The 19th-20th Century South And Central American Trade

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 08, 2015 7:48 am

NICARAGUA


United States Manufacturers Dominate Jewelry Gold and Silver Markets of Nicaragua

Washington, D. C, Oct. 29.–How much the manufacturing jewelers and silversmiths dominate the trade of Nicaragua is shown in the tables contained in a recent report made by the American Consul at Corinto, Andrew J. McConnico, to the Department of Commerce.

According to these figures, of the total manufactures of gold and silver imported in that country in 1917, amounting to $65,405, the imports from the United States amounted to $65,027, leaving but 378 for that of all other countries.

In jewelry, out of a total importation of $14,756, the amount from the United States was $13,329, and from all other countries, $1,427.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 30th October 1918

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 09, 2015 5:50 am

A.E. MARIAN

Belize, British Honduras


A. E. Marian and Mrs. Marian of Belize, British Honduras, well known jewelers, have been in New Orleans recently.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 28th August 1918

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 11, 2015 5:01 am

JOYERIA VASCO

Larcomar, Peru

An example of the work and marks of Joyeria Vasco:

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PERU - 925 - VASCO

Founded in 1953 by Italian immigrants Luis Varese and Gugliermo Scotto.

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 14, 2015 1:16 pm

MAX KROLIK


Max Krolik, wholesale jeweler, Winnipeg, Man., left recently for Central America via New York and Panama, where he has an old-established jewelry business. He expects to return to Winnipeg about the middle of April.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 8th February 1893

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Fri May 22, 2015 3:19 pm

Information Regarding the Jewelry Industry in Guatemala

Washington, D. C, March 18.—In reply to inquiries from a trade association in Chicago, Consul-General Beaupre writes from Guatemala, Feb. 16, 1899:

During the years of Guatemala's phenomenal prosperity, this was a splendid market for precious stones and jewelry of all kinds. The trade was centered largely in the two cities of Guatemala and Quezaltenango. The enormous profits of the coffee planters created sudden and large wealth, which was lavishly expended in luxuries. This ended, however, some two years ago, since which time the trade has ebbed, until now it is practically nothing. The fall in the price of coffee, the depreciation of silver, and revolutionary troubles created a panic, and great depression in business followed. With exchange at 250 per cent, premium on New York and very high customs duties, it is almost useless to attempt to sell jewelry in this country at present. There were magnificent jewelry stores in this city, and some of them remain, but their business is very small. They are endeavoring to sell their old stock and import but little. There are no wholesale dealers, the merchants importing direct.

Most of the jewelry comes from Europe; but, for some reason, the Waltham watch holds the market and is used almost exclusively. This is probably due to the fact that it has been well advertised and pushed, and the peculiarity of this people is that they are averse to change, and prefer to buy that with which they are perfectly familiar.

The duty on each gold or gold-plated watch is seven pesos, and on each of silver or other material one peso. This is in Guatemalan currency, with exchange fixed at 200 per cent, at present. [The United States Director of the Mint, Jan. 1, 1890, estimates the Guatemalan peso at 43.9 cents.] However, a recent decree provides that 30 per cent, of the import duty shall be paid in gold or its equivalent, which adds to the schedule rate given.

Diamonds can be bought here for less than the cost of importing them. They were brought in during the flush times in large quantities, and the conditions have forced many into the market. A very good white three-karat stone can be bought for about 500 pesos ($219), and, with exchange at 250 per cent, premium, it could not be deemed profitable to import them. This will hold good in jewelry of all kinds, and, while the present distressingly hard times continue, it will be of little avail to attempt to do any business in this line in Guatemala. Watches can hardly be classed among the luxuries, and it is quite possible that small sales could be made.

But these hard times will not continue; the causes which led to them are being remedied, and the resources of the country are such that prosperity must come again within a reasonable period. The building of the Northern Railroad, which is in part constructed, and which will connect this capital with Puerto Barrios, on the Gulf of Honduras, but four days' sail from New Orleans, is now practically assured. and will doubtless be completed by United States capital within the next two years. When this is done, American merchants can well expect that this Republic will be a profitable field for business.

There is nowhere in Central America a commercial agency similar to Dun's, and the only way to obtain information as to the responsibility of dealers is by inquiries of individuals or the banks, and this method is quite unsatisfactory. For this reason, much of the business is transacted through commission houses at New York or San Francisco, who send representatives here.

The customs duties on jewelry are as follows:

Gold or platina, any kind of alloy, with pearls or precious stones, net weight, 150 pesos per kilogram (2.2046 pounds).
Silver or gold, silver or steel, any kind of alloy, with pearls or precious stones, net weight, 50 pesos per kilogram.
Gold or platina. any kind of alloy, without pearls or precious stones, net weight, 50 pesos per kilogram.
Silver or gold, silver or steel, without pearls or precious stones, net weight, 10 pesos per kilogram.
Thirty per cent, of the duties are payable in gold or its equivalent, the balance in Guatemalan currency.

The packing must be as light as possible, and yet secure and strong enough to withstand a long, hard journey and not too careful handling. The port of San Jose de Guatemala, whither all goods must be shipped, is an open roadstead, and to drop packages from the steamer into launches when a heavy swell is running, and then hoist them onto the pier, is a severe test upon the packing, and this cannot be too secure. Should the goods be destined for Quezaltenango or any of the interior towns, they experience in addition the vicissitudes of a pack mule journey over precipitous mountain trails, being bumped at intervals against overhanging rocks and trunks of trees. When the Northern Railroad is finished, these difficulties will be lessened, for Puerto Barrios has a harbor, and vessels can come up to the pier and unload.

Among the fine jewelry stores, I mention the following: F. Widmer, 9 Calle Oriente, bajos del Gran Hotel; Carlos Juvet, 6 Ave. Sur y 9 Calle Poniente; German Porcher, "La Perla," 8 Ave. Sur y 9 Calle Poniente; Joyeria "La Maisonnette," Cohn y Dreyfus; Simon Block, "La Esmeralda," 6 Ave. Sur fte. al I.

Prominent banking institutions in this city are: El Banco Americano, EI Banco Agricola-Hipotecario, El Banco Internacional, and El Banco Colombiano.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 22nd March 1899

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Jul 08, 2015 6:00 am

SILVER TABLEWARE TRADE

Venezuela

The proportion of the inhabitants of Venezuela able to buy plated or solid silverware is very small and the importations into the entire country for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1911, amounted to but $1,060 United States currency. This came (principally from England, the United States, and France, and include plated ware of all kinds.

From this it will be seen that a great demand for and increased purchases of silverware are still things of the future. Whether the sale could be increased by advertising or other propaganda methods is problematical. It may be that the use of Silverware for ordinary occasions is still beyond the means of all but a few families, but it is rather because neither the customs of the country nor the dictates of fashion require that these wares be so extensively used. I have been informed that the display of plated ware as well as solid goods even in what are considered the best establishments of the capital city is very limited in extent and variety.

The import duties on silver-plated were are 5 bolivars per kilo, gross weight, to which should be added surtaxes amounting to 56.5 per cent of the duty , making the entire duty $68.46 per 100 pounds. In computing weights for customs purposes all packing is included. There are no preferential duties and nothing would interfere with American manufacturers gettin a larger share of the trade if prices, terms, and the quality and styth of the goods were satisfactory to the buyers.


Source: Daily Consular and Trade Reports, Part 4, Issues 231-307 - Department of Commerce and Labor, Bureau of Manufactures - 1913

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 09, 2015 5:45 am

USE OF SILVERWARE IN CHILE

Replying to a Connecticut inquiry about the market for silverware in Chile and the chances of American goods, Consul Alfred A. Winslow, of Valparaiso, states that silverware of all kinds and all grades is in general use in all the more important centers of that country. The demand is on the increase, and there should be a good field for American ware which is well regarded. According to Chilean Government reports the United States furnished no silverware in 1904, and but $240 in 1905 out of a total importation of $10,000, while in 1906 the United States contributed $25 worth out of $8,524 From statements of dealers in silverware and the amount displayed in the store windows it is apparent that 1907 will show a greatly increased sale and that the United States will show a remarkable gain. Nearly all the silverware has heretofore come from England and Germany's portion of which was of American manufacturer sold through the foreign agencies in those countries. The duty on silverware is 35 per cent. on a comparatively low valuation.


Source: Board of Trade Journal (Portland Board of Trade, Maine) - January 1908

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 13, 2015 7:30 am

LAPIDAÇÃO AMERICANA

44, Rua da Alfandega, Rio de Janeiro


Image
Lapidação Americana - Rio de Janeiro - 1922

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 15, 2015 5:56 am

M.L. KRAUSE & Ca.

Rua Gonçalves Dias 63, Rio de Janeiro


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M.L. Krause & Ca. - Rio de Janeiro - 1920

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 10, 2016 5:33 am

VAHD W. TOBIN

Palace Hotel and Gloria Hotel, Rio de Janeiro


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Vahd W. Tobin - Rio de Janeiro - 1922

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 14, 2016 6:28 am

GALERIA ESSLINGER

Rua Barão São Gonçalo 22, Rio de Janeiro


Image
Galeria Esslinger - Rio de Janeiro - 1922

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 15, 2016 5:32 am

A.P. LAWRENCE

Rua I De Marco 65, Rio de Janeiro


Image
A.P. Lawrence - Rio de Janeiro - 1922

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 18, 2016 4:58 am

A. MINA DE OURO

Av. Rio Branco, 137, Rio de Janeiro


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A. Mina de Ouro - Rio de Janeiro - 1922

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 31, 2016 4:17 pm

MOSES & BALAGUER

Avenida Rio Branco 134, Rio de Janeiro


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Moses & Balaguer - Rio de Janeiro - 1922

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 01, 2016 2:30 pm

FPM


Another likely South American maker:

Image

The mark appears to be FPM above 0.925

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Aug 09, 2016 9:30 am

A Peru souvenir box depicting the coat of Arms of Peru on the lid and base:

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PERU 925

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 15, 2016 2:28 pm

REPRESENTING THE GORHAM Co. IN SOUTH AMERICA

W. E. Aughinbaugh and W. M. Kelly have engaged quarters in the Silversmiths’ building, 15 Maiden Lane, and will be in this city until some time in September, when they will go to South America as representatives of the Gorham Co. and some other lines. Mr. Aughinbaugh has been in South America for a number of years, and is thoroughly conversant with trade conditions there. Mr. Kelly has traveled widely in the Orient, representing American firms.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 4th August 1909

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Aug 30, 2016 4:17 am

GRAZIELLA LAFFI

Peru


Graziella Laffi was an Italian-born Peruvian designer and maker of jewellery and holloware. She lived and worked in Lima and passed away in 2009.

Her work is usually marked:

PERU
G.LAFFI
925


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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 04, 2016 6:26 am

ECUADOR

The French Consul General at Quito (Ecuador), writes to the Moniteur that there is a demand for the cheaper classes of jewelry in that country. The trade seems to be in the hands of Germans, who can sell cheaper than the French houses. He recommends Messrs. Albert Breille, and Gelvin et Granadas, at Quito ; and Maulme et Fornot, at Guayaquil, as good houses dealing with jewelry.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - April 1885

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Re: The 20th Century South And Central American Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 28, 2016 7:44 am

MEXICO

The United States makes the best offer to the Mexican trade in rolled gold chains, pins, buttons, etc., but in solid gold articles Germany makes better prices and at the present time has almost the entire trade in this line in Monterey. The same holds true in diamond rings and diamond settings generally. Germany is also doing the greater part of the business in solid silverware.

Source: The Metal Industry - July 1907

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