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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:15 am
by dognose
JOSEPH P. MERCER

Baltimore


Joseph P. Mercer sued Jenkins and Jenkins, silversmiths, for $20,000, claiming that the latter broke up his business as a silverplater. The Joseph C. Mercer Plating Company took over Mercer’s business before that. The suit was won by Jenkins.

Source: The Metal Industry - April 1914

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Wed Dec 19, 2018 5:51 am
by dognose
KLANK Mfg. Co.

110, West Fayette Street, Baltimore


The Klank Mfg. Co. Make an Assignment

Baltimore, Md., Oct. 29.—The Klank Manufacturing Co., silversmiths and platers, 110 W. Fayette St., have made an assignment for the benefit of creditors to Charles C. Stieff, trustee. The bond was for $20,000. Mr. Stieff on Saturday applied for a receiver for the company, the action being withdrawn Monday. The business of the company has been unprofitable, it is stated, since its incorporation, last January. Its liabilities are said to be $5,000, and the assets, consisting mainly of machinery, are estimated to be more than sufficient to pay creditors dollar for dollar.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 2nd November 1892

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 4:53 am
by dognose
SIMON RUMAN

156, North Gay Street, Baltimore


Daring Hold-up and Robbery of Jeweler of Baltimore, Md.

Baltimore, Sept. 13. — Another sensational robbery has occurred in the downtown jewelry center, this time in daylight also, the victim being Simon Ruman, 156 N. Gay St. Early this morning two men walked into his store and asked to see some watches, and as he proceeded to get a tray from the show case one of the robbers leveled a pistol at his head and demanded that he throw up his hands.

The jeweler was so startled that he failed to comply immediately, whereupon the gun was shoved into his face and the demand repeated. Although traffic on Gay St. was at this time of the day very heavy and there were many people passing to and fro, the jeweler could see no other alternative than to comply, as the hold-up occurred in the rear of the store, where he could not be seen, and he realized the men were desperate. Following the command to throw up his hands he was led back into an anteroom, where he was bound and gagged, and while one member kept close watch on him with the pistol handy the other proceeded to lock the front door and ransack the show cases. Not content with this, they took $25 from his pockets and whatever loose change they could find around the store. In addition rings valued at $200 were taken, and five watches of the cheaper variety, valued in all at $50. Mr. Ruman expects the loss will be found to be considerable when he goes through all his stock.

The first intimation that anything was wrong in the store was when August Grecht, who was standing on the opposite side of Gay St., heard a crash, and, running across the street, peered through the broken door glass and saw Mr. Ruman struggling on the floor, bound lightly to a rocking chair, which he had succeeded in shoving through the glass. He had tried to unlock with his teeth the door which the robbers had locked before they made their escape through the back door, but had only knocked the key to the floor. He directed Mr. Grecht to reach his hand in and find the key, unlock the door and release him. While this was going on others notified the police, and four detectives from headquarters were rushed to the scene and followed up the robbers, who, however, had made good their escape through the back way. They had bound him tightly with towels and strong cord and threatened to return and kill him if he attempted to give an alarm. Mr. Ruman described one of the robbers as being about 28 years old, with smooth face, black hair and weighing about 175 pounds. This man wore a soft blade hat and dark suit. The other was about 25 years old, five feet six inches tall and weighed about 125 pounds. He wore a black derby hat.


Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 15th September 1909

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 11:37 am
by dognose
WILLIAM MORRIS & Co.

Baltimore and Philadelphia


The firm of Wm. Morris & Co., Baltimore and Philadelphia, has been disolved. Wm. Morris continuing in Philadelphia and M. Kohner in Baltimore.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - November 1886

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Fri Apr 19, 2019 6:01 am
by dognose
A.K. ADDISON

23, Clay Street, Baltimore


A. K. Addison, for many years foreman for Jacobi & Jenkins, Baltimore, Md., will soon open an up-to-date polishing and repairing establishment for the trade in that city. It will be the first of its kind in Baltimore. Mr. Addison has secured the building at 23 Clay St., near Charles St., which will be ready for his occupancy by Sept. 1.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 8th August 1906

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Fri May 24, 2019 5:13 am
by dognose
ANDREW E. WARNER

Baltimore


IN THE HANDS OF A TRUSTEE

Baltimore, Aug. 18.—Andrew E. Warner, manufacturer of silverware and jeweler, made an assignment to-day to A. E. Wilcox for the benefit of his creditors. The bond of his trustee is $30,000. The house was established in 1811 by Mr. Warner’s father.


Source: Savannah Morning News - 19th August 1886

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Thu Jun 06, 2019 2:34 am
by dognose
L.W. PRICE

15, North Street, Baltimore


Image
L.W. Price - Baltimore - 1898

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Mon Jun 10, 2019 2:39 am
by dognose
ALEXANDER J. HUBBARD

13, North Street, Baltimore


Image
Alex. J. Hubbard - Baltimore - 1898

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Tue Jun 11, 2019 10:05 am
by dognose
SIMON JANOWITZ

137, West Baltimore and Calvert streets, later, 213, East Baltimore Street, Baltimore


Image
S. Janowitz - Baltimore - 1863

Simon Janowitz was born in Hungary around 1811.

Late Canfield Bro. & Co.

The business was later S. Janowitz & Sons (Simon, Richard and Lewis Janowitz).

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Tue Jun 18, 2019 3:02 am
by dognose
GEARY & WEALE

117, East Baltimore Street, Baltimore


Geary & Weale, 117 E. Baltimore St., Baltimore, Md., have dissolved and the stock has been sold to a New York firm. The building has been condemned and the owners will have it torn down and a fine building erected on the site.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 15th May 1901

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Sun Jul 07, 2019 4:50 am
by dognose
WILLIAM F. BISSING

104, later, 56, West Baltimore Street, Baltimore


William F. Bissing, whose familiar sign has long appeared above 104 W. Baltimore St., now hangs out at 56 W. Baltimore St. Mr. Bissing will carry a larger stock of goods than ever before.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 29th June 1892

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Sat Jul 27, 2019 3:31 am
by dognose
JACOB CASTLEBERG

Baltimore


The sale of the stock and fixtures of Jacob Castleberg, of Baltimore, in the interest of his creditors, made favorable progress up to the last accounts we received from there. The goods were selling at satisfactory prices, and it was believed that they would realize the full amount at which they were appraised by the committee. The committee representing the creditors at the sale were Messrs. S. H. Monell, Wm. A. Copeland and J. B. Bowden, who have been untiring in their efforts in the interest of the creditors.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - March 1887

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:40 am
by dognose
M. BERMAN

876, West Baltimore Street, Baltimore


M. Berman, Harrisburg, Pa., is now established in business at 876 W. Baltimore St.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 26th August 1908

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Sun Aug 18, 2019 7:03 am
by dognose
THE BALTIMORE SOUVENIR SPOON


The Baltimore Souvenir Spoon was issued by Justis & Armiger in 1891:

Image
Justis & Armiger - Baltimore - 1891

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Sun Sep 22, 2019 7:04 am
by dognose
B.D. NUITZ

42, West Lexington Street, Baltimore


B. D. Nuitz, who for five years was with Charles W. Nuitz at 513 N. Eutaw St., has opened a store at 42 W. Lexington St.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review - 28th October 1891

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Re: The Baltimore Silver Trade

Posted: Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:27 am
by dognose
MILTON I. MERVIS

Lexington and Liberty Streets, Baltimore


One of the handsomest jewelry stores opened here for several years has been opened at Lexington and Liberty Sts. by Milton I. Mervis. The location is an ideal one, being in the centre of the retail shopping district. Mr. Mervis is carrying a high grade stock and his window display is one of the most artistic of the scores of jewelry stores in the retail jewelry district.

Source: The Jewelers' Circular - 3rd May 1922

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