The 19th-20th Century South And Central American Trade

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 09, 2014 8:36 am

ARTURO DE LA PENA

Cangallo 874, Buenos Aires


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Arturo De La Pena - Buenos Aires - c.1910

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 10, 2014 3:52 pm

MARCELO PARERES

Lima

Official statistics are lacking for the Peruvian jewelry industry, but private organizations estimate that there are about 350 working jewelers in the country, of whom about 150 are in Lima and Callao. This is confirmed by the Sociedad Nacional de Industrias, as well as by the jewelers' union, Union Fraternal de Joyeros. The latter was established in 1901, has 120 members, and is a mutual benefit rather than a protective organization, as it fixes neither wages nor hours of labor.
The native shops are a factor to be reckoned with, as all goods are made to order, no stock is carried, no salesmen employed, and overhead expenses are unusually low. As they are on the ground and in a position to give superior service, American firms will find them keen competitors. The only machinery used consists of hand cutters, rollers, and polishing heads. Working hours are usually from 8.30 to 12 and from 1.30 to 6.30, 8J hours per day for six days a week.
The largest shop is that Marcelo Pareres, of Lima, where 25 to 40 jewelers are employed as business warrants; none of the others has more than 10 men. Practically all the jewelers are natives, who on the whole turn out very commendable work. All goods are copied from French models, except imitations of Inca jewelry, which are made in quantities to satisfy the demand for antiques. Jewelers usually perform all the work necessary on an article and are paid by the piece. Wages in Lima average about $2.25 per day, $5 being the highest.
Practically all the jewelry is made of 18 k. gold, platinum, or silver, no plated jewelry being produced. It is customary to adulterate platinum with 30 to 90 per cent silver.


Source: Jewelry and Silverware in Chile, Bolivia, and Peru - United States. Dept. of Commerce, Samuel W. Rosenthal - 1919

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 11, 2014 3:30 pm

WELSCH & Co.

Peru

Perhaps the most difficult problem which our firms will encounter in this market is the sale and distribution of merchandise. Welsch & Co., a wealthy German firm, have a predominant position in the Peruvian jewelry trade, and the number of other firms devoted to this line that are worthy of any amount of credit is very limited. Most or all of them are retail firms located in Lima or Arequipa. As it is hardly likely that Welsch & Co. will give preference to American goods and as there are no other wholesale jewelers in Peru, no existing means are apparent for distributing our goods throughout the country. The parent corporation of Welsch & Co. is Ehni & Co., of Stuttgart, Germany. They maintain the finest equipped jewelry store and several smaller ones in Lima, two stores in Arequipa, and several in other cities. In towns too small to support a store they have agents or send salesmen with stock to cover the trade periodically. For example, they sell jewelry at the mines on pay day and in general cover the whole market thoroughly. Of the other most important retail jewelers five are of Italian origin, three German, one Spanish, and one Chilean.

Source: Jewelry and Silverware in Chile, Bolivia, and Peru - United States. Dept. of Commerce, Samuel W. Rosenthal - 1919


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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 14, 2014 6:39 am

TEOFILO DARTIGUES

Florida 23, (late of Plaza Victoria), Buenos Aires


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Teofilo Dartigues - Buenos Aires - c.1910

Established in 1806.

Representative to Ulysse Nardin.

Chronometer maker to the Argentine Admiralty.

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 19, 2014 1:42 pm

A listing of Chilean Jewellers from 1907:

Belser, Alfonso S. Pablo 1885, Santiago
Brosse, Julio Huerfanos 927, Santiago
Cohn y Schwager, Leopoldo,
Ahumada 315, Santiago
Diek, Jorge Ahumada 58, Santiago
Emanuel, Victor Huerfanos 917, Santiago
Furst y Cia, P. F Concha 950, Santiago
Garayalde, Jose Ahumada 134, Santiago
Gauret, Alfonso Ahumada 336, Santiago
Ghiringhelli e hijo, A., P. Edwards 2742, Santiago
Godart, Alfonso Ahumada 259, Santiago
Grez, Manuel E Ahumada 272, Santiago
Grosjean, Eduardo Delicias 121, Santiago
Huber, Jose. .Portal F. Concha 992, Santiago
Jacob, Ernesto Ahumada 281, Santiago
Jacobs, Isaac Huerfanos 913, Santiago
Lamas, Teodoro Estado 180, Santiago
Linenweber, Federico, Ahumada 333, Santiago
Michel, Hno y Cia, Jose, Ahumada 46, Santiago
Miiller, Federico Ahumada 54, Santiago
Miiller, Jorge Ahumada 390, Santiago
Perrenoud, Eduardo..Ahumada 258, Santiago
Schalzt, Fernando. .Agustinas 1035, Santiago
Sinn, Luis E Huerfanos 969, Santiago
Umlauff Hnos Estado 378, Santiago
Maak, Otto San Antonio 142, Santiago
Weil y Becker Estado 354, Santiago
Ansaldo, Juan Condell 113, Valparaiso
Babst, Guillermo Latorre 2C, Valparaiso
Becker y Cia Prat 1, Valparaiso
Cahen Hnos Esmeralda 92, Valparaiso
Dieterle, Gordiano..Esmeraldo 28, Valparaiso
Hepp, Hermann. ..Esmeraldo 40, Valparaiso
Jacobs, R Prat 5, Valparaiso
Klickmann, GuillermcCondell 1, Valparaiso
Lervin, A Condell 135, Valparaiso
Pasos, Alejandro..Buenos Aires 50, Valparaiso
Perrenoud, Jorge Condell 6, Valparaiso
Rolke, Conrado Condell 51, Valparaiso
Schneider, Otto Condell 89, Valparaiso
Schwab y Hnos... .Esmeralda 48, Valparaiso
Lewin, Alejandro... .Condell 135, Valparaiso
Sinn, Luis E Esmeralda 42, Valparaiso
Valoguieso, Francisco-.Urriola 12, Valparaiso
Winvitzoff, Bernardo..Condell 52, Valparaiso
Hamelin, Carlos... .Comercio 61, Concepcion
Messing, Carlos..Comercio 146 A, Concepcion
Meylan, Gustavo..Comercio S/N, Concepcion
Schulze, Carlos... .Comercio 141, Concepcion
Angolo, Felipe Tarapaca
Aravena, Gregorio 20 Tarapaca
Aravena, W. M Tarapaca
Araya, Martin Tarapaca
Bedoya, Antonio Tarapaca
Bert, Cesar G Tarapaca
Bonafade, Juan Tarapaca
Caness1 y Cia, E Tarapaca
Capetillo, Juan Tarapaca
Caranzano y Pazzini Tarapaca
Davila, Angel Tarapaca
Davila, Mariano C Tarapaca
Duran, Manuel Tarapaca
Galdos, Marcial Tarapaca
Gonzalez, Emilio Tarapaca
Guismondi, Jose Tarapaca
Madsen, Jorge Tarapaca
Montague, M Tarapaca
Meroni, Emanuel Tarapaca
Ohlrich, Federico Tarapaca
Pal lares, Francisco Tarapaca
Petersen, J. L Tarapaca
Vallino, Rafael Tarapaca
Villalba, Ramon Tarapaca
Gonzalez, Marcial L Bio-Bio
Garcia, Armando Bio-Bio
Ulmen, Cristian Cautin
Schmidt, Otto Cautin
Fritz, Ernesto 20 Valdivia
Hauber, Otto Valdivia
Henzi, Teodoro Valdivia
Oyarzun, L. Paulino Valdivia
Depolo, Domingo Magallanes
Faller, Adolfo Magallanes
Gall, O Magallanes
Wlodaroswky, F Magallanes

Source: Chile of To-day: Its Commerce, Its Production and Its Resources - Adolfo Ortúzar - 1907

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 19, 2014 3:13 am

JEWELRY IN GUATEMALA

In reply to inquiries from a trade association in Chicago, Consul-General Beaupré writes from Guatemala, February 16, 1899:

During the years of Guatemala's phenomenal prosperity, this was a splendid market for precious stones and jewelry of all kinds. The trade was centered largely in the two cities of Guatemala and Quezaltenango. The enormous profits of the coffee planters created sudden and large wealth, which was lavishly expended in luxuries. This ended, however, some two years ago. since which time the trade has ebbed, until now it is practically nothing. The fall in the price of coffee, the depreciation of silver, and revolutionary troubles created a panic and great depression in business followed. With exchange at 250 per cent, premium on New York and very high customs duties, it is almost useless to attempt to sell jewelry in this country at present. There were magnificent jewelry stores in this city, and some of them remain : but their business is very small. They are endeavoring to sell their old stock and import but little. There are no wholesale dealers, the merchants importing direct.

Most of the jewelry comes from Europe; but, for some reason, the Waltham watch holds the market and is used almost exclusively. This is probably due to the fact that it has been well advertised and pushed, and the peculiarity of this people is that they are averse to change, and prefer to buy that with which they are perfectly familiar.

The duty on each gold or gold-plated watch is 7 pesos, and on each of silver or other material 1 peso. This is in Guatemalan currency, with exchange fixed at 200 per cent, at present. However, a recent decree provides that 30 per cent, of the import duty shall be paid in gold or its equivalent, which adds to the schedule rate given.

Diamonds can be bought here for lest than the cost of importing them. They were brought in during the flush times in large quantities, and the conditions have forced many into the market. A very good white 3-carat stone can be bought for about 500 pesos ($219). and, with exchange at 250 per cent, premium, it could not be deemed profitable to import them. This will hold good in jewelry of all kinds, and, while the present distressingly hard times continue, it will be of little avail to attempt to do any business in this line in Guatemala. Watches can hardly be classed among the luxuries, and it is quite possible that small sales could be made.


Source: The Jewelers Review - 12th April 1899

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 28, 2014 2:57 pm

JOAS FALLETI

Mar de Hespanha, Minas Gerais, Brazil

Joas Falleti, 51 years old, Italian, residing in Mar de Hespanha, (Minas Geraes), jeweler, came to Rio de Janeiro to be treated for chronic congestion of the liver and spleen, the sequelae of an imperfectly cured malarial cachexia. Lodged in a business house on the Rua do Visconde d'Inhauma, he was regularly following a course of treatment which I had prescribed in my consulting room on the 11th April, 1874. On the 19th I was called to see the patient, and found him lying down and not willing to get up, as he had already had three fainting-fits, one of which caused him to fall down and remain senseless for the space of ten minutes; the pulse was frequent, and the temperature of the skin increased; the liver and spleen continued enlarged, and the tongue was coated. The patient arose in my presence to urinate, as I wished to examine the urine, but was at once compelled to lie down, in consequence of the vertigo which seized him. I gave him a castor oil purgative, and after its operation, one gramme of sulphate of quinine. The next day at 11 A. M., I found the patient better; the vertiginous symptoms appeared only when he stood up. I pressed the sulphate of quinine four days more, and Joas Falleti returned to his former condition, continuing the use of the medicine prescribed for the chronic ailments which first led him to consult me. On the 28th June he returned to Minas completely recovered.

Source: A CLINICAL STUDY OF THE FEVERS OF RIO DE JANEIRO - DR. JOAS VICENTE TORRES HOMEM, PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL MEDICINE IN THE COLLEGE OF RIO DE JANEIRO - 1877.

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Fri May 16, 2014 6:08 am

Exploiting "Diamond Mines In British Guiana"

The increase in the production of diamonds in British Guiana and the amount of publicity that has been given to this British colony, as a growing diamond field, has lead to the formation of a large number of companies for the purpose of obtaining diamonds in these new fields, as well as a number of others, which give evidence of having been formed more for the exploitation of the public than for obtaining gems. In connection with the sales propaganda of the stock of the latter companies, it is said that a large number of stories have come out from the colony in connection with the finding of diamonds that is sheer invention, exaggeration and falsehood and this has resulted in considerable indignation in British Guiana because, first, it has brought to the colony many adventurers who have no qualifications for seeking diamonds, and secondly, it will give the colony a bad name among those who invest their money in these diamond companies and get nothing out of it.

In a letter to a prominent diamond importer of New York, a diamond merchant of Georgetown, British Guiana, recently made a protest against both the stories that are being published here in regard to Guiana diamonds and against the formation of some of these companies, saying that they created a wrong impression in connection with the diamond industry of the colony and the possibilities connected therewith. It has also caused "men to come down here who know nothing about diamonds and this in turn causes inflated prices and the absolute impossibility of doing business to show any profit." He, therefore, urged his friends in the diamond trade, for the sake of the colony itself and as a protection to investors, to try and give as much publicity as possible to the real facts in connection with the British Guiana diamonds and the method of mining, as well as the hardships which the seekers after diamonds have to undergo and the absolute uncertainty that follows their work.

Inasmuch as many members of the jewelry trade as well as the public generally have been solicited to buy stock in the companies organized to mine diamonds in British Guiana, we again wish to call attention to the fact that there are properly no diamond mines in the colony in the ordinary sense of the word. In South Africa, the diamonds are found in distinct locations, it being possible to map out the area and the pipe with an assurance that some gems will be unearthed no matter how far down the digging may go. In British Guiana, however, diamonds are not found in place but are found in "pockets" near the surface of the earth whither they have been carried by water or any other waste in prehistoric times. There is no uniformity either in the amount of the diamonds found in these pockets nor is there any regularity in the location of the same. Even though diamonds may be found in a pocket in one place, there is no assurance that they will be found anywhere else within the vicinity. So those who are offered stock in the British Guiana "diamond mines.'' should be careful to ascertain exactly what the claims owned by the company are and the chance of recovering diamonds before investing one dollar. Diamonds, and in fact all diamond mining, is a speculation at the very best. A company may have a genuine diamond mine which produces real gems and at the same time, be in no position to give an assurance that it will ever pay a dividend. As an eminent South African engineer and geologist explained to The Jewelers' Circular many years ago, over a thousand bona fide diamond mines had been located in South Africa, yet as he expressed it at that time, those of the mines that were paying a dividend to stockholders can be counted on the fingers of his two hands.

There seems to be something attractive about a gem mine to the public at large and even to some jewelers and a general idea prevails that a mine that produces gems necessarily must be a paying proposition. But the history of gem mining tells an entirely different story as the stockholders of some of the leading diamond mining companies of the world can testify. It is one thing to have a mine that produces gems but it is something else to have these gems produced in the quality and quantity desired and even then the factor of being able to market the gems after they have been produced at a profit that will pay dividends to stockholders should be considered. All these questions should be carefully considered by the trade and public before they put their money into stocks of diamonds or other gem mining companies that are not already established and known to be paying propositions.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 13th December 1922

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 02, 2014 9:43 am

H. STERN

Rua Viscondi de Pirajá, 490, Rio de Janerio


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Hans Stern was born at Essen, Germany in 1922. His family fled Germany in 1939 and settled in Rio de Janerio, where Hans started work for Cristab, an exporter of minerals and precious stones. In 1945-6 he established business on his own account trading in gemstones, his business grew and he started training men up as jewellers.

His success was phenomenal, in 1992 his business was reckoned to be the fourth largest jeweller in the world with its annual dollar volume only bettered by Bucherer, Harry Winston and Tiffanys. In 2003 he owned 160 stores in Brazil and by 2007 he had franchised out another 170 stores in 26 countries around the world.

He married his wife Ruth in 1958 and the couple had four sons, Roberto, Ricardo, Ronaldo and Rafael.

Hans Stern died, aged 85 years, in 2007.

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 10, 2014 1:06 pm

A Listing of Jewellers and Allied Traders at Montevideo in 1914:


Jewellery

Aragunde, A. y J., Calle 18 de Juilo, 628 n/v.
Ayraldi, E. M. y S., Calle Rondeau, 1558.
Ayre, H. C, Calle Solis, 1437.
Bergdalh y del Campo, Calle Rincon, 687.
Blixen y Cia., Calle J. C. Gomez, 1430.
Brivio, Cayetano A., Calle Agraciada, 202 n/v.
Brusoni y Lascano, Calle 18 de Julio, 853.
Buzio, Cesar, Calle Rondeau, 1593.
Carassale, Ricardo, Calle 25 de Mayo, 534.
Carrara, Esleban, Calle Sarandi, 651.
Cazdban, Hipolito, Calle Mercedes, 807.
Corsi, Arturo, Calle Agraciada, 946 n/v.
Cresci, Antonio, Calle 18 de Julio, 869.
De Rosa Nicolas, Calle 18 de Julio. 1311.
Ferraro, J. B., Calle Sarandi, 511.
Gambetta, Domingo, Calle 18 de Julio, 808 n/v
Gravano, Serafin, Calle Sarandi, 644.
Guthmann, Gustavo, Calle Sarandi, 492.
Lamboglia, Juan L., Calle 18 de Julio, 919.
Liserre, Bias, Calle 18 de Julio, 1333.
Lopez, Jose, Calle 18 de JuUo, 282 (Union).
Lohr y Cia., Calle Ciudadela, 1414.
Mazzuco, Domingo, Calle 18 de Julio, 762 n/v.
Moreau, Julio, Calle Convencion, 1378.
Restano, Domingo, Calle 18 de Julio, 943.
Salgueiro y Revello, Calle 25 de Mayo, 537.
Salgueiro, Revello y Cia., Calle 18 de Julio, 845.
Sellanes y Cia., E., Calle Sarandi, 689.
Spangenberg y Frecero, Calle 25 de Mayo, 561.
Vilizio, Augustin, Calle Uruguay, 1033.
Viuda de Enrique Santos, Calle 18 de Julio, 556 n/v.
Weil y Cia., G., Calle Rincon, 631.
Wild, Augusto, Calle 25 de Mayo, 681 (proprietor Amethept Mine).
Zerbino, Jose, Calle Sarandi, 668.


Clocks and Watches

Airaldi, E. M. & S., Calle Rondeau, 1558.
Amorelli y Hno., Daniel, Calle 18 de Julio, 1089.
Aragunde, A. y J., Calle 18 de Julio, 628 n/v.
Bauer, Carlos, Calle Uruguay, 895.
Bergdalh y del Campo, Calle Rincon, 687.
Blixen y Cia., Calle J. C. Gomez, 1430.
Boccia y Cia., Eugenio, Calle 18 de Julio, 90 n/v.
Brusoni y Lascano, Calle 18 de Julio, 853.
Carassale, Ricardo, Calle 25 de Mayo, 534.
Carrara, Esteban, Calle Sarandi, 651.
Cazdban, Hipolito, Calle Mercedes, 807.
Ferraro, J. B., Calle Sarandi, 511.
Garayalde, Jose, Calle Ituzaingo, 1433.
Guthmann, Gustavo, Calle Sarandi, 492.
Lohr y Cia., Calle Ciudadela, 1414.
Moreau, Julio, Calle Convenci6n, 1378.
Pazos, Jose, Calle Ituzaingo, 1402.
Restano, Domingo, Calle 18 de Julio, 943.
Revello y Maglio, Calle 25 de Mayo, 515.
Salgueiro y Aevello, Calle 25 de Mayo, 537.
Spangenberg y Frecero, Calle 25 de Mayo, 563.
Weil y Cia., Calle Rincon, 631.
Zerbino, Jose, Calle Sarandi, 668.

Source: Trade Directory of South America - For the Promotion of American Export Trade - Department of Commerce - 1914

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 14, 2014 8:50 am

A Listing of Jewellers and Allied Traders at Asuncion, Paraguay in 1914:

Alonzo, Ciuillermo, Palma and Alberdi.
Canals, Jose, Palma, 176.
Carron, Hipolito, Presidente Carnot, 163.
Lopez, Alejandro, Palma, 195.
Ocampo, Indalecio, Palma, 207.
Pompa & Cia., Villa Rica and 25 de Diciembre.
Zinnert, Otto, Palma and 25 de Noviembre

Source: Trade Directory of South America - For the Promotion of American Export Trade - Department of Commerce - 1914

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 29, 2014 7:16 am

Trade Methods in South America


Trade Methods In South America

Washington, D.C, June 19.–The Venezuelan Herald, of Caracas, in its edition of May 22, 1897, quotes from the South American Journal an article written by an Englishman, in regard to the means of improving commercial relations with South America. An extract from the article is as follows:

There has been a grout deal of talk about doing away with the middleman between the manufacturer and the consumer, which many "outsiders" seem to think "a consummation devoutly to be wished." When, however, the matter Is studied carefully, It will be seen that the abolition of the merchant Is neither practical nor desirable. The principles laid down by soundest political economists strongly uphold the advantages of division of labor and the concentration of each man's energies upon the work for which he Is best fitted. It Is clear that the qualifications which secure success as a merchant are quite of another order from those required to make a successful manufacturer. But, apart from the abstract principle. It is obvious that the supplying of South American markets cannot be carried on effectively unless some one undertakes to keep stocks of goods on the spot and conforms to the practice as to giving credit. Very few manufacturers have the capital to do this, nor could they give the attention to the business It requires.

In Buenos Ayres, and, I believe, In some other American markets, it has long been the custom for the actual selling of goods to the shopkeepers to be done through brokers, or, as they are more appropriately styled In Spanish, corredores (runners). When I commenced business as an Importing merchant In the Argentine capital, I had the Idea, being young and active, that the services of the brokers were unnecessary, and I tried to do business direct with my customers. I soon discovered my error. If I succeeded in obtaining an order the broker looked for his commission all the same; if he did not get it, then the next orders be secured were not placed with my firm. It was no use fighting with the system–the customers were quite as much against It as the brokers. They may have been dealing with our Importing house for years, and yet have no personal acquaintance with the principals; perhaps a visit from one of them would be regarded as rather a suspicious than a friendly act, the Idea being that the merchant came to spy the land; though he might speak the language and be very affable, the shopkeeper would not be at his ease. On the other hand, the broker was probably his chum and boon companion, whom he was always glad to see.

It is the metier of those who wish to succeed, as brokers to cultivate social relations with their clients. They generally know all the latest gossip, the newest stories, and do not pester a man with dry business when they find him in a festive mood, but will be prepared to spend hours in badinage or at the cafe, without even mentioning "the shop." Many a sale is thus effected by those who know how to deal with Spanish and Italian people In the leisurely fashion In which they like to do their business, where a European traveler would only be snubbed. In the confidence engendered over a friendly glass, a shrewd broker can elicit many a valuable hint as to how a man's business Is going and what he Is thinking of doing. Circulating constantly among the buyers, the brokers have the best opportunities or learning the state and prospects of trade, the amounts of stocks, etc., the proper assortments of goods, and they–not the merchants–have really the command of the market.

My suggestion to British merchants is that they should cultivate more Intimate relations with local brokers, even If they have to employ fewer travelers. The system of sending out travelers appears to be rather overdone, as a proof of which I may cite the instance, mentioned In my last article, of thirteen Manchester travelers being in such a place as Bogota at the same time. The broker Is always on the spot, knows his customers well, just when he ought to call upon them, and how they should be treated.

Of course, there will be difficulties to be overcome in carrying out the idea I have suggested. Capable and reliable brokers are not so numerous as to be readily picked up as agents, and they would have to be paid a retaining salary as well as commission, but I believe that the outlay would be less and the results much better than the cost of travelers. The agents should be visited regularly by a member of the home firm. I am convinced that this Is the proper system to push business, especially with new articles. These always require special efforts on the part of an agent to introduce them, and he has, therefore, a claim to be appointed sole agent after a trade has been established.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 30th June 1897

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 21, 2014 4:37 am

To Investigate Jewelry Markets of South America

National Jewelers' Board of Trade Raising Fund to Supplement Government Appropriations in Order That Proper Agent May Be Employed to Do This Work

Backed by a guarantee fund from the jewelry trade the United States Government has arranged to send an investigator to the South and Central American jewelry markets to report upon the needs of those markets and exactly how they can be filled by the American manufacturer This investigator, a trained man in the jewelry held will not only send back samples, descriptions and illustrations of the various articles in the clock, watch, jewelry, silverware, plated ware, optical and kindred lines that the South Americans are buying to-day, together with the details of the methods of doing business that must be pursued, but will also act as a missionary for the American manufacturers in helping to give to the South Americans information about the American jewelry trade and what it can supply and the reasons why the South American merchants should deal with the manufacturers and jobbers of the United States. The matter was finally settled at a meeting of the Good and Welfare Committee of the National Jewelers Board of Trade, last week, when, after a conference with Perry J. Stevenson of the Department of Foreign Commerce, arrangements were made to obtain from the jewelry trade a fund sufficient to meet the expense of such an investigator that was required, in addition to the appropriation already made by the Government.

The matter was first broached to the jewelers about a year ago when the Department of Commerce decided to send a jewelry investigator to South America. Dr. E. E. Pratt, chief of the Bureau, sent one of his lieutenants to interview the prominent jewelers on the subject and found that the proposition was well received by the leading manufacturers of New York and New England. However, in the negotiations which took place between the Department of Foreign Commerce and the old Good and Welfare Committee of the National Jewelers Board of Trade it developed that the fund appropriated for the purpose was not sufficient to obtain the kind and calibre of man that could do the jewelry trade the most good. As a result of the negotiations between the department and the jewelers it was agreed that the jewelers might put up a sufficient fund to make good the deficiency it the department would endeavor to obtain the best man possible and also that in addition to the jewelry line originally intended to be covered exclusively by the investigation that the investigator would take up clocks, watches, silverware and other kindred lines in our trade.

When the candidates for the position were examined (two examinations being held) it was found that but one man met the requirements but he could not go for the amount appropriated by the Government, and the matter was turned over by the department to the National Jewelers Board of Trade to arrange to make up the difference. The Good and Welfare Committee of the Board agreed to take up the raising of this fund and the matter was approved by the directors, but owing to a mixup in the Department of Commerce and a mistake of one of the employes, the Board was notified that nothing could be done and the matter was held in abeyance until this year.

Some time ago the department took up the proposition again and the matter was referred to a sub committee of the new Good and Welfare Committee of the Board to act upon. Mr. Stevenson was sent on by the department from Washington last week to bring the matter to a head. He held a conference with the Good and Welfare Committee Wednesday at the rooms of the Board at which the situation and the reasons for the delay were explained, and it was urgently requested that the matter be taken up again and settled if the man the department wanted was to be obtained. In view of the action of the Board last year the committee recommended that the matter be immediately taken up and at another meeting on Friday it was decided to tell the department to go ahead, send the investigator and that the additional fund of $5,000 to cover the work of 18 months would be raised. Subscriptions were immediately started and not only the members of the Board but manufacturers and jobbers generally throughout the country are invited to participate in the fund to snow that the jewelry trade was willing to cooperate with the Government in this as in every movement for the benefit of the industry as a whole.

In speaking of this matter last Saturday, Laurance Gardner, secretary of the National Jewelers Board of Trade, said:

"The National Jewelers Board of Trade, through its Good and Welfare Committee, has just completed its plans of co-operating with the Department of Commerce, in sending a representative to South America to investigate the jewelry, silverware, and and kindred markets. A special committee has been appointed to raise the necessary funds to supplement the appropriation of the Government, and S. W. Rosenthal, manager of the Export Novelty Department of the Shiman-Miller Mfg Co., has been appointed by the Government, with the endorsement of the Board of Trade.

"During the past year the Board's Good and Welfare Committee was in close touch with the Department of Commerce, and held many conferences with Government representatives. Some time ago the board of directors approved the report of the Good and Welfare Committee upon the situation, and endorsed the project, together with the candidacy of Mr. Rosenthal, and the committee was given full power to proceed with its campaign of raising the necessary funds in the trade. It was necessary, however, that activities be postponed until after the first of this year. At the meeting of the committee held Wednesday, May 2, the question was again taken up with Perry J. Stevenson, of the Department of Commerce.

"The co-operation of the National Jewelers Board of Trade with the Government is along the lines of similar endeavor taken by other branches of trade in sending representatives to foreign countries in the interests of American industries. The Board of Trade is glad to have this opportunity of not only promoting the business interests of American jewelers, but also showing the Government our patriotic loyalty by working with it. Every concern in our line should interest itself in the undertaking, whether it will be directly affected or not by the objects to be accomplished. We are counting upon the whole-hearted response of the entire trade. The time is most opportune, for the merchants of South America need the merchandise of American jewelers. Figures show that the United States has been supplying less than three per cent, of the jewelry importations to South America. This record is amazing, and something of which we certainly are not proud. Present war conditions give the American manufacturer a better opportunity to get into the South American markets than he has ever had before, and the jewelers who take advantage of these conditions will be able to hold their share of the business after the war.

"The most important thing is to get American merchandise properly introduced in foreign countries by placing the many important informational details in the hands of our people. American merchants cannot compete with those of other countries in a given foreign territory unless they collectively co-operate with Government backing to inform themselves of conditions in that territory. The project is not a new one. England and Germany have been doing it for years. Their Government investigators have proved their value to the various industries of their respective countries. It is incumbent upon the American jeweler to wake up. The more universally his product is consumed the more stable his business will be sure to become.

"Our committee will commence work this week, and the campaign will be waged with dispatch, so that the plans of the Government may be put in operation within a few weeks. Vice-President DeWitt A. Davidson, who is chairman of the committee, is counting upon the financial support of the trade generally. We expect to find no 'slackers."

Mr. Gardner left Monday for Providence to attend a meeting of the Providence directors of the Board where the matter will be placed before them for their co-operation.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 9th May 1917

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 20, 2014 3:13 pm

MISTELI

87, Central Avenue, Panama City


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Misteli - Panama City - 1908


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Misteli - Panama City - 1908


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Misteli - Panama City - 1912

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 22, 2014 6:00 am

LA FAMA

Calle San Martín 240, Buenos Aires



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La Fama - Buenos Aires - 1910

The business of Julio Burredo.

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 24, 2014 6:45 am

J.L. KERR

Colon and Las Cascadas, Panama


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J.L. Kerr - Christobal, Canal Zone - 1908


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J.L. Kerr - Colon and Las Cascadas - 1912

Contract for Watch Inspection

Effective July 1, 1914, the Panama Railroad Company has entered into contract with J. L. Kerr for the inspection of watches of employes of the Panama railroad and The Panama Canal, and the regulation and repair of chronometers and master clocks. An office is to be provided at Balboa, and the inspector or his qualified assistant is to be accessible there daily between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., except that on the 3d, 4th, 5th, 24th, 25th, and 26th of each month, the hours are to be from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. In addition, an inspector is to be accessible in the railroad yards at Panama between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. on the 7th, 8th, and 23d of each month, and in the yards at Colon between the same hours on the 6th, 7th, 24th, and 25th of each month. The watch inspector pays the Panama railroad $1 per annum, and, as compensation for the service, receives free family quarters, with bachelor quarters for his assistant, and hotel, commissary, and hospital privileges for both. Under the former contract for watch inspection, the compensation included, in addition to the above, a salary of $200 per month for the inspector.


Source: The Canal Record - 22nd July 1914

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 28, 2014 4:37 am

MURRAY'S

Florida 501-507, Buenos Aires


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Murray's - Buenos Aires - 1910

Under the Direction of Mr. H. Lyon (F.S.M.C. London), Qualified Specialist in the correction of defective sight.

The only English Opticians in the Argentine.


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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Sep 01, 2014 1:57 pm

PANAMA GEM AND CURIO COLLECTORS

Angelini Building, 495, Central Avenue, Panama City, 54½, Front Street, Colon


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Panama Gem and Curio Collectors - Panama City and Colon - 1912

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 02, 2014 4:17 pm

J.A. CALORIE

284, Central Avenue, Panama City


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J.A. Calorie - Panama City - 1908

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Re: The 20th Century South American Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 07, 2014 7:20 am

H.B. HYATT

Empire, Canal Zone, Panama



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H.B. Hyatt - Canal Zone - 1908

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