The Baltimore Silver Trade

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The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 29, 2018 5:21 am

THE BALTIMORE SILVER TRADE

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A topic for adding details regarding the silver trade in the city of Baltimore. If you have any details of the assay office, the workers in precious metals, advertisements, examples of their work, markings, etc., anything that you are willing to share, then here's the place to post it.


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Baltimore hallmark - 1824 - Maker's mark: Samuel Kirk

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 29, 2018 5:34 am

BALTIMORE SILVER BUCKLE Co.

800, North Gay Street, Baltimore


The Baltimore Silver Buckle Co are starting in the manufacture of buckles, pins and novelties at 800 North Gay Street, Baltimore, Md.

Source: The Brass World and Platers' Guide - August 1909


The Baltimore Sterling Silver Buckle Company moved from 22 St. Paul street to 593 North Gay street and is now conducted by Joseph P. Auselowitz. The manufacturing business has largely increased.

Source: The Metal Industry - April 1914

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 30, 2018 6:08 am

ANDREW E. WARNER

10, North Gay Street, Baltimore


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A.E. Warner - Baltimore - 1853


An example of the work and marks of Andrew Ellicott Warner:

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Baltimore hallmark - 1818 - Maker's mark: A·E·WARNER

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 31, 2018 9:17 am

JACOBI & JENKINS

216, North Charles Street, Baltimore



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Jacobi & Jenkins - Baltimore - 1897

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Jacobi & Jenkins - Baltimore - 1903

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Jacobi & Jenkins - Baltimore - 1904

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Jacobi & Jenkins - Baltimore - 1906

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Jacobi & Jenkins - Baltimore - 1906



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The monstrance herewith illustrated was given by a Maryland lady as an Easter offering to one of the Catholic in stitutions in Maryland. It was made by Jacobi & Jenkins, of Baltimore. Its value, not including the cost of the diamonds, rubies and sapphires with which it is studded, is $1,000. It stands 20 inches from base to the cross on the top and is made of solid silver gold plated. The base is engraved richly, while the column which connects it with the ornamental top is carved handsomely. Half way up the column is a knob, around the center of which is a circle consisting of six diamonds, six rubies and six sapphires of one karat each. At the top of the column is a bracket surmounted by a triangle of 19 half-karat diamonds.The front plates are models or repousse work. On them is a handsome display of diamonds, rubies and smoked topaz. Directly above the center of the front plate is a dove of pure silver. On the right of the front plate is a vine, containing four bunches of grapes, each bunch represented by eighteen rubies, while on the left are represented three wheat heads, each containing fifteen smoked topaz. The whole is surmounted by a cross, on which is mounted a large ruby. The effect is gorgeous.

A monstrance is a glass faced shrine, in which the Host is presented for the adoration of Catholics, either while being carried in procession or exposed on the altar. Jacobi & Jenkins are at work on the monstrance and chalices which are to be used in the new St. Patrick's Church, Baltimore.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 11th May 1898



DEMANDS OF SILVERSMITHS

A strike of the silversmiths in New York and other Eastern cities took place in November, and after this had been going on for about three weeks, on November 15, the employees of Messrs. Jacobi & Jenkins and the Baltimore Sterling Silver Company, presented requests for a working week of 54 hours instead of 59. Both firms granted the demand, and there was no strike. The men Were affiliated with the National Brotherhood of Silversmiths.


Source: Eleventh Annual Report of the Bureau of Statistics and Information of Maryland-1902 - 1903


The business of August Jacobi, W.F. Jacobi, W. Armour and Talbot Winchester Jenkins.

Established in 1894. Successors to Jacobi & Co.

Succeeded by Jenkins & Jenkins in 1908.

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 01, 2018 5:53 am

G.H. GLENN Co. - GUARANTEE SILVER PLATE Co.

307, North Charles Street, Baltimore



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G.H. Glenn Co. - Baltimore - 1913

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 02, 2018 11:29 am

CHARLES W. HAMILL & Co.

Corner of German and Calvert streets, Baltimore


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Chas. W. Hamill & Co. - Baltimore - 1881

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Charles W. Hamill & Co. - Baltimore - 1881


The business of Charles W. Hamill (b.1845) and James H. F. Hiser.


Charles W. Hamill & Co., Manufacturers of Silver-plated Ware, Corner of German and Calvert Streets.—In these days of wide-awake and pushing enterprise in which “industries of magnitude” are the symbols of the nation’s wealth and greatness, it is proper to give due notice and proper space to all such firms as come under that head. Among the most prominent of these, and one deserving of especial mention, is that of Charles W. Hamill & Co., whose extensive establishment is situated at the junction of Calvert and German streets. We have said that this firm is deserving of special mention. The question naturally arises, Why? The following brief review of the firm's existence will give an idea of the trials and troubles experienced before they arrived at that goal of success which they now enjoy. One of the firm was interested in an active business, and by reason of a partnership difficulty the business was closed through the aid of the court. At the receiver's sale he purchased the engine, tools and machinery of the late firm, having given up to the receivers all he had. They borrowed a small sum of money and gave a bill of sale upon the machinery for security, which amount they soon spent in moving and setting up the machinery in another locality, where they started, January, 1879, to manufacture for the local trade, employing fifteen hands. With a bill of sale upon them, the cloud of the previous business not settled, no commercial rating, and no bank facilities, they commenced their struggle for existence. Their stock accumulating, they were oftentimes compelled to sacrifice it at auction, paying exorbitant rates of interest for short loans, and at other times taking orders at cost, and even below cost, to keep their hands employed. After thus struggling for two years they concluded that the only remedy was to sell their wares direct to the consumer. But how were they to do so? They owed six months’ rent and had no money to spend for fitting up another place. Possessed of pluck, energy and a determination to succeed, they did more and fitted up their present location, southeast corner of Calvert and German streets, costing them $3,000 to do so. By extensive and judicious advertising, they have more than tripled their business, employing 30 hands constantly, who work fourteen hours a day, making over five months of overtime a year, and their wages ranging from $10 to $28 per week. The firm had a magnificent display at the Atlanta Exposition in 1881, and were awarded the highest prize and gold medal. This will be fully appreciated when we state that six of the oldest and largest manufacturers of silver-plated ware in the world competed for this honor. Baltimore can justly appreciate, and well be proud of this award won by one of her most enterprising and worthy business firms most eligibly located in the heart of the wholesale trade of the Monumental City. Their salesroom on the first floor is stocked with a splendid assortment of silverplated ware of every variety and design, from which customers will find no difficulty in selecting anything they may require. By the exercise of great commercial integrity and financial ability, combined with a straightforward system of honorable dealing, the firm of Charles W. Hamill & Co. has achieved a prominence accorded only to those whose operations have been based on the strictest principles of mercantile honor. Mr. James H. F. Hiser, the other member of the firm, with their polite assistants in the salesroom, have all that they can do to attend to the wants of their customers. The firm are deserving of all their success. It is their ambition to make their firm-name and silver-plated ware synonymous terms. With such a laudable ambition they are bound to go ahead, and the time is not far distant when their reputation will be as well known in this community as Tiffany’s is in New York.

Source: Industries of Maryland: A Descriptive Review of the Manufacturing and Mercantile Industries of the City of Baltimore - 1882

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 03, 2018 5:37 am

CANFIELD, BRO & Co.

The Sign of the Golden Eagle, 229, West Baltimore Street, Baltimore


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Canfield, Bro. & Co. - Baltimore - 1853

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Canfield, Brother & Co. - Baltimore - 1854

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Canfield, Brother & Co. - Baltimore - 1854

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Canfield, Brother & Co. - Baltimore - 1856

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Canfield, Brother & Co. - Baltimore - 1856

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Canfield, Brother & Co. - Baltimore - 1858

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Canfield, Brother & Co. - Baltimore - 1860

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Canfield, Brother & Co. - Baltimore - 1864

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Canfield, Bro. & Co. - Baltimore - 1869

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Canfield, Bro. & Co. - Baltimore - 1874

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Canfield, Bro. & Co. - Baltimore - 1876

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Canfield, Bro. & Co. - Baltimore - 1876


Baltimore—Wholesale Watches And Jewelers.—Baltimore since 1833 has been celebrated for this branch of the wholesale trade. It was during that year that the Messrs. Canfield, Bro. & Co., No. 229 Baltimore street, established their firm. Since that time they have been engaged almost exclusively in the Southern and Western trade. They import extensively of watches, diamonds, pearls and other precious stones; jewelry, fancy goods, bronzes, clocks—and manufacturers of silver-ware and jewelry. We believe their stock of goods are unequalled in the United States. One of the partners residing in Europe gives them advantages over most other houses engaged in the same business. Their reputation for manufacturing elegant silver-ware is well known throughout the country. We understand that the sales of watches alone in this establishment exceeds $175,000 per annum.

Source: Cotton Plant - 1856

Established in 1833.

The business of Ira C. Canfield, William B. Canfield, and Joseph H. Meredith.

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 04, 2018 4:29 am

VAN TROMP & SILVER - VAN TROMP & Co. - VAN TROMP & DESPEAUX

Wine Street, later, 22, Water Street, later, 28, East Baltimore Street, Baltimore


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Van Tromp & Silver - Baltimore - 1858

John Van Tromp's working period was thought to be 1856 to 1905.

Van Tromp & Silver appear to be a fairly short-lived partnership from around 1858 to 1860.


Death of John Van Tromp

Baltimore, Md., Nov. 27.—John Van Tromp, a watchmaker and well-known character here, died last Friday at the age of 82 years. The deceased was born in Germantown, Pa., and came to Baltimore when a young man. He engaged in the watchmaking business and established his shop at 12 N. Halliday St., in 1857, and had remained there until burned out by the great fire that visited Baltimore’s business center Feb. 7, 1904. He was very well known among the business men of that center, where he had gained a reputation as a competent watchmaker and repairer.

The deceased formed a partnership with Charles Despeaux several years ago, under the firm name of Van Tromp & Despeaux. After the fire they secured a temporary location at 17 Clay St., until the Spring of this year, when they removed to the new location at 28 E. Baltimore St. The funeral services were conducted Sunday from his late residence, 1611 John St. Rev. George W. Dame, of Holy Innocents Protestant Episcopal Church, conducted the services, the burial taking place in Druid Ridge Cemetery. The pallbearers were: Harvey E. Burch, C. C. Isaac and Charles E. Anderson, of Mystic Circle Lodge of Masons, and Thomas S. Clark, Henry C. Finney and William B. Fallon, of Eureka Council, Royal Arcanum.

The deceased was a Mason and a member of the Royal Arcanum. He is survived by his widow and two children.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 29th November 1905

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 05, 2018 7:00 am

EDWARD AKERS

65, South Charles Street, later, 6, Pratt Street, Baltimore



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Edward Akers - Baltimore - 1864


Thought to have been established in 1843.


Albert W. Akers, aged 38 years, died of consumption, Nov. 15, at his home, 2509 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. He was unmarried and was in the jewelry business on Pratt St., near Charles, being successor to his father, Edward Akers, who was in business for 50 years.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 6th December 1899


Edward S. Dawson, one of the pioneer jewelers of Baltimore, and head of the old established firm of Edward Aker's Son, 6 Pratt St., died June 14 at his home, 2447 Maryland Ave., after an illness of several weeks. Mr. Dawson was 72 years old. He was a native of Snow Hill, Md., and had been associated with the Aker's firm for nearly 50 years.

Source: Jeweler's Circular-Keystone - 1937

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 06, 2018 6:07 am

WELSH & BRO.

225, West Baltimore Street, later, 5, East Baltimore Street, Baltimore


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Welsh & Bro. - Baltimore - 1883

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Welsh & Bro. - Baltimore - 1887

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Welsh & Bro. - Baltimore - 1889

Late Canfield, Bro. & Co.

The business of Thomas Welsh and Frank E. Welsh.


Welsh & Bro., Diamonds, Fine Watches and Silver Plated Ware. No. 225 West Baltimore Street.—The house of Welsh & Bro. has, since it was first established, been the leading representative in this line of commercial pursuits in Baltimore, and their elegant establishment is one of the attractions of Baltimore's fashionable thoroughfares. As tasteful jewelers and skilled manufacturers they cannot be excelled. In their stock will be seen the richest artistically wrought jewelry of unique designs, pearls and all other precious stones and jems, solitaire finger rings, diamond crosses, diamond breast pins and ear-rings, cameos in all styles of set-rings; superior American and imported watches; chain goods in design both rich and rare, expressive of all the skill of the jewelers art; articles of silver plated and solid silverware of chaste design in great variety of styles is shown in lavish quantities. Mr. Thomas Welsh, the senior member of the firm, was an attache and a member of the firm of Canfield, Brothers & Co., for a period of thirty years, and during that time made several visits to Europe on behalf of that firm for the purchase of fine jewelry and diamonds; the diamond department of that establishment being under his special supervision. For the beautiful mounting or setting of diamonds, Messrs. Welsh & Bro., have acquired a widespread fame, and in the line of repairing fine work they stand pre-eminently at the head in the city of Baltimore. A great variety of gilt clocks, bronzes and brass goods, Dresden, bisque and other china figures, vases, etc.; Rodgers' cutlery, Swiss razors, opera glasses, spectacles, etc., are found in the newest styles and at the lowest possible prices. Messrs. Welsh & Bro. fully maintain the reputation of the old firm of Canfield, Bros. & Co. for reliable goods and fair dealing, and in all cases the reputation of the house will be the best guarantee that, goods will be as represented, and the finest which art and science can produce.

Source: Industries of Maryland: A Descriptive Review of the Manufacturing and Mercantile Industries of the City of Baltimore - 1882

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 07, 2018 6:24 am

JOSEPH P. WARNER

Patterson Building, North East Corner of Baltimore and Gay streets, Baltimore


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Joseph P. Warner - Baltimore - 1858

Appointed Assayer of Baltimore in 1844, and again in 1851-52.

Son of Thomas and Mary Ann Meigs Warner.

Colonel of the Fourth Maryland Regiment.

Died on the 30th September 1862.

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Wed Apr 11, 2018 5:35 am

A.G. SCHULTZ & Co.

101, North Frederick Street, Baltimore


Examples of the work and marks of A.G. Schultz & Co.:

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Baltimore, Md.—Silverware Factory.—A. G. Schultz & Co., silverware manufacturers, 101 North Frederick street, have purchased lot at Lombard and Hollingsworth streets and will erect four-story brick factory building on the site.

Source: Daily Bulletin of the Manufacturers Record - 17th January 1907


Member 'silverly' wrote:

Some biographical information for A G Schultz from a primary source:

Anders Gustaf Schultz born 29 November 1859 in Falun, Sweden; immigrated to the United Sates in 1881; and naturalized in Newark, New Jersey 20 September 1888.

Source: 1909 U S Passport application; occupation at time of application was silversmith and address 114 E Lombard St, Baltimore, MD



Successors to Schultz, Tschudy & Co.


See: http://www.925-1000.com/americansilver_S2.html

and: http://www.925-1000.com/ax_schultz.html

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 14, 2018 5:21 am

JAMES NINDE

148, Baltimore Street, Baltimore


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James Ninde - Baltimore - 1858


Procession at the opening of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 4th July 1828:

Watch-Makers, Jewellers, Silver-Smiths and Engravers,—At the head of this association was Col. Standish Barry, as principal marshal. He was followed by Col. Peter Little, our representative in Congress, supported by Capt. John Lynch, and Mr. James Ninde. Then followed a banner used in the procession of 1809, borne by Andrew E. Warner. The device was a figure of Time, with this inscription: "I transmit thee to posterity." Below this figure, on the right hand side, was seen a Gold Urn; on the left, one of Silver; in the centre of the whole was seen a Clock; above the figure of Time was this inscription: Carried by Captain Thomas Warner in 1809." The banner was supported by a member from each branch, viz: James C. Ninde, from the Watch-Makers; George Webb, from the Jewellers; John N. Green, from the Silver-Smiths; and William Bannerman, from the Engravers. Next came an Octagonal Pyramid, borne on the shoulders of assistants, in the front of which was placed a splendid clock. Around the base, and on the second tier of the pyramid, were placed superb specimens of richly chased silver-ware, such as tea and coffee-pots, bowls, goblets, Ac., all the production of the Silver-Smiths of Baltimore. On the upper tier were placed rich specimens of jewelry, as chains, seals, and a variety of valuable trinkets, so arranged as to display that branch of American manufacture to the best advantage. The pyramid was surmounted by a large silver urn, richly chased and burnished. This beautiful piece of workmanship weighed about 120 ounces, and we are pleased to say, was also made in Baltimore. The association followed in the following order: Watch-Makers, Jewellers, Silver-Smiths, Engravers. The sub-marshals were William G. Cook, Samuel Kirk, John M. Johannes, John Lynch and J. H. Warfield. The silver-ware was loaned for the occasion by the maker, Mr. Samuel Kirk; and the jewelry by Mr. Wm. G. Cook.

Source: Rambles in the Path of the Steam-Horse - Ele Bown - 1855

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 15, 2018 10:53 am

J. ARTHUR LIMERICK

21, North Liberty Street and 21, Little Sharp Street, later, 960, North Howard Street, Baltimore


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J. Arthur Limerick - Baltimore - 1903

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J. Arthur Limerick - Baltimore - 1906

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J. Arthur Limerick - Baltimore - 1913

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J. Arthur Limerick - Baltimore - 1918


The handsome bronze statue of the late Prof. Alexander Agassiz, naturalist, has been completed at the bronze foundries of the J. Arthur Limerick Co. and is now on public exhibition in Preston Gardens. Pleasant and St. Paul Sts. The statue is considered one of the finest pieces of bronze ever produced in this country, having been executed for Harvard University. The statue was designed by Paul W. Bartlett. It stands six feet high and was cast in metal sent to this city by the management of the Calumet-Hecla copper mines, in which Professor Agassiz was interested years ago.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 1st November 1922

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 19, 2018 11:30 am

STANDISH BARRY

92, Baltimore (Market) Street, Baltimore


An example of the work and mark of Standish Barry:

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A ladle by Standish Barry is in The Metropolitan Museum of Art:

STANDISH BARRY Baltimore, Md.; working 1790.
197 Ladle. Palmette ornament below drop on bowl; bright-cut design on handle. L. 15 3/8 in.
Inscription: TED (script monogram).
Marks: (1) Barry (shaded roman capitals, initial larger), in shaped rectangle (Walpole, 10); (2) No. 92, in rectangle.


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On the 4th of July, 1790, Mr. Standish Barry, a silversmith, issued in Baltimore, a silver token, known as "The Baltimore Town threepence."

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On the obverse side the device is,—A head, facing left, within a plain circle. Legend:—Baltimore Town. July · 4 · 90 ·. Reverse:—Inscription, Three Pence, within a plain circle. Legend: Standish · Barry · entwined in a beaded network. Border and edge, Milled; size, 9; weight, 13 grains.


Source: History of Maryland - John Thomas Scharf - 1879

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Mon Apr 23, 2018 9:30 am

B. LARMOUR & Co.

Light Street, later, 31, East Baltimore Street, later, 195, West Baltimore Street, Baltimore

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Larmour & Co. - Baltimore - 1874

Established in 1856.

Succeeded by Justis & Co. (W.M. Justis).

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Tue May 01, 2018 4:56 am

JAMES CORTLAN - CORTLAN & Co.

6, Harrison Street and 10, Baltimore Street, later, 216 & 218, Baltimore Street, Baltimore


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James Cortlan - Baltimore - 1833

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James Cortlan - Baltimore - 1840

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Cortlan & Co. - Baltimore - 1858

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri May 11, 2018 5:35 am

WOLF KUMMER

79, Thames Street, Baltimore


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Wolf Kummer - Baltimore - 1858

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Fri May 25, 2018 11:32 am

JACOBI & Co. Inc.

17, West Saratoga Street, Baltimore


JACOBI & Co., Inc. - William F. Jacobi, President. Robert L. Cash, Treasurer. Louis R. Falkenstein, Secretary. Manufacturing Silversmiths, 17, W Saratoga

Source: Baltimore City Directory - R.L. Polk & Co. - 1909


The receiver of the bankrupt firm Jacobi & Co., Inc., at 17 West Saratoga street, Baltimore, Md., will on Wednesday, June 22, sell at public auction, commencing at 10 o'clock a. m., all the remaining stock of the above bankrupt, consisting of high grade sterling silverware, etc.; also the entire complete plan for the manufacture of silverware, consisting of Wicks spoon mill and steel rolls; wire mill and interchangeable rolls, flat and cross mill rolls; motors, blowers, No. 3 smelting furnace, 110 steel and iron spoon punches, anvils, chucks, lead and plaster casts, shafting, small tools, benches, Fairbank silver scales, etc.

Source: The Waste Trade Journal - 13th June 1910

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Postby dognose » Sat May 26, 2018 4:33 am

THE POND APPLIED ART STUDIOS

328, North Charles Street, Baltimore


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The Pond Applied Art Studios - Baltimore - 1911

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The Pond Applied Art Studios - Baltimore - 1912

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The Pond Applied Art Studios - Baltimore - 1913

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Pond Applied Art Studio - Baltimore - 1913


Theodore Hanford Pond - Director/Proprietor (Born Beirut, Syria 27th September 1873, died 3rd November 1933)


The Pond Applied Art Studios, makers of hand wrought silver, have moved from 328 North Charles street to Howard and Mulberry streets. Theodore H. Pond, the head of this enterprise, used to teach the art craft work at the Maryland Institute. He also teaches these lines now at his place of business and also makes and teaches jewelry work, copper, brass and other metals.

Source: The Metal Industry - April 1914


The Pond Applied Art Shop, manufacturers of hand made jewelry, silver and brass goods, of Baltimore, Md., have moved their shop to New York City.

Source: The Metal Industry - September 1914

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