Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Premises

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 18, 2013 6:39 am

The premises of The W.C. Edge Company, located at Newark, New Jersey:

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This image is from 1893.


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The W.C. Edge Co.
The artist who made the photo had the full conseption of his subject, as anyone will see at a glance, as he turns the pages of Newark Illustrated, and stops for a moment to study the finished picture as the engraver has so nicely and so expressively made its transference to the plates used in printing it here. Few plates presented surpass this, which is indeed, an elegant representative figure of the original. In these buildings are arranged the plant of the jewelry manufacturing industry conducted by The W.C. Edge Co., of which Mr. William M. Clark is president. Mr. Charles Edge, vice-president, Mr. W. C. Edge, treasurer, and Mr. Walter Edge, secretary. While it is saying nothing in derogation of the hundreds of artists, inventors and mechanicians whose wonderful mastery of the mechanics' arts, it is due that more than a passing notice should be given in this article to Mr. William C. Edge, who has won not only a lasting fame for himself, but has done so much, and perhaps more in the last decade toward the upbuilding of Newark's industrial greatness than manv men, who are more pretentious, engaged in like pursuits. Not unlike the great majority of our great inventors, mechanics and artists, it hasn't been all smooth sailing with the subject in hand. The ups and downs in his life have not been a few. In smoky London where he was born, he learned the jewelry trade with his father, and later was employed by several large jewelry firms in that great leading city of the old world's industries. In 1865 Mr. Edge came to America, where better opportunities offered for the pursuit of his calling. He first obtained employment of Chatelin & Spence, of New York, where he introduced what is now called satin finish. After a short period he came to Newark and entered the employ of Durand & Co., where he remained for several years, becoming acquainted with the new world methods. After this he started business for himself and on his own account supplying the large New York dealers. This had not been going on long when, through the machinations of a gentleman who had worked himself into Mr. Edge's good graces, becoming his partner, proving false, and finally compelling him to return to the bench. After working at the establishment of Miller Bros., where he introduced the method of turning over the edge of pins ear-rings, etc., now so common in collar buttons, he commenced business again, and later joined hands with Smiley & Dorrance. This firm afterward became known as W.C. Edge & Sons, but lately was incorporated under the New Jersey State laws as The W.C. Edge Company. This company is known and patronized throughout the United States as well as abroad, and are manufacturing goods under the protection of the patented inventions of W.C. Edge, but now the company's property. Woven wire fabrics of 14 carats fine, are a principal feature of their industry-. They also show a handsome line of other work in pure gold. This wire is also used in various weaves for saddlery hardware, upholstery work, fancy ornaments, dog collars, etc., etc. The latest inventions are "Edge's Excelsior Rein Holder," and patent "Aluminum Horse Shoe," which are a success. Being one of those undaunted spirits who never say fail amid the most trying ordeals, he kept working, and while others of his associates were spending their time where pleasure rules the hour, he was engaged in the more profitable employment of delving deep after hidden mysteries and unravelling the skein of the mysterious, around which are gathered so much of that undiscovered in the realm of science and art. Not so much was the searching of his busy mind engaged in the work of discovering new principles, but in the work of applying old ones in new ways.


Source: Newark, N.J. Illustrated - 1893

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 01, 2013 7:56 am

The premises of Leonard Krower & Son located at 536-538 Canal Street, New Orleans:

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This image is from 1920.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 04, 2013 9:44 am

Two interior shots of the premises of Day & Clark, located at the corner of Marshall and Halsey streets, Newark, New Jersey:


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Process department


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Finishing department

These images are from 1893.


DAY & CLARK
The really useful men of Newark are those who have lent a helping hand in the development of its manufacturing interests and aided in fostering those branches of trade for which the city is now widely noted. In no branch of skilled industry perhaps in the world, has more rapid advances been made than in the jewelers' art, and the industrial pursuits of a kindred nature. In former years, especially for the finer and more artistic productions in these lines, the American people were compelled to look to European countries for their jewelry supplies, but to-day American jewelry as produced in Newark, stands unrivalled in excellence of workmanship, beauty of design and cost of manufacture, by the best goods made in foreign countries. A prosperous, popular and thoroughly responsible firm devoted to this important line of industrial pursuits in the city of Newark, and well worthy of more than passing mention in these pages, is that of Messrs. Day & Clark, manufacturing jewelers, located at the southwest corner of Marshall and Halsey streets. The business was established in the present century, and has developed a large and influential trade with some of the leading houses in this city and throughout the entire country. Their products embrace everything in the line of solid gold hairpins, bracelets, brooches, necklaces, charms, chatelaines, lockets, collar and cuff buttons, scarf and lace pins, studs, gold mountings for diamonds and other rare and precious gems, etc. A specialty is the manufacture of novelties of rare and unique designs in solid gold, all of which are made by thoroughly skilled artistic workmen and guaranteed to be as represented, while the prices are very reasonable. The members of the firm are wide-awake, enterprising and courteous Newark gentlemen, reliable, honorable and prompt in their dealings, and justly merit the success they have achieved. A visitor to this great industrial centre could not spend a few hours to better advantage than in taking a look through this or some other representative jewelry manufacturing establishment, under the special guidance of one of the polite gentlemen of the proprietorship, any of whom would be glad at any time when not otherwise specially engaged, to show them the interesting parts of the business of manufacturing the jewelry seen almost everywhere as filling the show cases and safes of the retailers, or in wear by the thousands they meet on the street or at social gatherings. The premises utilized are spacious and commodious, comprising several departments, four of which our artist has given faithfully a portrayal of on these pages from photographs. They are admirably fitted up with all the latest improved machinery and appliances for business and manufacturing purposes.


Source: Newark, N.J. Illustrated - 1893

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 08, 2013 2:18 pm

An image of John Holland's Gold Pen Manufactory situated 19, West Fourth Street, Cincinnati:


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This image is from 1875.

The business was established in the year 1842. Its beginning was small, and it took years before it reached the magnitude it has now attained. It now ranks as the second largest manufactory of this class of goods in the United States, and the house has branches in New York, San Francisco, and other cities. For year after year it has received the contract for supplying the United States Treasury Department in Washington. The business of the house extends over almost every State of the Union, and it has made several shipments of Gold Pens to Europe. A complete description of the machinery and appliances of the factory would fill several pages of this book. The main productions, however, are fine Gold Pens and Pencil Cases, mounted in gold, pearl, ivory, ebony, rosewood, or silver; and gold, rubber, and silver mounted Tooth Picks. In the production of these articles the establishment is simply not outrivaled in the world.

Source: Illustrated Cincinnati - Daniel J. Kenny - 1875

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 09, 2013 2:55 pm

An image of the interior of Duhme & Co.'s premises situated at the corner of Fourth and Walnut Streets, Cincinnati:


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This image is from 1875.


The establishment of Duhme & Co., Jewelers, is situated at the corner of Fourth and Walnut Streets, only one square from the Postoffice.
The tourist who desires to see one of the finest jewelry salesrooms on the Continent will not be disappointed in visiting this. The internal arrangements are of the most complete order, and show to advantage a very rich display of Gold Jewelry, besides a large quantity of Silver Goods, upon some pieces of which great expense is incurred in order to give to them the character of art productions. Glass cases of articles in plate, combining the ornamental and useful for household use, are specially interesting, as showing the beautiful art of electroplating.
The word jewelry now-a-days means so much that it is simply impossible to enumerate all of the articles so designated. The following, however, includes almost enough ,to satisfy any ordinary visitor to this establishment: Decorative gold and silver plate, such as racing cups, testimonials, centerpieces, salvers, candelabra, etc.; table plate, such as soup and sauce tureens, dessert services, claret jugs, wine coolers, cruet frames, etc.; gold and silver-plated goods, electroplated goods, gilt and ormolu work for table and personal decorations of various kinds, jewelry containing precious stones, gold and silver jewelry without precious stones, etc., besides a miscellaneous assortment of articles; many of which would come under the designation of hardware goods as readily as under that of jewelry. The designers are noted for their consummate taste.
Attention can not fail to be directed to the Diamond and Precious Stone department, this house being the principal one engaged in this business in the West. French Bronzes, Clocks, Candelabra, etc., represent the finest work of foreign artists, while Epergnes, Cake and Fruit Baskets and table utensils illustrate the productions of the house. The manufacturing department is on the lower and upper floors of the building, and about 150 skilled artisans, artificers, and diamond setters are employed.
The house was established in 1836. The members of the firm are Herman Duhme and R. H. Galbreath. This firm is known as the most extensive jewelers in the West.


Source: Illustrated Cincinnati - Daniel J. Kenny - 1875

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Thu Oct 10, 2013 3:10 pm

The premises of Clemens Oskamp at located at 175 Vine Street and their manufactory at the corner of Harrison and Culvert Streets, Cincinnati:


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These images are from 1875.

The wholesale and retail Jewelry establishment of Clemens Oskamp is situated at 175 Vine Street; the manufactory at the corner of Harrison and Culvert Streets. The former has a frontage of 30 feet and a depth of 100 feet, and is five stories in height. The latter has a front of 25 feet and a depth of 100 feet, and consists of three stories. The business was established in the year 1844. In the retail salesroom there is displayed the finest assortment of Watches, Diamonds, Silver Ware, Jewelry, Clocks, Bronzes, and other articles in the Jewelry line.

The manufactory, which has been only recently fitted up, is a modern establishment in every sense of the word, and contains the newest and most perfect machinery and devices, by which the firm are enabled to turn out patterns of workmanship of the most exquisite and beautiful finish. In Table Ware the firm excel, their productions being considered equal to the best made Table Ware manufactured in this country. In elegant Jewelry, such as Cameo Sets, Roman Bracelets, fine Lockets, and the like, the articles of their production are unrivaled. Manufacturing and importing goods for the wholesale trade is the principal part of this firm's business, and during the season dealers from all parts of the country can be seen in their wholesale department laying in supplies; and their traveling salesmen reach all distant points at regular intervals with large stocks of goods.

The following remarks with regard to the general use of Jewelry are taken from the The Manufactory. British Report on Jewelry made at the late Vienna Exposition, and were published in the Freie Presse, of Vienna:

"The love of personal decoration is a sentiment which man shares with the animals, as a record of his connection with them in the chain of creation, which binds all organized being into one consistent whole. In modern times the naturalists of the Darwinian school have first, in the history of natural science, turned their attention to the effects of the various brilliant decorations of animals upon their success in the 'struggle for life,' and have already arrived at most valuable conclusions concerning it.

"It is nothing against some of the ornaments worn at present by ladies of fashion that they resemble those worn by their barbarian ancestors. Those who use them are not necessarily barbarians; but the fact only shows that the love of ornament is inherent in human nature, while its manifestations take on the various phases of the increased culture of the time.

"A lady who wears bracelets and ear-rings would be shocked by the suggestion that she should add to her attractions by wearing also a nose-ring, a lip-ring, or anklets; or that she should tattoo her face in fanciful patterns with brilliantly colored dyes. Yet many of her contemporary sisters still use all these appliances of ornament, and from the same natural and inherent tendency for decoration. The extent to which this has increased during the last decade justifies the estimate that, with the importations from abroad, there are consumed in the United States at least twenty millions of dollars' worth of jewelry a year. In modern times the improved processes of the arts, arising from the application of science to their methods and the introduction of the use of machinery, has so cheapened and increased the production of jewelry as to place within the reach of every one the ability to gratify his taste for it, as can be easily verified by any one who takes a look through Oskamp's retail jewelry house.

"In the United States the greater equality of our political conditions, together with the freer circulation of the results of industry, and the activity of our social life, has led to the almost universal use of jewelry."


Source: Illustrated Cincinnati - Daniel J. Kenny - 1875

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Fri Oct 11, 2013 5:30 pm

The premises of the D.F. Briggs Company at Allteboro, Massachusetts:

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This image is from 1908.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 14, 2013 3:03 pm

The premises of William Wilson McGrew located 152 West Fourth Street, Cincinnati:


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This image is from 1875.

The Retail Jewelry Salesrooms of Wm. Wilson M'Grew are situated at No. 152 West Fourth Street, between Race and Elm. This is one of the oldest establishments in the jewelry business in Cincinnati, having been established in the year 1805. The house has ever since, with only one brief interval, been in active operation. Many of the oldest pioneers of Cincinnati were customers of the firm nearly fifty years ago.
The establishment is noted for its tasteful displays in every thing appertaining to the decorative jewelry business. The most beautiful productions of the gold and silversmiths' handicraft may be inspected here, as well as the ordinary silver-ware and plated service.
The progress in taste in this, which may now justly be regarded as one of the arts, has been wonderful of late years. Cultivation seems to have blotted out forever the formal and angular ugliness of the eighteenth century and to have brought men back again to the purer modeling of antiquity, united with the love for the picturesque that has distinguished the most fertile periods of post - Christian times. It is no little thing, then, to say that in gold and silver work the jewelers of Cincinnati enjoy a rare preeminence.
The salesroom is fitted up with a degree of taste that harmonizes with its contents. A fine regulator, with the standard time, is one of the features of the establishment.


Source: Illustrated Cincinnati - Daniel J. Kenny - 1875

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 21, 2013 2:35 pm

The Premises of Tiffany, Young & Ellis, located on the corner of Broadway and Chambers Street, New York:


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This image is from 1847.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 09, 2013 3:01 pm

Not the greatest of images, but below is the premises of the jewellery wholesaler, Jacob J. Schmucler, located at 133-139, Canal Street, New York:


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This image is from 1920.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 02, 2013 11:38 am

Some images of the premises of manufacturing jewellers, D.R. Dingwall of Winnipeg:

Interior views:

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The above image is from c.1905.

Two images taken following the devastating fire that occured at Dingwall's manufactory at 62, Albert Street, Winnipeg in February 1921:


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Further information regarding the business of D.R. Dingwall Ltd. can be found at page 9 of: The Canadian Trade, Information, Advertisements, Etc.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Thu Dec 05, 2013 7:58 am

An image of premises of the jewellery manufacturers, Charles Schuetz & Son, located at 211, and 213, Mulberry street, Newark:


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This image is from 1893.


As we turn back the pages of Newark's industrial history, in our search after truth and data from which to formulate matter which will not only be read with interest, but will furnish such a regarnering of facts as well, from which future searchers may draw as from a spring of sweet waters, almost every page is found dotted over with facts and figures in regard to those interests which have their foundations in the manufacture of jewelry. As we have only to do with those engaged on general lines thereof, in this article, and at this time, it will be our purpose to show how large a part this industry has played in the upbuilding of Newark's greatness, as a manufacturing and business city, and what a bright prospective it presents for its future. Calling the attention of the reader to the part being enacted by Charles Schuetz & Son among the managers of the nearly one hundred establishments, which are co-workers in this special branch of industry, we open up a very interesting and not unprofitable study. The plant which has been gathered at No. 211 and 213 Mulberry street, will compare very favorably indeed, with any other in the city of Newark, selected and arranged for the manufacture of jewelry in a great variety of styles, lines and patterns. As the growth of the jewelry industry has been phenomenal for the past two decades we may assuredly look during the present, for a continuation just as great, and doubtless it will be greater still in the next decade. One fact in connection with the jewelry manufacturing industry in the city of Newark is especially notable, and that is while there is a pleasant rivalry among them, there is no perceptible attrition or jealousy, and taking them together they are indeed one family having one common interest, and in the continued growth and enlargement of the jewelry manufacturing interests equally interested and in a healthy onward and upward career for the city wherein are the homes of their skilled workmen and in the rapid growth thereof, for the happiness and prosperitv of employee, as well as employer. The career of the firm of Charles Schuetz & Son, now of No. 211 and 213 Mulberry street is in brief.


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Mr. Charles Schuetz, the senior member of the firm, was born in Germany, from whence he came in 1851, settling in this city and residing here ever since.


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Mr. Fred. A. Schuetz, the junior member, is a native of this city, attending and graduating from the Green Street German and English School and the Newark Academy.

The firm was established in 1876, originally locating in Crawford street, from whence removal was made in 1882, to the present eligibly located premises embracing two floors, each 30 x 100 feet in dimensions, equipped with every convenience and facility for the successful prosecution of the business. Employment is given to a force of seventy-five hands in the manufacture of every description of fine gold jewelry, the establishment having a deservedly high reputation for the superior quality of its productions. Only expert workmen are employed, and the most careful supervision is maintained over every detail of manufacture so as to secure the highest grade of excellence. The business has grown from its inception, and the firm has deservedly commended itself to the favor and confidence of the trade. This is only another of the many examples which Newark presents in this line of industrial pursuits, where thrift follows close on the footsteps of a watchful care of the minutest detail of a great business. A visit to the factory of Charles Schuetz & Son would convince the most exacting, after a moment's contemplation of the methods pursued, that the firm not only know how do business, but at the same time do it, in a way that is strict, but pleasing. When the roll of business success in this field where, if the term may be used, such a wonderful conglomeration of industries exist the name of Schuetz will be found written well up towards the head. Another proof in demonstration of the fact, that success follows fast where brain and brawn join hands in the race for the victors palm.


Source: Newark, N.J. Illustrated - 1893

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 21, 2013 3:17 pm

An image of the premises of the smelters, refiners, and assayers Goldsmiths Brothers, situated at at the corner of 58th and Throop Streets, Chicago:


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This image is from 1902.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Fri Dec 27, 2013 8:53 am

Some images of the various premises of the Gorham Manufacturing Company:


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Works of the Gorham Manufacturing Company at Providence, R.I.


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Main Office Salesrooms - Gorham Building - Fifth Avenue and 36th Street, New York City


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Branch Office Salesrooms - 15, 17 and 19, Maiden Lane, New York City


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Branch Office Salesrooms - 131 - 137, Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois


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Branch Office Salesrooms - 140, Geary Street, San Francisco, California

These images are from 1908.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 28, 2013 3:58 pm

An image of the manufactory of Rogers & Brother located at Waterbury, Connecticut:


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This image is from 1892.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 09, 2014 4:08 pm

An image of the manufactory of Reed & Barton located at Taunton, Massachusetts:


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This image is from 1901.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 06, 2014 6:32 am

An image of the premises of the Carter, Howe Company, located on the corner of Mulberry and Durrand Streets, Newark, New Jersey:


Image

This image is from 1912


Carter, Howe Company
IT would be placing too great a task upon public indulgence to expect interest in a forbidding array of statistical data, showing the present magnitude and commercial importance of the manufacturing industries of this section. Suffice it to say there are only ten cities in this great country which turn out annually products of greater value than those produced in Newark's factories, or employ a larger average number of wage-earners.

Especially conspicuous among the concerns that have been and are playing a prominent part in the jewelry trade is the house of Carter, Howe & Co., which began its existence in November, 1841, under the firm name of Pennington, Carter & Doremus. There are no records of any jewelry manufacturing establishment in Newark now in operation which started as early as or prior to this date, thus making this company the oldest concern of its kind in Newark.
The original site of the factory was on Broad street, just below Green. A short time after the inception of the enterprise, Aaron Carter, Jr., of the firm, bought out his partners and removed the business to a small factory on Green street near Broad. Soon after this event the firm changed to Carter, Pierson & Hale, and in July, 1853, the building at the corner of Park and Mulberry streets was purchased.

In 1873, as the business had then grown to a considerable extent, the building occupied was extended on Park and Durand streets and some new equipment added. A growing and satisfactory condition continued for some years when changes were again necessary and, in January, 1881, the firm name was changed to Carter, Sloan & Company. During succeeding years various changes have been made, and in 1902 the name Carter, Howe & Co. was adopted. At present there are six men associated with the enterprise, these being G. R. Howe, W. T. Carter, W. T. Gough, F. R. Horton, F. W. Stanbrough, and H. L. Farrow. The line of goods manufactured includes almost every description of 14 karat jewelry made of gold, from the medium priced goods to the most artistic productions seen in the American markets. The line includes bracelets, brooches, charms, cigarette cases, collar buttons, crosses, fobs, guard chains, key chains, lorgnettes, necklaces, and purses. These goods are sold all over this country by representatives of the company and are known to the trade in a most favorable light.

The company's employees number from two hundred and fifty to three hundred, many of whom are artisans of high skill receiving correspondingly high wages.
The factory is 100 by 120 feet in dimensions.

The company's New York offices are 9 to 13 Maiden Lane. For upwards of fifty years the manufacture of jewelry has been an industry in which Newark has excelled. Not only has more work been turned out by its jewelry manufactories, but the work is of such a high grade and character that Newark-made jewelry has become a byword–the trade standing for all that is best and most salable.


Source: Newark, the City of Industry: Facts and Figures Concerning the Metropolis of New Jersey - Published under auspices of Newark Board of Trade - 1912

See above post for details of the earlier company of Carter, Sloan & Company.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 06, 2014 6:41 am

An image of the premises of Durand & Co., situated at Franklin Street, Newark, New Jersey:


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This image is from 1912

Durand & Co.
The industry dates back to the year 1805, when the first factory was established here, and this number has increased year by year until to-day there are considerably more than a hundred plants. The city's proud boast of being the cradle of inventors applies to the jewelry industry as well as to others, for the city's pre-eminence in this field is as much due to the many improved types of machinery employed in fashioning dainty and costly conceits as anything else.

The standard of excellence established by Newark-made jewelry years ago has never diminished one iota, despite the fierce competition into which our manufacturers have been compelled to enter. They have come through with flying colors, received better prices, received larger orders, and, better still, each year shows a big increase in the value of the finished product.

One of the oldest and largest and best known manufacturers of jewelry and importers of precious stones in Newark, is Durand & Co. It was way back in 1830 when James M. Durand commenced the industry in a very small room with scarcely anything in his possession except experience in high class workmanship and a business energy which was far in advance of the times. He steadily gained favor and patronage, frequently added to his facilities, and in the fifty years he was personally active in affairs, built up a large and important business–firmly established the foundation upon which to-day stands the great manufacturing establishment whose superb goods are so well appreciated by the trade in every State of the Union. He retired in 1880 but lived until 1895 to enjoy the contemplation of the great success which had followed his efforts–which had been due to his personal integrity and business acumen. The house of Durand & Co. was a firm until September 19, 1892, when the concern was incorporated under New Jersey laws with a capital of $150,000.00. Wallace Durand, the president, is the son of the founder of the industry. He was born in Newark and is a practical expert in the jewelry trade. He was a partner with his father for ten years prior to the latter's retirement in 1880, and for nearly a half of the century it was his hand that guided the important establishment during that time and to his conservative yet progressive management is largely due the prosperity of the present day. His brother, W. B. Durand, the eldest son of the founder, was also a most important factor in the upbuilding and maintenance of the high prestige of the house during the forty years he was a member of the firm. He retired therefrom in 1891. His son, Harry Durand, the present affable and efficient secretary and treasurer of the company, has been with the concern since 1881. Henry C. Ward, the vice-president, has been associated since 1880, having been manager of the sales department since the incorporation in 1892. He is the son of Joseph G. Ward, who was formerly the vice-president, and who had been with the concern for half a century and partner for forty years.

All the officers of the company are members of prominent clubs and fraternal organizations. Durand & Co. manufacture fine gold jewelry of almost every description and make a specialty of diamonds, pearls and other precious stones, which it selects and imports specially for its high class trade. Its plant to-day embraces the entire four-story brick building with three stories in the rear which occupies 60 by 150 feet of ground area at Nos. 49 and 51 Franklin street, Newark. It is magnificently equipped and gives employment to upwards of a hundred and twenty-five first class jewelers. All business is directed from the office here, and dealings with its customers have been so satisfactory and agreeable that it has won a great reputation in the trade. There are five commercial travelers on the road and the jewelry houses that have the cream of the trade in their localities are steady patrons.


Source: Newark, the City of Industry: Facts and Figures Concerning the Metropolis of New Jersey - Published under auspices of Newark Board of Trade - 1912

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 06, 2014 6:51 am

An image of the premise of Charles Keller & Co., located at 213, Mulberry Street, Newark, New Jersey:


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This image is from 1912

Charles Keller & Co.
The manufacture and distribution of jewelry have long been prominent features in the industrial activities of Newark, and one of the most extensively known concerns engaged in the manufacture of a general line of jewelry is that of Charles Keller & Co., of 213 Mulberry street. This house dates back to 1876, when it was known as Charles Schuetz & Sons, and was located on Crawford street. In 1882, to meet the rapidly growing business interests, removal was made to Mulberry street, where they have since operated. Recently an imposing four-story and basement building has been erected, with special reference to their requirements, and the company own and occupy all of this modern structure It is an ornament to the business section of the city and one of the best equipped industrial institutions of its kind in this section.

Some idea of the growth of the business may be gained from the fact that while in 1893, employment was given to seventy-five persons, the pay roll now contains the names of three hundred persons. This fact alone is sufficient evidence that the concern understands the proper handling of gold and its manufacture into products of pleasing design.

In 1907 an incorporated company was formed, and a still wider field of business activity opened before the company. The present corps of officers is such as to command universal esteem and respect, and to hold the confidence of a large and growing patronage. Henry Untermeyer, of New York City, is president; Frederick A. Schuetz, of 55 Johnson avenue, Newark, is vice-president; Herman C. Schuetz, 755 Clinton avenue, vice-president; Emanuel Untermeyer, of New York City, is secretary; and Charles S. Untermeyer, also of New York, is treasurer. The company's main office is in New York City.

The products which are turned out from the Newark factory include a line of gold jewelry of almost every kind, which goods have a well merited reputation for excellence of workmanship, and high class design. Many of the employes are persons of the highest mechanical skill, and know exactly all the requisites of a piece of jewelry par excellence, and the most careful supervision is maintained over every detail of manufacture, which explains in part, the high reputation for superior quality of goods this house enjoys. The jewelry is distributed through wholesalers and jobbers. This, in brief, has been the history of this house which deservedly commends itself to the favor and confidence of the trade.

Frederick A. Schuetz and Herman C. Schuetz, who reside in Newark, are of the city's alert and progressive men of affairs, members of the Board of Trade and other important organizations, and stand ever ready to assist in promoting any worthy cause for the advancement of Newark.


Source: Newark, the City of Industry: Facts and Figures Concerning the Metropolis of New Jersey - Published under auspices of Newark Board of Trade - 1912

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Thu Feb 06, 2014 7:04 am

An image of the premises of Baker & Company, situated at 408-414, New Jersey Railroad Avenue, Newark, New Jersey:


Image

This image is from 1912

Baker & Company, Inc.
One of the most important concerns engaged in this city as refiners and workers of platinum, gold and silver, is Baker & Company, Inc. The business was established in the early seventies by Daniel W. Baker, Sr., for the manufacture of gold jewelry, and, for some years, was confined to this line; however, with the ever-increasing demand for platinum in the arts and sciences, especially in the electrical and dental fields, the importance and future of the metal was early recognized, and the company spent considerable time and large amounts of money in the development of this branch of its business. Papers of incorporation were granted to Baker & Company, lnc., in January, 1904, under the laws of the State of New Jersey. The company now has a capitalization of $750,000. The president of the company is Cyrus O. Baker, and the vice-president is his brother, Chas. W. Baker, both of whom are Newark gentlemen, members of the Board of Trade and other prominent organizations, and their varied business interests give them considerable prestige in the community. The offices and plant of Baker & Company, Inc., are located at Nos. 408-410-412-414 New Jersey Railroad Avenue, with a New York office in the Hudson Terminal Bldg. ( No. 30 Church Street). The plant, covering an entire city block, consists of four main buildings with an aggregate of ten floors.

In addition to the offices, the main building is devoted to the general manufacturing departments, where the metal is worked into wire, sheet, tubing, rivets, etc.

Building No. 2 is devoted to the refining, assay and research departments, and is fully equipped with the most modern apparatus for metallurgical and research work. The various salts and chlorides of platinum and the rare platinum metals are manufactured in this department.

Building No. 3, used exclusively for the manufacture of jewelers' settings and findings in both gold and platinum, was erected within the past few years. This department has enjoyed a rapid growth.

A new and modern factory and office building (180 feet x 50 feet) is now in the course of construction. The building will have three floors and a basement, is of concrete construction absolutely fire proof, and will be equipped with the most modern machinery adapted to this line.

Among the products of Baker & Company, Inc., in addition to those previously mentioned, are platinum, crucibles, dishes, anodes, cathodes, iridio platinum tubing, platinum in all forms and degrees of hardness, gold and silver sheet, wire and alloys.


Source: Newark, the City of Industry: Facts and Figures Concerning the Metropolis of New Jersey - Published under auspices of Newark Board of Trade - 1912

Trev.


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