The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

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The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 28, 2015 3:19 pm

The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

A topic for recording those in the East Anglian trade.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 28, 2015 4:06 pm

ALDRED & SON

56, George Street and 172, King Street, Great Yarmouth


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Aldred & Son - Great Yarmouth - c.1880

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Aldred & Son - Great Yarmouth - 1884

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Aldred & Son - Great Yarmouth - 1908

Established in 1795.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 29, 2015 7:01 am

G. & W.E. ETHERIDGE

10, Market Place, Norwich


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G. & W.E. Etheridge - Norwich - 1842


Charles Seaman and George Etheridge, Goldsmiths of Norwich, noted as bankrupt in 1820. This partnership thought to be the successors to Dunham.

The separate Creditors of Charles Seaman, late of the City of Norwich, Goldsmith, Jeweller and Watch-Maker, who have proved their debts under a Commission of Bankrupt awarded and issued forth in the year 1820, against, him and George Etheridge, (by the name and description of Charles Seaman and George Etheridge, of the City of Norwich, Goldsmiths, Jewellers, and Watch-Makers, and Co-partners in trade), are requested to meet the Assignees of the estates and effects of the said Bankrupts, on the 22d day of October next, at Four o'Clock in the Afternoon, at the Swan Inn, in the Parish of St. Peter of Mancroft, in the City of Norwich, and to assent to or dissent from their accepting one moiety of certain monies bequeathed to Sarah the wife of the said Bankrupt, by the will of her grandfather, and which lately became payable, in full satisfaction of the right and interest of the said Bankrupt in the same money; and on other special affairs.

Source: The London Gazette - 1820


George Etheridge & Co. as from 1821.

G. & W.E. Etheridge until at least 1858.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 29, 2015 8:17 am

ETHERIDGE AND ELLIS

10, Market Place, Norwich


The successors to G. & W.E. Etheridge


At the corner of Davey Place, in the Market-place, and leading to the castle, the visitor to Norwich will surely notice the beautifully furnished shop of the eminent firm of Messrs. Etheridge And Ellis, Gold And Silversmiths, Electro Platers, Jewellers, And Watch-makers, Established 1769.

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This business has been conducted on " progressive " principles, marching well with the times, and always furnished with a stock that may well defy competition. Messrs. Etheridge and Ellis have attained the position they occupy by the care and attention they have bestowed on the production of their articles, the sterling value of the material worked, and the excellent taste displayed in the design and ornamentation of the various objects produced by them. To exercise taste within ordinary limits is a matter within the compass of most men; but when we consider that pure gems must be set with exquisite taste, and with due regard to effect, the difficulty is proportionably increased. A diamond of the finest lustre may be dimmed by injudicious setting; or where enamelling is introduced, the colour may be wrong, or the material itself faulty. The lightness of filagree work in gold or silver, by a badly-selected design, may fail in conveying an idea of its great delicacy. Even in the colouring of gold, it is well to select such stones or gems for setting as will harmonize therewith. In the examination of the contents of the stock of Messrs. Etheridge and Ellis, we found an assemblage of Rings of the most valuable kinds, in which well-set Diamonds of the purest water contrasted with the deep rich hues of the Ruby, Sapphire, Topaz, Emerald, Amethyst, and the Iridescent Opal; Bracelets, the most flexible, and of the most elaborate patterns in bright and coloured gold, set with gems; Cameos, copied from classic subjects in Ancient Art, artistically cut, with most ornate and exquisite settings, converted into Brooches; also Knot Brooches, set with stones, and Pendant Brooches; Necklets, Pearl set, or studded with Garnets; Ear-Rings, with pendants of Aquamarine or Carbuncle; Onyx Sleeve Links, Studs, Collar and Vest Buttons en suite; even Gold Thimbles, set with Rubies and Emeralds, or tastefully Enamelled. The above-named will give an idea of the class of articles in gold constantly in stock.

The several articles enumerated are equally distinguished by careful finish and brilliancy of surface. In many examples is introduced exceedingly good engraving in various styles, as floral, geometric, and very nice designs executed by means of engine-turning. Gold has ever been chosen as the representative of wealth and magnificence. Sacred history tells that, wherever costly offerings were to be made, gold was the metal in which the value of the offering was to be expressed. Gold, "molten, graven, and hammered," was selected for the adornment of the Temple, of the ark of the covenant, and for the vessels in use for sacred purposes, by the Jews of old; Gold is the metal which, in circlet or crown, on kingly or queenly brow, is the distinguishing emblem of royalty; "untold gold" is ever accepted as an assurance of wealth on the part of its possessor; "Good as gold" expresses ideas of moral excellence; Gold adds to the charms of natural beauty when, in the form of chain, brooch, or bracelet, it encircles the neck, rests on the bosom, or embraces the gracefully-rounded wrist or arm of the fair; Gold, in cups and salvers, and in the thousand forms which genius and art can give to it, ever indicates the idea that the possessor is one of the favoured few. Bootless would it be to enumerate the varied uses to which gold has been applied, from the simple hoop of gold, indicative of the estate of "holy matrimony," through the whole circle of golden things which embraces within its limits jewellery, bijouterie, and articles of vertu, down to the auriferous leg of "Miss Kielmansegg "—

"All sterling metal—not half and half;
The goldsmith's mark was stamped on the calf;
'Twas pure as from Mexican barter.
And to make it more costly, just over the knee,
Where another ligature used to be,
Was a circle of jewels, worth shillings to see—
A new-fangled Badge of the Garter!"

Valuable, however, as gold is intrinsically, it has been rendered doubly valuable by the art and genius exercised upon it by the art-workmen of all ages. The jeweller now makes for the million; and though it may be said that the gold-worker's art is not now a craft but a manufacture, let us not regret, but rather rejoice in this, and all the more, that with us a taste for a better class of jewellery is rapidly being developed, until it may be said with truth that the producer who has succeeded most completely in realizing the production of articles of a better class and taste is now the most successful in commanding a market.

But the attention of this firm is not entirely confined to the production of articles in Gold. In a peculiar class of Silver goods they are very successful: they produce the most presentable of little cases for "little people," containing each a spoon, fork, knife, and cup, nicely engraved; Communion Services, Card-cases and Tablets, Snuff-boxes, Dram Bottles, Inkstands, Cigar-cases, Muffineers, Toast-racks, Fish and Cake Knives, Napkin Rings, Corals and Bells, Grape Scissors, Sugar Tongs, Ornamental Labels for Spirit and Wine Decanters, Salts, Mustard Dishes, &c.

Their stock is also well replete with every novelty in Silver Electro-plate, and they hold the sole agency for Norwich of Elkington, Polson, and Co.'s manufactures. To the jobbing departments, either of the most delicate watchwork or jewellery, they have paid particular attention, and by keeping the best, and first-class workmen, are enabled to execute all repairs with cheapness, and dispatch.


Source: The Official Illustrated Guide to the Great Eastern Railway - George Measom - 1865


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Etheridge & Ellis - Norwich - 1868

The business of George Etheridge and William Ellis.

The claimed date of establishment, 1769, likely relates to the firm of Dunham.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 30, 2015 5:10 am

DUNHAM & YALLOP

Gentleman's Walk and Market Place, Norwich


Thought to have succeeded the business of the Silversmith Isaac Marsh.


13th August 1811 - At the Norwich Assizes, before Mr. Justice Heath, William Charles Walker, aged 26, was sentenced to death for a burglary at the shop of Messrs. Dunham and Yallop, silversmiths, the Market Place.

Source: Norfolk Annals 1801-1850 - Charles Mackie - 1901



YALLOP, SIR JOHN HARRISON

Died 1835. Aged 72 years

He lived in Chapel Field, in the house afterwards long occupied by Mr. Pilgrim (Coroner for one division of Norfolk), and was a partner in the firm of Dunham and Yallop, silversmiths, of the Gentleman's Walk.

Sheriff of Norwich 1805. Mayor in 1815 and 1831, in which latter year he received the honour of knighthood, and also gave a grand dinner in St. Andrew's Hall.

Buried in the Bolingbroke Vault in St. Peter's Mancroft Churchyard, on the tomb covering which is this inscription to his memory :—
In the vault beneath are interred the Remains of Sir John Harrison Yallop, Knt., who died at Brighton, on the 14th June, 1835, aged 72 years.

In St. Peter's Church is a mural monument, with his crest and the following inscription :—

To the Memory of
Sir JOHN HARRISON YALLOP,

A native and Magistrate of this City, who died at Brighton, on the 14th day of Juue 1835 in the 73rd Year of his Age, and -whose remains are interred in the family vault near to the spot where this stone is erected.
He was a person of few pretensions and many merits, In his nature and disposition unaffected and kind, as a Magistrate upright and just.
He served the office of Sheriff in the year 1805, in 1809 was elected an Alderman, and was twice called to the office of Mayor in 1815, and 1831.
In the latter of these years with a felicity of fortune which his devotion to liberal principles of Government entirely deserved, he received the honour of Knighthood on presenting to the King the petition of his native City in favour of Parliamentary Reform.


Source: Some Account of the Parish of St. Giles, Norwich - Sir Peter Eade - 1906


Dunham & Yallop issued private coinage, Norwich halfpennies, in 1792-93.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 30, 2015 1:42 pm

L. & F. COLE

5 & 6, Market Street, Cambridge


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L. & F. Cole - Cambridge - 1878

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L. & F. Cole - Cambridge - 1882

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L. & F. Cole - Cambridge - 1882

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L. & F. Cole - Cambridge - 1896

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L. & F. Cole - Cambridge - 1903

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 31, 2015 7:50 am

JAMES DAVIS

Fitzroy Street, Cambridge


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James Davis - Cambridge - 1867

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 31, 2015 2:51 pm

W.G. RICE

Crown Street, Diss


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W.G. Rice - Diss - 1879

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 01, 2015 7:27 am

E. HARRIS

10, Orwell Pace, Ipswich


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E. Harris - Ipswich - 1874

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 01, 2015 3:19 pm

NATHANIEL HEDGE I

Colchester

Deaths

Dec. 8. At Colchester, aged 86, Mr. Nathaniel Hedge, formerly a jeweller and watchmaker, of that place.


Source: The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle - 1821


DIED

At Colchester, in his 87th year, Mr. N. Hedge, jeweller.


Source: The Monthly Magazine: Or, British Register - 1st February 1822


Presumably to be identified with Nathaniel Hedge II of Colchester (see below post).

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 02, 2015 7:15 am

A.A. PARSONS

9, Market Street, Harwich


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A.A. Parsons - Harwich - 1865

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 03, 2015 9:35 am

ALLEN & DAWS

45, London Street, later, 5, London Street, later, 122, London Street, Norwich


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Allen & Daws - Norwich - 1895

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Allen & Daws - Norwich - 1910

Recorded under Electro-Platers and Gilders of 45, London Street, Norwich in Kelly's Directory of the Watch & Clock Trades - 1880, and under Silversmiths in The Post Office Directory Of The Counties of Cambridge, Norfolk and Suffolk - 1879.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 03, 2015 3:39 pm

DANIEL BOULTER

35, Row, Great Yarmouth


Died

1st May 1800

At Cambridge, Mrs. Margaret Boulter, wife of Mr. D. Boulter, formerly a silversmith, at Yarmouth.


Source: Monthly Magazine and British Register - 1800


Died

18th April 1800

Aged 70, the wife of Daniel Boulter, formerly a silversmith at Yarmouth, and one of the people called Quakers.


Source: The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle - 1800


(35, Row) In the latter part of the last century this house was occupied by Daniel Boulter. He was a member of the Society of Friends, and kept a shop in which he sold "Birmingham, Wolverhampton, Sheffield, and Pontipool goods in the silversmith, jewellery, cutlery, and toy line," with " stationery wares, haberdashery, gloves, perfumery, and patent medicines." He also dealt in "natural curiosities, antiquities, coins, medals, curious books," and many other articles. During a long and useful life he made an extensive collection of "natural and artificial curiosities," together with some paintings, prints, drawings, and books. The whole he called the "Museum Boulterianum," and published a catalogue of it. He died in 1802, and was interred in the Friends' burial ground. His collections were then dispersed. There is a portrait of him which has been engraved.

Source: The Perlustration of Great Yarmouth - Charles John Palmer - 1872

Daniel Boulter was noted as a member of the Society of Friends (Quakers).

To be continued.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 04, 2015 7:22 am

DANIEL BOULTER (continued)

35, Row, Great Yarmouth


Notes on an Eighteenth Century Museum at Great Yarmouth
“ MUSEUM BOULTERIANUM."

AND ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE MODERN MUSEUM
By Thomas Southwell, F.Z.S.

[Read at the Ipswich Conference, 1908.]

At the Cambridge meeting of the Association in 1891 professor Newton contributed a most interesting and valuable paper entitled “ Notes on some old museums," in which he brought before us much curious information regarding the formation of some of the earliest of these institutions both at home and on the continent, illustrating the subject, as was his wont, by treasures from his wonderful zoological library in the shape of catalogues of their contents and tracing their dispersal or better fate in forming the nuclei of existing public collections, and it has occurred to me that it might be of interest if you will permit me to give some particulars as to an extensive but little known collection of a very miscellaneous character, formed towards the end of the 18th century by one, Daniel Boulter, of Great Yarmouth, and known under the somewhat magniloquent title of Museum Boultcrianum.

I have not been able to learn much about the founder of this museum farther than that he belonged to a highly respectable Norfolk family.

In the Yarmouth museum there is a portrait of Boulter in oils, by one Butcher, on the back of which is the following inscription : “ Daniel Boulter, born at Worstead, Norfolk, 23 or 25 November, 1740. Opened a museum of specimens of natural history, antiquities, &c., &c., for public inspection August 8th, 1778, in the Market Place, Gt. Yarmonth. Died in the same town 9th day of Sept, 1802 and was interred in burial ground belonging to the Society of Friends.” This information I have every reason to believe to be correct, and the date of opening of his museum is confirmed by an advertisement of that event in the Norfolk Chronicle of August 8th, 1778. Boulter kept a shop for the sale of silversmiths’ goods, jewellery, cutlery, toys, haberdashery, perfumery, patent medicines, stationery, &c., in fact his wares were as diverse as the objects in his museum. The shop, which seems to have been independent of the museum, according to his advertisement, was situated at No. 19, Market Place, Great Yarmouth. Palmer, in his Perlustration of Great Yarmouth (1872) states that it was at the SE. corner of Row No. 35, facing the Market Place, and describes it as “ an old house with a modern front,” but says that behind the shop one of the original apartments remains very perfect. It is wainscotted, with a richly-carved wooden chimney-piece, bearing on the friez the date 1640, and the letters ISR or I.S.R, the initials of John Rowe and his wife," . . . he adds: “ during a long and useful life Boulter made an extensive collection of natural and artificial curiosities, which he called Museum Boulterianum. He died (as already stated) in 1802 and was interred in the Friends burial ground.” Although avowedly a dealer in antiquities, Boulter was evidently a connoisseur, somewhat of a naturalist, and had a good knowledge of books. I am told by one of his descendants that at his death the collections were not disposed of by auction, as is usually the case, but passed into the hands of various members of the family and are now quite lost sight of. Palmer, in the “ Perlustration” before quoted, adds in a foot-note as follows : " It is much to be regretted that the opportunity thus offered was not embraced of forming the commencement of a town museum” a regret in which we must all share, but, he adds, “ at that time war, money-making, and social enjoyments were the only things thought of,” and the town had to wait another hundred years before the idea of a public museum was entertained. The reproach, however, of indifference to natural science in Yarmouth was soon to be removed. In 1775 Dawson Turner was born, and a succession of botanists, antiquaries, and naturalist sportsmen followed, who have left their marks upon the history of the neighbourhood.

Through the kindness of one of Boulter’s descendants, Miss Jane Pratt, of Lynn, I have seen a copy of the catalogue of the museum, bearing the following inscription: “This copy of the catalogue was used by my uncle in ordinary, and was always upon his writing table,” (signed)
“ H. Boulter.” There are some MS notes in the catalogue but they are only of additions to the collection subsequent to its printing. Another copy of the catalogue, kindly lent me by Mr. Russell Colman, has inserted in it one of the tickets of admission to the museum, also a circular setting forth its attractions and briefly describing the principal contents of these rooms ; there is no printed date on the title-page of the catalogue, but the year 1793 is inserted in pencil, and from internal evidence this is probably correct. The price charged for the catalogue was one shilling, but the amount was credited to purchasers to the amount of 10s.

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The admission ticket, before referred to, bears in an oval setting, 2½ by 2¼ inches, a representation of the interior of the museum; a lady and gentleman are just entering the room while what appears to be Boulter himself is seen seated at a table, apparently examining some object with a lense, whilst on the table itself are various jars and vases; a stuffed crocodile is on the floor in the foreground, and suspended from the ceiling are an armadillo and a stuffed seal; on a pedestal is a bust, possibly intended for that of Oliver Cromwell, mentioned in the catalogue (page 47, No. I “ with glass eyes ”), various other objects and books are seen on the walls. There is also a so-called book-plate of a pseudo-heraldic character bearing on an oval shield (apparently) argent, acheveron gules, charged with three human skulls proper, supported on a cabinet and surrounded by various curiosities; a large two-handled jar bears the initials D B , and below this is a scroll inscribed “ Dealer in curious books, antiquities and natural prodictions,” whilst on a band looping up a curtain is inscribed “ Boulter’s Museum.”

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The Boulters also issued a well executed token or medal which is thus described : “ On the obverse is represented history, by a figure leaning on a pedestal, on the front of which is a Roman urn in relief; in her left hand a scroll inscribed Boulter’s Exhibition of Natural and Artificial Curiosities. On the fore-ground is a Roman lamp, a vase with coins, Sic. Exergue “Yarmouth." On the reverse, Europe is represented by Britannia, seated on a rock with a book in her lap, in which she is recording the various productions of the globe, represented by their proper emblems. On the fore-ground are shells, &c. Exergue : Undiguague colligilur. Date I796. Edge, “ Published by Joseph, Daniel and John Boulter.” This token or medal, two examples of which are in the Yarmouth museum, together with the ticket and book-plate show Boulter to have been a person of some artistic taste and inventive genius; the medal is figured in Palmer’s continuation of Manship’s History of Great Yarmouth (1856), facing page 98.

The author of the “ Norfolk Tour ” (1795), page 14, says “ there is nothing [in Yarmouth] more worthy of notice than Boulter's museum in the Market Place, who by great industry, with much taste and at considerable expense has collected a curious assortment of English and Foreign birds, shells, &c.” then follows a long list of the various exhibits, including many warlike instruments, fishing tackle, &c., “brought from Otaheiti and other islands in the great South Seas, by the ships who went that voyage under the command of Capt. Cook.”

The catalogue consists of 165 pages and is divided into 66 sections; 5,079 lots are enumerated to most of which sale prices are affixed, but where the objects had been presented to him no prices were quoted, some of the lots, especially coins and medals, consisted of many items. A list of donors to the museum is given at the end amongst whom occur the names of Astley Cooper, (afterwards Sir Astley), surgeon, London; J. D. Downes, of Yarmouth, a noted falconer ; John Ives, F.R.S., Yarmouth, herald and antiquary; Sir Ashton Lever; Edmund Sparshall, sometime secretary to the Norwich museum ; Capt. Turner, of the Hudson Bay company ; Lilley Wigg, of Yarmouth ; John Woodhill, of Birmingham; and others, and I find that Andrew Fountaine of Narford, the possessor of the unrivalled collection of pottery and Palissy ware and Mr. Saml. Tyssen, of Narborough hall were amongst his correspondents. In Nichols’s Literary Anecdotes (18I5) vol. ix., page 684, is printed a letter written by Rev. Geo. Ashby, B.D., dated Barrow, May 14th, 1791, from which the following is an extract: “ I have plenty of books, prints, medals, &c., and a very large room fitted up for the nuunce with fossils, &c., bought of friend Dan Boulter, of Yarmouth, &c.”

Some idea of the diversity of the contents of his museum may be gained by the headings of the 66 divisions of the catalogue to which I have referred, they include mammals, birds, fishes, shells, insects, anatomical preparations, plants, Roman and other antiquities, stained glass, weapon and armour, coins, South Sea weapons. oil paintings, prints, and many printed books, some of which latter we should be very glad to purchase now at the prices affixed.

As an ornithologist, of course, my attention was first given to the section enumerating the birds, and I was much surprised to notice some tropical species which even at the present time one considered rare, but which in the middle of the I8th century must have been excessively so. Perhaps I may be allowed to mention a few: The green hook-billed creeper (Hemigmllhus obscurus of Melin), also the red hook-billed creeper (Vestiuria coccinca of Merram), both from the Sandwich Islands. The blue creeper (Cwreba cwrula) from Cayenne; the red-breasted long-tailed finch (Steganura paradisea) from Angola; blue-billed parrot (Trichoglossus nova: hollandia), New Zealand, and others. The question at once presented itself, how came these rarities from the South Seas into the possession of Boulter at a time when the localities in which they were found were almost unknown ? On turning to page 76 of the catalogue I find a section headed “ Collection from the new discovered islands in the South Seas, by Capt. Cook and others.” I should only weary you by enumerating the 118 objects under this heading, but perhaps I may be allowed to mention three items which will be appreciated by you all and which point strongly to the origin indicated:

No. 6. Beautiful feathered cloak worn by chiefs of Owyhee—£1 1s.

No. 7. Curious helmet of scarlet and yellow feathers from Sandwich Islands—£ 1 1s.

No. 8. Beautiful cloak of same feathers—18s.

There is also in the possession of Mr. A. H. Plowright, of Norwich, a small cabinet, which belonged to Boulter, in which are “ various small specimens of native cloth, some curiously stained,” (No. 116 of the catalogue) attached to which was a label (but not in Boulter’s writing) as follows : " Brought over by Capt. Cook and sold by him to Mr. Boulter of Great Yarmouth." Mrs. Pratt of Lynn, whose great uncle Boulter was, informs me that the latter spent a day on Cook’s ship and purchased many articles, probably of the crew.

It seems, therefore, almost beyond a doubt that many, if not all these South Sea articles were obtained directly or indirectly, as the result of Cook’s voyages, perhaps some of them through Sir Ashton Lever, who was the recipient of many of the spoils and, as above stated, was a contributor to Boulter’s museum.

Those who remember Professor Newton’s paper read at Cambridge, before referred to, will call to mind his mention of the hook-billed red creeper, the type specimen of which, figured by French naturalists from the Leverian specimen now in the Liverpool museum and which he traced from the Leverian museum, through Parkinson and Lord Derby to its final resting place; this specimen " of inestimable value” there is every reason to believe was obtained by Capt. Cook and it is quite possible Boulter’s specimen was the co-type, but under any circumstances the loss of such a rare and interesting bird is immensely to be regretted.

It is evident that the contents of Boulter’s museum passed into the hands of people who cared very little about them and theywere gradually muddled away, leaving no trace of their disappearance. This has been the probable fate of the contents of the majority of these semi-commercial institutions, others were dispersed by the auctioneer, but a few met with a better fate, going to augment our great national museums, those of the Universities or of the municipalities of the districts in which they were formed. Doubtless their chief use was to afford entertainment to the public, but they also served to develop a taste for nature and art at a time when the absence of facilities for locomotion rendered it impossible for the mass to travel far from home, and they were the only means by which the majority of the people could become acquainted with the productions of regions lying beyond the narrow sphere of their existence. As of necessity their contents were of a most miscellaneous character, and they were generally housed in the home of their proprietors.


Source: The Museums Journal - October 1908

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 05, 2015 1:21 pm

R.S. COLE

Cornhill, Ipswich


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R.S. Cole - Schulen and Boby - Ipswich - 1865

Likely to be identified with the Ipswich watchmaker Richard Cole.

The most important feature of this week was the laying of the foundation stone of the new Custom House, at Ipswich...........The first stone of this building was laid on Thursday, 19th Octoher, 1843, by George Jossolyn, Esq., Mayor, assisted by the other corporate officers, and the Ancient Order of Freemasons. S. A.Notcutt, jun., Esq. Town Clerk; George Bullen, Esq. D.P.G.M.; J. M. Clark, architect ; J. A. Pettit, builder.
The silver trowel used was beautifully embossed, the handle being carved from a beam taken from the Old Custom House, and manufactured by Mr. R. S. Cole.


Source: Ipswich Journal - 21st October 1843

The business of R.S. Cole was acquired by Schulen & Boby in 1865.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 18, 2015 8:56 am

W.R. BULLEN

29, London Street, Norwich


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Established in 1887 and still in business today.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 19, 2015 11:22 am

JOHN HARRISON COULDEN (COULDING)

15, Rose Crescent, Cambridge


Entered marks with the London Assay Office.


MCB wrote:

His christening record at Christ Church, Spitalfields in 1807 shows his name as John Harrison Coulding, the son of Samuel, a gent from Booth Street and his wife Susan.

He signed indentures in 1821 as John Harrison Coulden to be the apprentice of William Eady (Grimwade p.383) of the Goldsmiths Company and jeweller of West Street, West Smithfield. He was made free in 1829.

He entered a mark at Goldsmiths Hall in 1831 from 15 Rose Crescent, Cambridge, marks in partnership with John Hodkinson in 1833 and 1835 from 1 Wine Office Court, Fleet Street. Hodkinson was another of William Eady's apprentices made free in 1832. Another mark was entered alone in 1837 from 7 Gough Square, Fleet Street. All marks were entered as gold workers.

In 1838 at West Hackney parish church as a bachelor and jeweller from London Fields he married Elizabeth Wilson of Bishopsgate, daughter of a licensed victualler. His marriage certificate also shows him as John Harrison Coulden.

7 Gough Square remained his address as recorded in an 1839 trade directory and the christening records for their sons John and George at St Dunstan in the West in 1840 and 1841 respectively.

The 1841 UK Census recorded the family at Windmill Street, Milton, Gravesend where he again reported he was a jeweller.

Christening records at St James, Clerkenwell from 1844-46 for three more of their children show their address as 12 Smith Street, Northampton Square where their father continued as a jeweller.

In 1844 John Booker signed indentures to be his apprentice at 12 Smith Street.

The 1851 UK Census record of the family has proved elusive.

Christening records at St James, Muswell Hill in 1860 for two more of their children show their address as Fortis Green and their father still a jeweller.

The 1861 UK Census record for the family has also proved elusive. The probable cause is the transcription to websites of the unusual name.

John Coulden entered a mark at Goldsmiths Hall in 1869 from 116 St John Street, Clerkenwell. The mark was withdrawn but not sent to be defaced until 1892 which suggests it may have related to his son John Coulden.

The 1871 UK Census shows him as a widower and retired jeweller living at Harwell Park, Fortis Green with several of his children.
He was still there in 1881. So were most of his children.

His death in 1884 was registered in Edmonton.

His Will was proved for probate in the same year at the Principal Registry. His last address remained the same as before. Two of his executors were named as his sons John and George, working jewellers of 116 St John Street, Clerkenwell. The value of his estate was declared as £9896 14 shillings and three pence (approximately?).

Further reading, if still required, can be found in Volume I page 99 of The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths Jewellers & Allied Traders 1838-1914 by John Culme.


Source: viewtopic.php?f=74&t=30666&p=76286&hilit=coulden#p76286

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 29, 2015 1:44 pm

GEORGE HENRY DIPPLE

Swan Lane, Norwich


George Henry Dipple established his business at Woodford, Essex in 1878. Between 1888 and 1890 he relocated to Ipswich, and removed again around 1894 to Swan Lane, Norwich. The business continues today at the same location and is now styled 'Dipples'.

Trev.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 29, 2015 2:01 pm

W. YALLOP Jnr.

Haymarket, Norwich


Partnership Dissolved

The Partnership being dissolved by mutual Consent between W. Yallop, jun. and N. Bolingbroke,

W. Yallop takes this Opportunity of returning his sincere Thanks for Favours already received and acquaints his Friends, and the Public, he continues in the old Shop, next the Star in the Haymarket, where those who please to make Trial may depend on his exerting his utmost Endeavours to merit their Approbation and future Favours.

Jewellery, Plate and Plated Goods repaired in the neatest Manner; Lances, Swords, Razors, Scissors, carefully ground and polished; Cutlery, Haberdashery, etc as usual.

Such as have any Demands on the late Partnership are requested to send in their Accounts; and it will be esteemed a particular Favour of those who stand indebted if they will take the first Opportunity of settling with W. Yallop, or his late Partner.


Source: Norfolk Chronicle - 6th April 1782

Trev.

dognose
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Re: The English Provincial Trade - East Anglia

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 29, 2015 2:06 pm

NATHANIEL BOLINGBROKE

Market Place, Norwich


Nathaniel Bolingbroke

Working Jeweller, Silversmith, Engraver, Sword Cutler, and Grinder, Begs Leave to inform his Friends, and the Public in general, that he is removed from his former Shop, in the Haymarket, to that late Mr. Hunter's, opposite the Hall in the Market-place, Norwich.

Prompted by Gratitude, he gladly embraces this Opportunity of returning his sincere Thanks and Acknowledgments for the Favours he as hitherto experienced, and by Perseverance in endeavouring to please, he flatters himself he shall merit their future Countenance and Support. Those Ladies and Gentlemen who shall please to honour him with their Commands, may depend upon their being executed with Neatness and Dispatch. He has also laid in a neat and fresh Assortment of Cutlery, Haberdashery, and Hardware; likewise a Parcel of Irish Cloths, Checks for Aprons, Sheetings, etc which he is determined to sell on the very lowest Terms.

N.B. Give the best Price for white Rags, Horse Hair, Beasts, Rams and Bucks Horns, Bones, etc.

Note. Genteel Apartments to lett furnished and unfurnished.


Source: Norfolk Chronicle - 6th April 1782

Trev.


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