Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 25, 2019 3:58 am

C.D. SEYMOUR

Hartford, Connecticut


Hartford, May 20. C.D.Seymour, who shot himself in the head here today, was born In New Britain December 31, 1820. He came to Hartford in 1836, where he learned the trade of a silversmith. He became a prominent and well known citizen, influential in politics, a member of the state democratic central committee, a member of the house, and a senator. The death of his only son, Oliver, who died of yellow fever in the south, threw him off his mental balance and he has suffered from melancholy ever since. His friends have lately suspected, that he intended to make way with himself and watched him closely, but he succeeded in eluding their vigilance.

Source: New Haven Daily Morning Journal and Courier - 21st May 1891

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 27, 2019 4:34 am

IRDAN MIGUAEL RICHAELIEU

Llanelly, Wales


THE CAVEY KING

Shoots Himself in an Empty House

LLANELLY MAN'S DELUSIONS


In the early hours of this morning a shot was heard in the empty premises lately occupied by Mr. I. M. Richaelieu, jeweller, Stepney-street, Llanelly. Mr. Morgan Williams, the next door neighbour, summoned the police, and Police-sergeants Jones and Thomas were quickly on the scene. An entry was effected through the basement, and on going upstairs they found Mr. Richaelieu lying in one of the bedrooms with a bullet through his temple. He was in great pain, and evidently in a critical state. He was removed to the union infirmary, where he now lies, attended by Dr. Roderick and Dr. Brooks.

Strange Writings on the Wall

Upon examining the walls of the room, Police-sergeant Jones found a series of sentences written in lead pencil, of which the following is a sample:—

It is after working 21 years for you, Mrs. Richaelieu, to have everything taken up by a legal clique, and lose you also. I care nothing for money. You, -, -, and -, know that if Lou would only let me see my darling child it would not be so bad. I have done nothing by word, deed, or thought to turn her against me like this. I would have done more and won you again. Now you won't let me see you or my child. I do hope my friends will clear my name and expose those who have lied to make you so bitter to the man whose worst thought was his love for you and his child. Now you - and - have ruined us and driven me to death. I think I hear police seeking me. I may be wrong, for there are always queer noises in this empty house - rats, I think.

The latest report from the infirmary is that the injured man is dangerously ill.

Mr. Richaelieu has had a remarkable career, and since his advent into Llanelly has figured in many capacities. Only recently he was the principal figure in an insurance arbitration case, following upon a fire at his premises. He made claims against several insurance companies, which were contested. After the close of these proceedings he was seized with sudden illness, and was removed to Swansea Hospital, suffering from loss of memory. He then went to London, and it was reported that he had afterwards gone abroad. In the meantime his stock-in-trade, &c., were sold at Llanelly by his wife, the sale lasting for a week.

A Dramatic Scene

One evening when the sale was proceeding Richaelieu suddenly entered the auction-room, and his dramatic gestures created such a panic that several women fainted.

Last year Mr. Richaelieu was imprisoned for six months, this being the sentence imposed upon him at the quarter session on a charge of theft from another jeweller at Llanelly.

After his release from prison his shop-window in Stepney-street was found to be covered over with reflections aimed at a local solicitor who happened to have been retained to prosecute in the charge referred to.

Before coming to Llanelly Richaelieu spent many years in South Africa, and brought back with him a valuable collection of curios, as well as a large quantity of gold. He was a great fancier of birds, and had won scores of prises with his cavies, of which he had an unequalled lot. In fact, he was known as the "Cavey King." His house was an extraordinary museum of living things, great and small, including monkeys, dogs, cats, lizards, snakes, an aquarium full of trout, eels, &c.


Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 8th August 1906



Optic Nerve Destroyed

RICHAELIEU LOSES HIS SIGHT


The Llanelly jeweller, Inire Richaelieu, who is alleged to have accidently shot himself through the head, is progressing favourably at Llanelly Workhouse Infirmary, he has lost his sight, the optic nerve having been destroyed. The bullet has not been extracted.


Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 11th August 1906



MR. RICHAELIEU PLEABS FOR A CHANCE

ATTEMPTED SUICIDE CHARGE AT CARMARTHEN

ACCUSED PROMISES TO GO TO AUSTRALIA


At Carmarthenshire Quarter Sessions on Friday (Earl Cawdor presiding) a true bill was returned against Irdan Miguel Richaelieu (40), jeweller, Llanelly, indicted for an attempt to commit suicide by shooting himself with a revolver.

Richaeiieu pleaded guilty. Mr. Lloyd Morgan, M.P., prosecuted; Mr. David Rees defended. Mr. Benson represented defendant's wife.

Mr. Rees said prisoner was an extraordinary character and led neighbours to believe he was not always responsible for his actions. He had gene in for such strange hobbies as keeping snakes, lizards, etc., so that he was shunned by neighbours. He had had financial and family troubles, which no doubt unhinged his mind, but after the pain he had gone through it was not likely he would do such a rash act again. Mr. Rees mentioned that if defendant went to prison he would be unable to undergo an operation which was necessary to his one sound eye, and counsel therefore appealed for leniency.

Richaeiieu pleaded for a chance to begin life afresh and said he would go out to Australia, where he had friends. He was bound over to be of good behaviour for three months.


Source: The Cambrian - 26th October 1906

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 29, 2019 12:09 pm

MICHAEL O'ROURKE

East Orange, New Jersey


LOSES JOB, KILLS HIMSELF

Coachman Had Been Employed by One Man for Eight Years


East Orange. N. J. May 7.—Broken-hearted because he was to leave the place in which he had been employed for the last eight years, Michael O'Rourke, coachman for George R. Howe a jewelry manufacturer of North Arlington avenue, committed suicide early this evening by hanging himself to a rafter in the Howe barn.

Mr. Howe went to the barn at 6.15 to bid his coachman goodbye. As he entered the barn he was surprised to see the form of O'Rourke dangling from a cross beam, suspended by a heavy rope. He cut the man down.


Source: New York Tribune - 8th May 1910

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 30, 2019 3:34 am

CHARLES COGGSWELL

Attleboro, Massachusetts


Chas. Coggswell, several years employed by G. W. Cheever & Co., Wednesday afternoon killed his wife and then committed suicide. Jealously was the cause. Coggswell was noted as an expert and faithful worker, and was a prominent Odd Fellow. The bodies were found in the road late at night.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 31st October 1894

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon May 06, 2019 6:52 am

CHARLES H. SCHILLER

Utica, New York


Fear of Business Embarrassment Urges Charles H. Schiller to Suicide

Utica, N. Y., Dec. 25.—Charles H. Schiller, a well known jeweler, shot himself this evening as a result of bad holiday trade. He had been in business more than 15 years. Three years ago his business fell off, and last June New York creditors pressed claims. Schiller partially met his obligations and relied on good holiday trade, but this disappointed him.

Mr. Schiller reached home at 7 o'clock. He passed his family in the dining room and went to his bedroom, where he killed himself. He recently built a home costing $12,000, which is heavily mortgaged, and had purchased a large holiday stock. On several occasions he had threatened to kill himself. He leaves a wife and seven children.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 27th December 1899

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri May 10, 2019 2:14 pm

PERCY SANSOME - F.G. TEBBUTT & Co.

Northampton


SHOT BY A BURGLAR

An alarming incident occurred at Northampton early on Monday morning, a man being shot and slightly wounded by a burglar, whom he disturbed in his thieving operations. The affair took place on the premises of Messrs. F. G. Tebbutt and Co., silversmiths, which are situated next to the Post Office, and are partly occupied by a caretaker. One of the shop assistants, named Percy Sansome, on arriving on Monday morning, heard a noise at the rear of the shop, and on hurrying to seek the cause, found a rough-looking man in hiding behind a counter. The intruder ran down the cellar, and there in the darkness a desperate struggle ensued. The burglar, finding herself overpowered, pulled out a revolver, and shot Sansome in the side. The bullet grazed his side under the armpit, and struck against the wall. The burglar then made good his escape. The report of the shot raised an alarm, and the police were quickly on the scene, but failed to find any clue to the identity of the burglar, as Sansome, who is now in the Northampton Infirmary, was unable, through the darkness, to give any detailed description. The booty of the thief includes some silver challenge cups which were on view in the windows.


Source: Rhyl Record and Advertiser - 11th November 1899

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon May 13, 2019 12:57 pm

FREDERICK TESTAR

London


SUICIDE WHILE ON BAIL

At North London, when the case of Frederick Tester, a jeweller, of Finsbury Park, was called, it was announced that the accused had committed suicide. The charge was one of being drunk and incapable. A police-constable announced to the magistrate that Testar was arrested at 7.30 on Thursday morning, and bailed out at 4.30 in the afternoon. Later on it was ascertained, that he had out his throat.


Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 28th October 1905

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed May 15, 2019 4:36 am

CHARLES DIETZ

New York


Chas. Dietz, a jeweler at 502 E. 88th St., was a prisoner in the Harlem Police Court Wednesday, charged with stabbing Chas. Reith, his landlord, with a pair of shears, during a fight caused by Dietz refusing to pay his rent. Dietz was held to await the result of the injuries of Reith, who is in the Presbyterian Hospital.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 11th July 1894

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu May 16, 2019 3:57 am

A. TRAUNWEISER

Cedar Rapids, Iowa


A. Traunweiser, of Cedar Rapids, Ia., a jeweler, shot and killed his wife Saturday and then fired a bullet through his own heart. Unhappy domestic relations.

Source: Rock Island Daily Argus - 1st June 1891

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun May 19, 2019 4:48 am

LOUIS BITZER

Turner Falls, Massachusetts


A BLOODTHIRSTY JEWELER

Kills His Clerk, His Son, Shot His Wife, two Daughters, Mother Also


Turner Falls, Mass., Jan. 1. Louis Bitzer, jeweler, shot and killed Ida Callum. his clerk, in his store today. He then went home and shot his son, Louis, dead and shot and wounded his wife and two daughters. The last three will recover. He tried to shoot his mother, but she prevented him. He probably Intended to commit suicide, but was prevented by the arrival of the police, who arrested him. The authorities think Bitzer Is Insane. He declared the shooting of his clerk to be accidental, and said he had become so overwhelmed by the act, fearing arrest for murder, that he went home determined to exterminate his family and then commit suicide, A note was found in his store explaining that the shooting of his clerk was accidental, and directing the disposition of his property.


Source: The Daily Ardmoreite - 2nd January 1902

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon May 20, 2019 1:47 pm

CHARLES NEWCOMBE

Barnsbury, London


AN OUT-OF-WORK TRAGEDY

Forty-nine years of age, Charles Newcombe, a journeyman jeweller, of Bride-street, Barnsbury, committed suicide by poisoning himself because he was unable to obtain employment.

"I can't get work, though I have tried," he wrote in a letter read at the inquest yesterday. "I am broken-hearted at this time of life. I do hope that my fellow-workmen will help my wife, Selina."

To his wife he wrote:-

Dear Selina,—Sell all you can. Don't spend much on the funeral. Sell my books to my fellow-workmen. It is very hard to go like this, but there is no prospects. They say I have been out of work so long.

"Suicide during temporary insanity" was the verdict returned.


Source: Evening Express and Evening Mail - 11th September 1906

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue May 21, 2019 12:50 pm

WILLIAM SLATER

London


At Clerkenwell, on Tuesday, William Slater, jeweller, was charged with attempting to poison Anne Bowden while drinking with her in a public house. Counsel, who appeared for the Treasury, now stated that prisoner would also be charged with poisoning Ellen Denworth, a woman of ill-fame, at Lambeth. This girl was found dying on the footpath, and it was stated that a man had given her some white stuff. Prisoner was identified as the man who had been with her. He was remanded.

Source: The Wrexham Advertiser - 14th November 1891

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed May 29, 2019 2:40 am

JACOB LANDSBERG

Marion, Indiana


Suicide of Jacob Landsberg

Louisville, Ky., May 30.—Jacob Landsberg, formerly a jeweler of Marion, Ind., killed himself by firing a revolver bullet through his head. He was despondent on account of long continued ill-health, growing from internal troubles of a complicated nature, which refused to yield to treatment and forced him to give up his business and search for health. He had been in Cincinnati, O., and Louisville hospitals, and had been in this city for the past four months. He was 50 years old and leaves a wife and one child.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 5th June 1901

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 02, 2019 5:27 am

EDWARD R. DARLING

Providence, Rhode Island


Edward R. Darling and his Wife Seriously Injured

Providence, R. I., June 1.—Edwin R. Darling, jeweler of this city, and his wife were the victims of a shocking experience while on their way from Attleboro to this city last night.

They drove to Attleboro early in the afternoon and were returning just after dark. Mr. Darling started to drive across the tracks of the Interstate Electric Railroad, when the motor car struck the buggy, completely demolishing it and precipitating the occupants upon the ground, Mrs. Darling being probably fatally injured. It is thought that she cannot possibly recover. Mr. Darling’s head on the left side was badly hurt.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 7th June 1893

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:27 am

JAMES HALL

Sheffield


A shocking murder was committed late on Saturday night at Sheffield by James Hall, spring knife cutler. He had had a quarrel with his wife and daughter respecting his having brought home no wages for a fortnight. The daughter, with her sweetheart, went out to market. The latter, named Dunkenfield, as he was leaving the door on their return, heard cries of murder, and entering the house, found Hall striking at his daughter's head with a hatchet, seriously injuring her before Dunkenfield could interfere. He next found the mother quite dead, her head being cloven in two.

Source: Western Mail - 28th March 1881

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 28, 2019 5:37 am

R.E. KING

Farmsdale, Alabama


A Practical Joke Ends in Shooting

Birmingham, Ala., Feb. 4.—R. E. King, jeweler of Farmsdale, Ala., was shot by Rudolph Hylton to-day and painfully though not fatally hurt. Hylton is a schoolboy aged 17 years. He and King became involved in a quarrel which originated from a practical joke. The lie was passed and Hylton drew a pistol and fired on King. The ball first went through Hylton’s hand, causing a bad wound, and then penetrated King’s left breast. Hylton is under a bond charged with assault with intent to murder.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 10th February 1892

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 29, 2019 5:46 am

JOHN SITZ

Fort Payne, Alabama


A Demented Jeweler Meets His Death by Drowning

Birmingham, Ala., Feb. 12.—John Sitz, for many years in the jewelry business at Fort Payne, Ala., met death near Gadsden a few days ago. He failed in business several months ago and soon afterward became demented. He went to Gadsden to live with relatives, and it was thought he was recovering.

Last Friday night he left home sudenly and search was instituted, and yesterday his dead body was found in the Coosa river, a mile below town. It is supposed that wandering about at night in a demented condition he fell into the river and was drowned. He was widely and favorably known.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 17th February 1892

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jul 07, 2019 5:13 am

PETER SAGOORD

Rice Lake, Wisconsin


Peter Sagoord, a young jeweler of Rice Lake, Wis., was drowned last Sunday while swimming in Pokegama lake.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 29th June 1892

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jul 14, 2019 3:22 pm

ABRAHAM MILLER

St. Louis


Watchmaker Abraham Miller, last week, carried out an oft-repeated threat to quit living after a violent quarrel with his wife over domestic finances. Miller, a Pole of 52, had sold his business at 1006 Franklin Ave., for $500; $400 of this money was in his wife’s hands, he having disposed of the other one-fifth within a few hours. He quarreled because he could not have the rest, and left, saying that they would never see him again. Returning, presumably with poison, he went to an attic room, and, when next seen, had been dead for five hours.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 20th March 1895

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Re: Some Macabre Stories of the Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 17, 2019 3:51 am

FREDERICK WILLIAM FENTON

Birmingham

EXECUTION IN BIRMINGHAM

Birmingham, Wednesday

Fred William Fenton, 32, a silversmith, was executed at Winson Green Jail, Birmingham, this morning, for the murder of Florence Nightingale Elborough, a barmaid, to whom he was engaged to be married. Fenton had misrepresented his position and means, and on the evening when he was to have brought her money for the purchase of furniture he shot her with a revolver, from the effect of which she died in a few days. He also inflicted severe injuries on himself, but afterwards recovered. An effort to obtain a reprieve on the ground of insanity was unsuccessful. There was a comparatively small crowd outside the jail. The culprit was perfectly resigned, and slept and took his food throughout in a manner that surprised the jail officers. He slept well that night, and also breakfasted well. Just on the stroke of eight the procession, headed by the chaplin repeating the burial service, arrived at the door of the small room where the execution took place. Billington, who was the executioner, quickly adjusted the noose, and the prisoner who appeared dazed, but otherwise unmoved by his position, was almost simultaneously pinioned. The white cap was drawn over his head and in an instant the lever was pulled and the body disappeared. The fall was perfectly perpendicular and the rope did not give the slightest possible Vibration. On looking into the pit immediately afterwards it could be seen it hung perfectly motionless, and death must have been quite instantaneous. The prisoner left no statement regarding the crime.


Source: Freeman's Journal - 5th April 1894

Frederick William Fenton was hanged on the 4th August 1894. It was noted that he was a metal spinner by trade, and had been employed at Messrs. Greensills of Tower Street, Birmingham, for 'some years'. The Birmingham Daily Post described Fenton as "a man short in stature and of slender build. He was only 5ft in height; his weight was 8st 2lb". Although the above newspaper account states that only a small crowd assembled outside the prison, other newspaper accounts estimate the crowd as being over a thousand in number.

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