Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 25, 2018 2:31 pm

JOHN SILVERSIDE

London


DISTRESSING CASE OF MANSLAUGHTER BY BOYS

At the London Guildhall Police-court; Wm. Martin, Geo. Gabriel, Francis Jas. Burton, and Matthew John Cooper, four boys, the eldest of whom was only 16 years of age, were charged before Alderman Phillips with assaulting and causing the death of John Silverside, aged 54, a silversmith, of 4, Brown's-buildings, Clifton-street, Finsbury.

Henry Bryant, a diminutive lad of 15, said he was potman at the Three Colts, in London-wall, and saw all the prisoners striking the deceased in front of the Albion Hall, London-wall, soon after which Martin picked up a stone and gave it to one of the other prisoners, and said, "Take this, and cut his head open." The one that received the stone threw it at the man: it struck him on the head and he fell, upon which the prisoners all ran away.

James Morris, a carman, said he saw a number of boys apparently fighting outside the Albion Hall. He saw the stone thrown, and the four boys run away. The man staggered and fell immediately the stone was thrown, and as the boys passed him he heard one exclaim, "What did you want to hit him so hard for ? That was said, he thought, by Cooper.

Mr. Quentin Dalrymple, a bookseller, of 67, Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields, said he was at the Albion Hall on Monday evening, and when he was leaving he observed some boys creating a disturbance. Two boys were fighting and the deceased was agitated in consequence of his son being attacked by the other boys. He remonstrated with one of the boys, and while talking with him he saw the deceased stagger and caught him as he was falling. Witness thought it was merely a fit, so laid him on the ground and unfastened his cravat, and bathed his face with cold water. There was a little blood on the mouth, but there was no animation in the deceased except a slight convulsive movement, which proved to be the death struggle.

Stephen Silverside, the son of the deceased, said he was with his father on Monday evening at Albion Hall, and in consequence of a great noise being made by a lot of boys running up and down the passage, witness and his father cautioned them and closed the gates, but they were several times forced open by the boys from without, upon which witness and deceased came out to give them into custody. Gabriel closed with witness, and they fell. When he got up, Gabriel struck deceased in the mouth and made it bleed. His mother told him (witness) to go inside, and he did, but when he came out again he saw his father leaning on the arm of the last witness. Burton and Cooper he had known before, and they were there and very disorderly.

The evidence of several constables was then taken, but the facts elicited were of minor importance.

Alderman Phillips said it was a most serious matter for all the prisoners, and as the coroner's inquest had not yet been held, he would remand the case for the verdict of the coroner's jury and the evidence of the surgeon who attended the deceased. An application to bail the prisoners was peremptorily refused.


Source: The Illustrated Usk Observer and Monmouthshire Central Advertiser - 2nd February 1861

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 27, 2018 4:51 am

LEWIS W. HULSE

Goshen, New York


Lewis W. Hulse, Goshen, N. Y., Commits Suicide in Jersey City

Lewis W. Hulse, who was at one time a retail dealer in jewelry in Goshen, N. Y., committed suicide in a car at the Erie Railroad Station at Jersey City, N. J., Friday, by shooting himself twice with a revolver.

Mr. Hulse, who had been receiving medical treatment at a Sanitarium in Goshen, came to New York, Thursday, and registered at the Herald Square Hotel. He left there Friday morning, and about 3 o’clock in the afternoon boarded the train for Goshen. As the train was about to pull out, he fired the shots which caused his death.

The jewelry business which the deceased conducted was sold in March, 1902, to E. G. Swezey. It was established about 50 years ago by Chauncey Hulse, father of the deceased, who admitted his son into partnership, after conducting the business successfully for more than 30 years. The deceased was 45 years old.

He leaves a widow and two children, and was buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 4th May 1904

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 30, 2018 5:37 am

SAMUEL HAGUE Jnr.

Milford, Connecticut


Samuel Hague, Jr., for several years with the Milford Silver Co., committed suicide Jan. 25 at a New Haven hotel. His son in Little Falls, N. Y., took charge of the remains.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 4th February 1903

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Dec 02, 2018 5:23 am

WILLIAM TOSWITCH

Holloway, London


OCTOGENARIANS SUICIDE

At Islington on Tuesday a verdict of Suicide whilst temporarily insane was returned in the case of William Toswitch, 84, who shot himself. The deceased was a retired jeweller of Holloway.

A doctor stated that it was very unusual for a person of that age to take his own life. He had suffered from locomotor ataxy.


Source: Weekly Mail - 15th August 1908

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 08, 2018 4:22 am

FEARHURST

Hereford


EXTRAORDINARY ATTEMPT AT SUICIDE

At Hereford, on Saturday, a jeweller named Fearhurst, who had, for a trifling offence committed whilst in a state of intoxication, been locked up, was found, when visited by the turnkey, to have fearfully mutilated himself by beating his head against the walls of the cell. He was shortly afterwards given some tea, and an officer was attracted to his cell by the smashing of the crockery. The prisoner warned the officer not to enter the cell, but he did so, and prisoner bit a large piece out of the jug and struck the constable down with the remainder of it. He then commenced to saw at his own throat with the piece he had bitten off, but was overpowered. He, however, tore open the wounds he had inflicted in his throat. A surgeon was called in, and he found the prisoner mad with delirium tremens. He is not yet out of danger.


Source: The County Observer and Monmouthshire Central Advertiser - 19th June 1869

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Dec 12, 2018 5:56 am

SHUTE & Co.

Fredericton, New Brunswick


An awful mistake took place in Fredericton, N. B., Wednesday night, resulting in the death of two leading citizens, Messrs. Edgecombe and Tibbitts. Both men were sitting in the rear of Shute & Co.’s jewelry store with D. E. Crowe, a member of the firm, when the latter was called to the front of the store. The two men, seeking a drink of water, found a jar on the sink and drank of its contents. It contained cyanide of potassium. When Mr. Crowe returned he learned of their fatal error, and hurried them to a drug store, where three doctors were called in. In spite of all efforts, however, death took place in both cases.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 22nd August 1906

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Dec 16, 2018 5:27 am

LEON WALKER - (WATSON COMPANY)


Leon Walker, aged 46, a plumber employed by the Watson Co., was instantly killed last Wednesday morning when a crude oil tank of 15,000 gallons capacity at the plant exploded. He was engaged in checking up the amount of gasoline being put in the tank when the accident occurred and he was blown to pieces.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 26th December 1923

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 21, 2018 5:18 am

HENRY BODEKER

Court Street, Faversham



ROBBERY AND SUICIDE OF AN ABSCONDING WATCHMAKER AND JEWELLER

An inquiry was on Tuesday held in the board-room Of St. George's workhouse, before Mr Payne, the coroner for the City of London and Southwark, relative to the death of a man whose name was believed to be Bodeker, aged 48 years, which took place under the circumstances detailed in the subjoined evidence.

Mr. George Aldcroft deposed that he kept a coffeehouse in Alfred-place, Newington. On Thursday week the deceased, whom he did not know, came to the house and was provided with a lodging. He then appeared in very good health, and stated that he had come from the country to London on business. On Wednesday night last he proceeded as usual to bed, but not making his appearance on the following morning, witness went up to his room to call him, when he found the door fastened, and not receiving any reply after repeated knockings the door was burst open. The deceased was then found lying on the floor in a senseless state. A surgeon was sent for who pronounced life to be extinct.

James Cox, a lodger in the house, corroborated the above testimony, and also stated that the deceased had told him he was a watchmaker, and had come from the country to take away his daughter, who was too fond of Spurgeon's religion. The deceased seemed perfectly well in health, and not in want of money.

Police-constable 294 M deposed that he searched the deceased, and found three duplicates relative to watches, brooches, &c., pawned in different names in the country and London.

Mr William Turner, surgeon, of Alfred-place, stated that he was called in to see the deceased and found him as described. He had evidently been dead some time, and on searching the room he found a bottle which had contained cyanide potassium. The bottle was on the shelf with a cork in it, but the deceased could have placed it there after taking the contents, and then fallen where he was found, but he did not appear to have struggled much. He (witness) had made a post-mortem examination, and from that he ascertained that death had resulted from the cyanide of potassium which he had taken.

After some further evidence the inquiry was adjourned, when the following additional facts were ascertained by Mr Cooke, the coroner's officer. In reply to communications sent to Faversham, Sittingbourne, and Canterbury, places to which the duplicates found upon the deceased related, it was ascertained that the deceased was Mr Henry Bodeker, a watchmaker and jeweller, carrying on business in Count Street, Faversham. Mr C. White, the head constable of Canterbury, arrived in town and at once identified the body, and stated that the deceased had absconded after pawning watches and other articles left with him to be repaired and that he had left behind a wife and five children, the former just in her confinement.

Letters were also received from two pawnbrokers in Faversham and Sittingbourne relative to some of the property pledged, and stating that in consequence of the robberies the police had been communicated with and were in search of the deceased.


Source: The Pembrokeshire Herald and General Advertiser - 26th August 1864

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 22, 2018 5:33 am

RICHARD HOLLIDAY

Birmingham


On Saturday Richard Holliday, 27, a jeweller, was remanded for attempting to commit suicide at Birmingham. Prisoner, who had been drinking heavily, went to his sister's house, and, seizing a knife, stabbed himself 28 times, when the instrument was snatched from him. The wounds were all slight, the man being to intoxicated to strike sufficiently heavy to cause a fatal wound.

Source: The Tenby Observer - 3rd July 1884

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 27, 2018 6:11 am

THOMAS ELLERAY

Manchester


SUICIDE OF A YOUTH

On Wednesday morning last, Mr. Louis Beaver, watchmaker and jeweller, on reaching his shop in Cross-street, between eight and nine o'clock, was surprised to find that it was not, as usual, open. A lad named Thomas Elleray was in the habit of steeping on the premises, but as Mr. Beaver was unable to obtain admission alter knocking some time, he proceeded to the police station at the Town Hall, and obtained the assistance of Inspector Maybury. A hole was then cut in one of the panels of the door, and entrance having thus been obtained, Elleray was found hanging from a nail in the shop. The body was at once cut down - life was quite extinct. It appears that Elleray, who was about nineteen years of age, had been for seven years in Mr. Beaver's employ as shopman for the last four years he had slept in the shop and at the time of his death he was receiving 3s 6d. per week and his board. For several weeks he had been in a very desponding state, but neither his mother, his sister nor Mr. Beaver, could discover any cause for his being so. He had more than once complained that he feared he had spent too much money during a trip which he took last summer to the Isle of Man, and he once told Mr. Beaver that he feared that he had not done his duty. Mr. Beaver several times endeavoured to rally the deceased, and he had promised him an increase of salary. On Tuesday evening last, with a view to cheer the deceased, Mr. Beaver treated him and his sister to the theatre, and as soon as the curtain dropped the deceased, turning to his sister, said, "All's over now I shall never see another play." His sister took but little notice of this, but after she had bid him "Good night "at the shop door, he said," All's over in this world. His sister replied, "Oh, nonesense! unless you mean to do something to yourself;" to which he rejoined "Oh no! I have not courage for that." From this time nothing was seen of the deceased until he was found hanging, as we have stated. In order to effect his purpose he had taken a clock from a nail in the shop and then, after fastening some clock cord to the nail had mounted a step ladder, fastened the other end round his neck, and threw himself off. On searching the deceased, a piece of printed paper was found in one of his pockets, apparently cut from some penny publication, and contained "Observations on suicide." We understand that Mr. Beaver had always found the deceased most attentive to business; and for some time he had allowed his mother 2s. per week out of his earnings. An inquest was held on the body on Wednesday afternoon, by Mr. E Herford, borough coroner, at the Grapes Inn, Tib-lane, when a verdict was returned that the deceased had hung himself during a fit of temporary insanity.


Source: The Manchester Guardian - February 1850

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 31, 2018 6:07 am

JOSEPH GILBERT

St. Louis


Joseph Gilbert, proprietor of a jewelry store at 1625 Market St., who was accidentally shot in his store on the night of Jan. 10, by Jacob Good, a pawnbroker at 820 Market St., died, last week, after he had been discharged from the city hospital, whither he was taken after the shooting. It
was expected that he would recover, but complications set in after he left the hospital. Good surrendered to the authorities immediately upon hearing of the death of his friend, but he was released by the coroner’s jury the following day, the jury finding that the shooting was wholly accidental and without malicious intent. Mr. Gilbert, on the day he was shot, had opened up a new store and Mr. Good had called upon him to inspect it. Seeing a revolver on the counter he picked it up to examine it, when Gilbert warned him. Hardly had he uttered the words when the weapon was discharged and the bullet tore through Gilbert’s breast and lodged in his back. Mr. Gilbert completely exonerated Mr. Good before his death.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 5th February 1908

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 28, 2019 5:16 am

CHARLES H. SAVAGE - MIDDLETOWN SILVER Co.

Middletown, Connecticut


Death of Charles H. Savage

Middletown, Conn., July 27.—Chas. H. Savage, who was formerly President of the Middletown Silver Co., committed suicide last night at his home at South Farms by shooting himself in the head. The deed was committed in the presence of his wife and children, and the cause of it has not been disclosed. He was well known, and his friends and acquaintances were shocked when they heard of his lamentable end.

Mr. Savage was instrumental in forming the Middletown Silver Co., which was organized here soon after the old Middletown Plate Co. was absorbed. He was thoroughly familiar with the silverware business and was especially successful as a salesman. Since he relinquished the position of president of his company he had traveled for it.

In a number of social organizations Mr. Savage was quite prominent, among them the local lodge of Elks of which he was a charter member. He is survived by his wife, a son and three daughters.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd August 1905

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 30, 2019 5:30 am

GEORGE CURLING COX

Whitehaven, Cumberland


FRIGHTFUL ACCIDENT AT WHITEHAVEN

In the course of last week a large new locomotive engine arrived at the terminus of the Whitehaven Junction line, for the Whitehaven and Furness Junction Railway, which is to opened at an early date. On Friday it was proposed to remove this machine to the new station in Preston-street, but in consequence of unfavourable weather it was delayed. On the following afternoon, Mr. Dees, the superintending engineer, with between thirty and forty labourers, proceeded to remove it by means of a number of moveable rails. The engine had almost reached the house of Mr. George Curling Cox, a jeweller in the latter street, when that gentleman stepped off the path to render what assistance he could by pulling at one of the ropes. It suddenly moved, and at the same moment Mr. Cox's foot slipped under the rail. He endeavoured to kick it out with the heel of his other foot, when the front wheel of the locomotive came upon it, and crushed it to a frightful extent. The lower part of the leg was almost separated from the upper portion. The poor man fell backwards into the arms of a bystander, and the engine being stopped ere the other wheel had reached him, he was extricated from his perilous position, and removed home. He survived his frightful injuries but a short time. The deceased gentleman was thirty-six years of age, and has left a wife and seven children.


Source: The Carnarvon and Denbigh Herald - 14th July 1849

The inquest returned a verdict of 'Accidental Death'

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 02, 2019 5:53 am

PETER PEROO

New York


FOUND WITH HIS THROAT CUT

Was Silversmith Peroo Murdered or Was He a Suicide ?

Peter Keeterman, His Roommate, Arrested on Suspicion


Charles Hack, a tenant on the top floor of 366 West Nineteenth Street, went Into the cellar of that house at 4.30 o'clock this morning to get some wood. As he passed an open closet be saw a half-clad man lying doubled up In a corner. There was a gaping wound that reached from ear to ear In the man's throat and blood formed a big pool around him.

Without waiting to see if the man was dead Hack summoned a policeman and notified Mrs. Fannie Ablett, on the first floor, from whom the man had rented a furnished room, he was Peter Peroo, a Finlander, and was employed as a silversmith in Tiffany's establishment.

Two months ago, together with a friend named Peter Keeterman, also employed In Tiffany's, Peroo went to live with Mrs. Ablett. Neither was married and both seemed to be quiet, industrious workmen.

Why Peroo should kill himself is not known, and although there Is a suspicious circumstance connected with his death, the police do not think he was a victim of foul play.

The razor or knife with which the deed was committed cannot be found. The police believe Peroo threw it into the uncovered closet near which he was found.

Keeterman acted very strangely and appeared unduly excited when Informed of his friend's death. He does not speak English, and Peroo's desperate deed was made known to him by drawing a finger across his windpipe. He probably Interpreted this as a threat to kill him.

He dressed himself hurriedly and was about to leave the house, when he was arrested by the detectives of the West Twentieth street station, who took him to the Jefferson Market Police Court, where he was remanded.

Peroo left no letters that could be found. When his body was discovered It was dressed in a night shirt and a pair of trousers. The Coroner was notified.


Source: The World - 4th April 1892

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 03, 2019 5:46 am

ALBERT NOLTE

New York


SUICIDE OF A SILVERSMITH

He Lost Money In Speculation and Finally Lost His Job


Albert Nolte, 60 years old, a silversmith, commltted suicide In the early hours of yesterday morning by hanging himself In the bathroom of his flat on the top floor of the four-story tenement at 48½ Seventh street. Nolte had been out of employment for the past ten months. He came to this country from Dresden forty years ago, and prospered until a few years ago.

Then he began to speculate In real estate and lost money. He lost hls place finally and could not get another. Young men had forced their way Into the silversmith trade, and there was no use for old hands. He drank four glasses of beer In a neighboring saloon after spending Thursday In trying to get work, and then went home and killed himself.


Source: The Sun - 25th September 1897

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 04, 2019 1:59 pm

THEO. WILLIAM GOUNDELOUCH

Alexandria, Virginia


Suicide - Theo. William Goundelouch, a well known silversmith of this city, committed suicide shortly before one o'clock to-day by shooting himself in the head. For the past few days Mr. Goundelouch had been in an excited condition, and at the time of his suicide his nerves were in a high state of tension. He had several times signified his intention of taking his life and thus terminating all his troubles and anxieties,real or imaginary, and shortly before committing the rash act had been conversing with some friends and exhibiting the pistol. Quitting them, be entered the alley adjoining the Columbia engine house on the north and after proceeding some distance into it drew a 32 calibre pistol of the Russian model pattern from his pocket and placing the muzzle above the right temple pulled the trigger, sending the ball entirely through his head and out on the other side, the brain protruding from the wound. A boy who was passing the alley at the time heard the report of the pistol and looking in the direction from whence the sound proceeded saw the unfortunate man lying upon the ground, and entering the engine house informed several parties that a man had shot himself in the alley. A crowd soon collected around the dying man when Dr. Jones was summoned, and on arrival and examination of the wound pronounced it fatal, and he expired in a few seconds. The deceased was born in Leipzig, Prussia, 67 years ago, and came to this country when a young man. During half of his life time he resided in this city, working at his trade in the different jewelry stores here. He went South at the breaking out of the war, returning to this city at its close, where he had ever since lived. Mr. Goundelouch was of a jovial nature, perfectly harmless, and was liked by all who knew him. His remains were taken to Mr. B. Wheatley's undertaker's establishment, from which place they will be interred to-morrow evening at 4 o'clock.

Source: Alexandria Gazette and Virginia Advertiser - 28th June 1886

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Feb 08, 2019 4:22 am

WILLIAM W. CRINDLE

San Francisco


Wm. W. Crindle, jeweler, at the corner of 12th and Webster Sts., has been charged with insanity.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 8th August 1894

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:11 am

THOMAS BRYCE

Edinburgh


A shocking case of cruelty and neglect came before the Sheriff's Criminal Court, at Edinburgh, on Monday. A working jeweller, named Thomas Bryce, and his wife, residing in South Elgin Street, pleading guilty to neglecting to supply their four children-aged respectively three months, and three, five, and seven years—with food and clothing, and reducing them to such a state of emaciation and weakness that their lives were endangered. The children, when found by the police, were in an indescribable state of filth. The prisoners were each sentenced to six months' imprisonment.

Source: The Cambrian - 24th March 1876

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 13, 2019 4:39 am

CALVIN KING

Richmond, Virginia


Richmond, Va., Jeweler Knocked Down in the Street by Wagon and Killed

Richmond, Va., Sept. 8.—Calvin King, a jeweler at 517 W. Broad St., was killed early Thursday morning, last, at Marshall St., this city. Mr. King, while standing in the street, was struck by a passing wagon and knocked to the ground. He received a fracture of the skull and died before he could be taken to his home. His body was removed to Billie’s undertaking rooms.

According to bystanders, Mr. King was about to cross the street and stepped from in front of an ice wagon going west in front of a carriage going east. The driver pulled up his horse and Mr. King was thrown to the sidewalk. An ambulance was summoned, but the jeweler passed away before anything could be done for him. The driver of the carriage was arrested and he declared that as he reined his horse the jeweler fell down and that neither the horse nor carriage struck him. He was held to wait result of the Coroner’s inquest.

Deceased is 44 years old and is survived by his widow, a, a mother, three brothers and a sister.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 15th September 1909

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Feb 16, 2019 4:34 am

THOMAS WHEELER

Preston


A Preston jeweller, named Thomas Wheeler, has been remanded on a charge of attempting to murder his wife. Mrs. Wheeler having sought refuge from her husband at the house of a friend, Wheeler called there on Sunday night, and, telling her that her days and his were numbered, made a rush at her with a revolver in his hand. Mrs. Wheeler escaped into another room and closed the door, and the prisoner discharged one of the chambers of the revolver. The bullet, fortunately, lodged in the frame of the door.

Source: The Rhyl Advertiser - 16th March 1878

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