 1932

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 09, 2014 9:57 am

HERBERT GORHAM

New York

TWO FORMER CLUBMEN END LIFE BY POISON AT DENVER

Denver, April 18. - Herbert Gorham and William Fagen were found dead in a hovel on Clarkson street yesterday, evidently victims of suicide by cyanide of potassium.

Gorham was a member of the famous Silversmith family of Gorhams, and was at one time prominent in clubs and society in New York. A life of dissipation dragged him down and he found an affinity in Fagen, son of a wealthy Philadelphia family, when he came west. The couple became inseparable and used their regular remittances from home in partnership, a carousal following receipt of their checks until the money was gone. It is believed from fragments of letters found that their relatives had grown weary of furnishing them money and that they decided to die together.


Source: The Pittsburgh Press - 18th April 1905

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 17, 2014 6:38 am

EDWIN HOUGH

12, Mount Street, Nottingham

Suicide of a Nottingham Jeweller.–Edwin Hough, jeweller and electro-plater, of 12, Mount Street, Nottingham, committed suicide on the 9th ult., by drinking a quantity of cyanide of potassium. Melancholia, owing to depression in business, was the alleged cause of the act.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st October 1889

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 21, 2014 3:16 pm

L. VANDERBIE

Platteville, Wisconsin


MEETS SUDDEN DEATH

L. Vanderbie, Platteville, Wis., Loses His Life When a Gasoline Container Exploded in the Basement of the Forehand Building.

Milwaukee, Wis., Feb. 15.–L. Vanderbie, a leading jeweler of Platteville, Wis., lost his life in a tragic manner on Saturday, Feb. 8, when the Forehand block, in which his store is situated, was destroyed by explosion and resulting fire, killing eight persons and injuring more than 50 others. Mr. Vanderbie was 45 years old and married. He was prominent in the councils of the Wisconsin Retail Jewelers' Association and recognized as one of the most progressive members of the trade.

The best information available is to the effect that at about 1 P.M. last Saturday a gasoline explosion in the basement of the Forehand building caused a blaze which spread throughout the structure, occupying an entire square block in the heart of the city of Platteville. While the fire department was battling with the flames, assisted by scores of volunteers, several other explosions occurred, wrecking the building. The walls fell and buried a large number of persons, including Mr. Vanderbie, who was trying to save his stock. He was among the eight who were dead when taken from the ruins.

It was the worst catastrophe in the history of Platteville, a prosperous lead and zinc mining community of southwestern Wisconsin and having a population of 6,000. The financial loss is estimated at $75,000 on building and stocks of various merchants. The loss on the Vanderbie store is believed to be almost total, as little of the stock could be saved, while the furniture and fixtures were destroyed.

Resolutions on the death of Mr. Vanderbie were adopted at the annual convention of the Wisconsin association at Oshkosh, Feb. 12 and 13. He had made arrangements to attend, as usual, but his life was snuffed out four days before the meeting.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 19th February 1919

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 26, 2014 8:29 am

JOHN COCKBURN

28, George Street, Richmond, Surrey

Mr. A. Braxton Hicks, the Mid-Surrey Coroner, held an inquest at Abbot's Dene, The Green, Richmond, Surrey, touching the death of John Cockburn, aged 59 years, a jeweler, lately residing at the above address, and carrying on business at George Street, Richmond, who committed suicide on Friday morning. The evidence showed that the deceased, who was suffering from a cancerous tumour in the neck, which had been pronounced incurable, shot himself dead in bed with a revolver. The jury returned a verdict "That the deceased shot himself while in a temporary state of insanity, caused by the painful nature of his illness," and added that they sympathised with the family in their bereavement.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st September 1891

From other internet sources it would appear that John Cockburn was the son of James Robertson Cockburn, and was the grandson of of Andrew Cockburn (b.1760), an Edinburgh silversmith that migrated south. It would also appear likely that the business was continued by John Cockburn's son (?), also named John (b.1872-d.1950).

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 01, 2014 5:54 am

ROBERT C. MURRAY

Boston, Massachusetts

Watchmaker Killed by Fall, Leap from Window

New York, June 5 (AP) - Robert C. Murray, a watchmaker, of Boston fell or leaped to his death today from the seventh story of the Elks Club on West 43rd Street.

Murray had been taken there last night after becoming ill in Grand Central Station. When the club secretary entered Murray's room at 11 o'clock, he found a window open. Murray's body lay on a roof three stories below. Murray belonged to the Elks lodge in Elgin, Ill.. A sister lives in Boston.


Source: Schenectady Gazette - 6th June 1927

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 04, 2014 9:44 am

HENRY SINCLAIR

England

FARRINGDON - One of the most deplorable accidents that has ever occurred for some time, and which has produced a considerable sensation in this town and at Bristol, took place on Thursday evening last, at the Challow Marsh crossing, on the Great Western Railway, a few miles distant, whereby Mr. Henry Sinclair, a travelling silversmith and jeweller, met with a terrible death. He reached the Challow crossing about a quarter before seven o'clock, the moment when the afternoon down express train from Paddington was coming up at a rate of between sixty and seventy miles per hour. Some persons who were standing near called out to him to stop until the train had passed, but he took no notice, and attempted to cross the rails. His fate was awful; in an instant the engine had caught him and his body was hurled an enormous distance, and falling on the rails the whole train passed over him. He was literally cut to pieces. There was not a whole bone left in his body, and the fragments were scattered in all directions. On the train arriving at the Farringdon-street station the engine-driver made known the accident to Mr. Steven, the superintendent of the station, who immediately proceeded to the spot with a pilot engine, and collecting the remains, conveyed them back to the station. The deceased carried a box on his back which contained upwards of £300 worth of jewellery. The engine and tender were strewed with watches and trinkets, and a considerable quantity were found on the line and in the adjacent fields.

Source: Morning Chronicle - 18th October 1847

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 13, 2014 3:27 am

FRANCIS SCHNEIDER

Maiden Lane, New York

Elmira, N.Y.Jan.24.–Francis Schneider, a former manufacturing jeweler of Maiden Lane, New York, committed suicide Monday at the Glen Springs sanitarium in Watkins, where he was a patient, by shooting himself in his left temple. The coroner's jury decided that he came to his death in the foregoing manner.

The remains were shipped to New York. He is survived by a wife and family. The deceased entered the sanitarium about one year ago; he was suffering with melancholia.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 31st January 1894

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 26, 2014 6:09 am

WILLIAM ROE

London and Birmingham

DEPRESSION IN THE JEWELLERY TRADE

SUICIDE OF A JEWELLER

A sad case was investigated by the Central Middlesex Coroner on Thursday, the 27th ult., arising out of the depression in the watchmaking and jewellery trades. William Roe, living at 280, Upper Street, Islington, had come to London from Birmingham to work for a London Jeweller and watchmaker, but owing to the prevailing depression in the trade he was thrown out of employment nine weeks ago. Last Monday he went to his old employers, feeling that they would be sure to employ him again, but to his bitter disappointment he found that business was so bad that they had been obliged to discharge some hands. He went home and told his wife there would have to be an end to this kind of thing, and went into the kitchen, where he drank cyanide of potassium, which killed him in half an hour. The jury who inquired into the case of his death were advised by Dr. Thomas to return a verdict of suicide while insane, and this they accordingly did.


Source: The Jeweller and Metalworker - 15th June 1886

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 27, 2014 5:37 am

TUSTIN DIBBLE

Unadilla, New York

Tustln Dibble Killed While Trying to Save Another

Unadilla, N. Y., Oct. 13.–While attemping to save a fellow townsman from being run over by a railroad train, Tustin Dibble, an old and well known jeweler of this town, was fatally injured, Sunday afternoon, and died a few hours later. The man whom he tried to save was killed. Mr. Dibble had seen his fellow townsman's danger and rushed to his rescue, grabbing him just as the train struck. The force of the blow hurled Mr. Dibble into a ditch from which he was picked up unconscious. On examination it was found that his left arm was literally crushed for about three inches each side of the elbow, and that the left leg was also badly crushed below the knee. Both were amputated. The injuries were caused by the blow, the wheels not touching either man. Mr. Dibble's pulse grew stronger during the operation and it was thought that he might rally; but a short time later, though there was not a bruise to be found on his body, he showed evidences of having been internally injured, and died at 4 o'clock.

Mr. Dibble was one of Unadilla's best known merchants, and with his son, G. Halsey Dibble, conducted a successful jewelry business in this place. He was born in Franklin, Delaware, in 1832, and located in Unadilla in 1857, engaging in the carriage manufacturing business. Then going to Harpersville, he resided on a farm four years, and returning to Unadilla formed a partnership with Perry Smith under the firm name of Smith & Dibble. This continued for about three years, after which Mr. Dibble assumed the entire ownership, continuing thus for 11 years.

About 1885 he disposed of his business and removed to Georgia, where he remained about a year, returning to Unadilla in 1886. Here he again established himself, in company with his son, in the jewelry business, which has since been continued.

In eulogy there is naught that Tustin Dibble does not merit. His life was exemplified by the noble act in which he lost that life. By his removal on Sunday is left to all citizens of Unadilla and vicinity the acute sense of a precious friendship broken and the memories of a delightful friend. He was a kind man, a gentle man, a modest man, wholly free from selfishness, with a love of quiet and peace as strong as his love of home and its happy associations.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 19th October 1898

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 29, 2014 3:14 am

GEORGE H. HARRIS

Byron, New York


Geo. H. Harris Dies from An Attack of Hiccoughs

Erie, Pa., Aug. 11.–Geo. H. Harris, a jeweler at North East, started on his bicycle for Findlay's Lake on Monday and when he arrived there he was warm and thirsty and at once took several drinks of very cold water. He was soon affected with a severe attack of hiccoughs, which could not be stopped. He suffered for several hours in great agony before death ensued. Everything possible was done to save his life.

The remains were taken to the former home of the deceased, at Byron, N. Y., by a business partner and mother and sister of deceased.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 17th August 1898

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 30, 2014 12:18 pm

JAMES A. LINCOLN

Springfield, Massachusetts

$100,000 HID AWAY

Lived a Miserly Life - Was Retired Jeweller

Springfield, Mass.: Announcement was made public of the discovery of $100,000 worth of diamonds and other precious stones, jewelery, watches, gold and silver ornaments and coin, belonging to James A. Lincoln, whose body was found two weeks ago in the solitude of his miserly home on State Street. Lincoln was a recluse, who for years had refused even to speak with his sister and only relative, Miss Hattie Lincoln, who falls heir to the fortune he leaves. He kept his home at 553 State Street, opposite the United States armory, closed and the curtains drawn, and admitted no one.

Neighbors saw little of the strange man, who only left the house to buy provisions, and his peculiar traits passed unnoticed until a disagreeable odor attracted attention to the house and his body was found in the kitchen by the police, who were called upon to investigate. He was found Aug. 27, and had been dead a week or 10 days.

Lincoln was a jeweler, who years ago carried on a successful business and was known to have gathered considerable property, how much no one but he knew, but it was believed to be not more than $20,000. After his burial search was made for his money and valuables. A safe and trunks were broken open. Hundreds of diamonds, large and small, some set in costly rings with precious stones, scores of watches, handfuls of beautiful rings, quantities of old coins of great value, chains, charms, silver-mounted pistols, gold necklaces and stick pins - these were some of the riches that for many years had lain hidden.

Aside from a quantity of fine clothing and costly furnishings and a diamond ring valued at $1,000, little of worth could be found at first. A safe discovered in a locked room had to be broken open and here the first discovery of the miser's fortune was made. He weighed 500 pounds and had a heavy black beard.


Source: Reading Eagle - 9th September 1901

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed May 14, 2014 1:58 pm

JOHN BAILEY

Gorham Mfg. Co., Providence, R.I.

John Bailey, the young man who committed suicide by hanging while in a cell in the Central Police Station last week, was an employe of the Gorham Mfg. Co. His relatives say that for some little time past he had not been in good spirits, and they think that he was temporarily deranged mentally when he committed the act.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 13th August 1902

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu May 15, 2014 2:53 pm

C. HORNEF

Honolulu

The remains of C. Hornef, a Honolulu, H. I., jeweler, who mysteriously disappeared from that place a year ago, were found recently in the Diamond Head Crater. They were identified by the clothes and belongings and the teeth fillings of the deceased.

At the time of his disappearance many searches were made for him without success. One of the soldiers at Camp McKinley reported the find to the police and the identification was easily accomplished. It is supposed that Mr. Hornef committed suicide.


Source: San Francisco Call - 5th August 1902

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun May 18, 2014 7:17 am

LOUIS BANGS

Shreve & Co. and Bangs & McLeod, San Francisco


Death of Louis Bangs

San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 6.–San Francisco jewelers were much shocked at the sudden and tragic death of Louis Bangs, of the firm of Bangs & McLeod, wellknown engravers of 140 Geary St.

Mr. Bangs was motoring with a friend in the Mission district late on the evening of Sunday, Nov. 26, when he put on the brakes, in order to avoid a collision. The car skidded and both occupants lost their lives. Louis Bangs was a native of San Francisco and was 32 years of age at the time of his death.

He was with Shreve's for about 13 years and had been in partnership with C. McLeod for the past four years.

The deceased is survived by his mother and a brother.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 13th December 1922

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu May 22, 2014 3:48 am

MYER ARNSON

The remains of Myer Arnson, a jewelry peddler, were found near Addison, N. Y., on the Erie tracks, last Tuesday morning. Both of Arnson's legs were cut off at the same point just below the ankles. Two large gashes were discovered at the base of the brain as if he had been struck with a blunt instrument. He was known to have bought a ticket to Elmira. No ticket was found on his body, nor any money except $1.19 in change. He is thought to have had considerable money as he is known to have always carried large amounts on his person.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st November 1893

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