The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

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The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 05, 2019 2:55 pm

The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire

A topic for recording those working in the trade in Yorkshire and outside of the cities of Sheffield and York.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 05, 2019 3:12 pm

JULIAN RAYMER

Leeds

Jubal Tankard, described as a dealer in cattle-medicines, was charged at the Leeds Police Court on December 20 with obtaining by means of false pretences a gold watch from Julian Raymer, watchmaker and jeweller. It was stated that defendant called at prosecutor's shop and represented himself as one of the committee of the Bramham Hunt. He stated that he had been authorised to obtain a gold watch, which was to be presented to the chief whip. The prosecutor, upon the strength of those representations, handed defendant the gold watch in question, but as no payment was made as promised he became suspicious, and made inquiries with the result that he discovered the defendant was in no way connected with the testimonial. The defendant was committed for trial.

Source: The Chemist and Druggist - 29th December 1894

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 06, 2019 7:20 am

BARNBY & RUST

15, Market Place, later, 27, Silver Street, Hull


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Barnby and Rust - Hull - 1865

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Barnby & Rust - Hull - 1884

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Barnby & Rust - Hull - 1901


Notice is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned, Charlotte Rust and Henry Rust, carrying on business as Silversmiths and Jewellers, at 15, Market-place, Hull, under the style or firm of Barnby and Rust, has been dissolved, by mutual consent, as and from the 28th day of February. 1894. All debts due to and owing by the said late firm will be received and paid by the said Henry Rust, who will continue the said business alone at the same premises, under the present style or firm of Barnby and Rust.—Dated this 6th day of June, 1894.
CHARLOTTE RUST.
HENRY RUST.


Source: The London Gazette - 8th June 1894


Book Review - Alan Marshall and Gill Roberts - The Barnby & Rust story - watchmakers, jewellers & silversmiths in Hull for over 200 years - The Torch Publishing 2016.

Studies of shops and their proprietors are sadly few so it is an especial pleasure to have this account of one of Hull’s best known retailers of clocks, watches and jewellery. It originates in the eighteenth century with William Rust, when craftsmen, were still making the items sold in their shops. He learned his trade in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, before moving to Lincolnshire where he married. He then settled in the thriving port town of Hull c.1784, and the earliest known watch by him is hallmarked for 1785 and numbered 194. This has survived being cooked inside a safe when the Market Place premises were destroyed by bombing in 1941 and has been given to Hull Museums. His life is documented better than one might have expected because of his close involvement with the Fish Street chapel, of which he became a Deacon and then a Trustee. Rust also invested in the whaling trade by buying shares in a number of local vessels.

John Sutton Shipham, of Lincolnshire, became a partner but in 1842 left to join with his family in the brass founding company, which survives to this day, though not actually casting the brass components themselves any more.

Bishop Barnby, born in Hull, had like Shipham been apprenticed to Rust and like his master was a staunch member of the Fish street chapel, where his wife taught in the Sunday school. Barnby was a member of the Board of Guardians for the Hull Workhouse as well as a founder member of the Hull Mechanics Institute of which he was elected secretary.

Another Rust, Henry of Bishop Stortford, Essex, joined Bishop Barnby in 1856, but there was apparently no family connection whatever with William, and having the same name is entirely coincidental! Barnby died in 1864 and Rust carried on the business in the name of Barnby and Rust. The sudden death of Henry led to his widow making Robert Stevenson, a shop assistant, a junior partner but further tragedy followed when the shop at 15 Market Place, with the living quarters above, were destroyed by fire. While this was rebuilt they occupied 29 Market Place.

Henry Rust Jnr. had died unmarried and his brother Benjamin took over in 1907 though he was a reluctant shopkeeper preferring to be in the workshop. He was succeeded in 1937 by Richard Stark Cochrane who had originally been taken on as a junior assistant by Henry Rust. Born in Glasgow the son of a grocer the family came to Hull because his aunt was married to an engineer in Hull’s Wilson Line.

Sadly the old established Market Place premises were destroyed by bombing in 1941 but just a month later they were reestablished at 27 Silver street, the home of Barnby and Rust till eventual closure. Alan Marshall, an accountant, married Richard Cochrane’s daughter Sybil, became company secretary in 1949 and subsequently a director. After the 1970's small businesses increasingly felt the burden of PAYE, VAT and National
Insurance as well as the competition of the large retail chains. Security and the cost of insurance only added to costs and between 1973-1984 there were four thefts, one smash and grab, a burglary, and on one occasion the staff were threatened by a man wielding a knife. Finally in 1994 the decision to wind up was taken and after a clearance sale the shop closed its doors for the last time 18 March 1995, ending over 200 years of
business.

The book provides an insight into the changing Hull scene, the effects of war and economic ups and downs, and the changing tastes of customers, all of which recommends it to a wide audience. The first half was substantially completed by Alan Marshall before his death and the remainder assembled by his daughter Gill Roberts from his notes, and by reference to the stock books, publicity material, letters and minutes which are all
now deposited in the Hull History Centre.

Arthur G. Credland


Source: East Yorkshire Local History Society Newsletter - Winter/Spring 1917

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 07, 2019 7:22 am

EDWIN S. PEGLER

19, Old Market, Halifax


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Edwin S. Pegler - Halifax - 1857


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E.S. Pegler - Halifax - 1872

Late R. Skirrow.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 08, 2019 2:58 am

MANOAH RHODES

Details of Manoah Rhodes and Manoah Rhodes & Son of Bradford can be found at:

Manoah Rhodes

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 08, 2019 4:15 am

T. BRANTON

44, Carr Lane, Hull


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T. Branton - Hull - 1901

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 09, 2019 10:59 am

C.A. CLOUGH

19, Upperhead Row, Leeds


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C.A. Clough - Leeds - 1868

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 10, 2019 3:19 am

MATTHEW SEMPLE

38, Kirkgate, Bradford


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Matthew Semple - Bradford - 1845

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 11, 2019 5:07 am

THOMAS REYNOLDSON & SON

11, Queen Street, later, 20, Whitefriargate, Hull


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Thomas Reynoldson & Son - Hull - 1885


Recorded on the list of Tradesmen who hold Warrants of Appointment from the Keeper of the Privy Purse with authority to use the Royal Arms. (Such Warrants do not carry the right to fly the Royal Standard). (Source: The London Gazette - 2nd January 1903)

Thomas Reynoldson & Son entered their mark, 'T.R/T.C.R' (Thomas Reynoldson and Thomas Charles Reynoldson) contained within a trefoil punch, with the London Assay Office on the 23rd April 1897.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 12, 2019 6:10 am

FOWLER & OLDFIELD

58, Market Street, later, 30, Kirkgate, Bradford


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Fowler & Oldfield - Bradford - 1915

Fowler & Oldfield were established in 1897, they continued in business until at least 2012.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 13, 2019 5:51 am

BARNETT & SCOTT

45, Whitefriargate, and 62-64, Carr Lane, Hull, and Grimsby


With the view of meeting the demands of business, and with combining the manufacture and sale of every description of work in gold and silver, Mr. B. Barnett has utilised his extensive property at the rear of his premises in Whitefriargate, and built a manufactory. The height and depth of the shop have been greatly increased, and the whole of the frontage will shortly be rebuilt, so as to make the building as elegant and imposing as the shop will be attractive. We may observe that Mr. Barnett intends to add to his present business that of a dealer in antique works of art, china, and articles of vertu, so that the shop, or rather the rear portion of it, will present all the characteristics of an art exhibition. Ranged along the sides of the added portion of the shop will be splendid cases, mirrors, timepieces, exquisite antique cabinets, and pictures. Especial care has been exercised to secure perfect ventilation and lighting. On the ground floor is a spacious warehouse and packing room, whilst on the first floor are large workrooms devoted to burnishing and polishing plate and jewellery. On the second floor are rooms for watch and chronometer makers, and for the execution of general repairs. On the third floor there it a long range of shops devoted to the manufacture of almost every kind of gold and silver jewellery, plating, gilding, frosting, colouring, &c, and special laboratories for rolling, melting, and testing metals. The lathes will be worked by a gas-engine. On the fourth floor, and rising above the general height of the main block of the building, is an observatory filled with transit instruments for taking true observations. The whole building is fitted up with special telephonic and electric communication, and the arrangements are as complete as experience and judgment can suggest. It will thus be seen that the improvement in the premises is of the most extensive character, whilst the introduction of the manufacture of plate and jewellery not only brings a new source of industry to Hull, but secures to purchasers the advantage of being able to have any design carried out on the spot. Few, if any, establishments in the provinces, not excepting Liverpool and Manchester, are more complete than Mr. Barnett's. The alterations and enlargement have been carried out by Mr. B. S. Jacobs, Architect. — Communicated by Mr. H. Bush.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 5th January 1883


Royal Visit To Huddersfield

........On arriving at the principal entrance gate the Duke of Albany was presented with a gold key, manufactured by Messrs. Barnett and Scott, of Hull...............


Source: The Times - 15th October 1883


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Barnett and Scott - Hull - 1888


HULL CORPORATION PLATE

On Jan. 7, at the sale of the effects of the late Mr. Theophilus Carrick, an interesting and exciting competition took place when a small antique silver salver about six inches in diameter, was put up. The arms of Hull are engraved upon it, and its period is that of George I., 1718. It seems that the salver was originally the property of the Hull Corporation before it was reformed, and hence the spirited bidding which took place yesterday. It was sold to Messrs Barnett and Scott, for the great price of 51s per ounce. The salver weighs eight ounces two pennyweights, and the amount it realised was £20 13s. 3d. The companion salver was purchased by Mr. Barnett some years ago, at the sale of the effects of the late William Bolton, Borough Treasurer, and was sold by him to Alderman Leak, who presented it to the Corporation. The salver sold yesterday bears the same hall mark, has the same date, letter, and maker's mark. Messrs Barnett and Scott subsequently sold the salver to a member of the Corporation. The auctioneers were Messrs N. Easton and Son.


Source: Eastern Morning News - 1884


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Barnett and Scott - Hull - 1888


Electric Lighting at Hull

Messrs. Barnett and Scott, jewellers, Whitefriargate, Hull, have had their premises lighted by electricity, and a number of representative men of the town were present, by invitation, to witness the inauguration. Electricity as a means of lighting the public streets of Hull was tried some time ago by the corporation, but afteratime discontinued ; and it has also been used at dock, railway, and one or two large works in the town, but Messrs. Barnett and Scott have been foremost in its introduction to shop premises. A powerful gas engine has been placed in the back premises, and this is the motive power for supplying electricity throughout the establishment. After a test of the lighting had been made, the company present partook of refreshments, and the Mayor proposed the health of Messrs. Barnett and Scott, in responding to which Mr. Barnett said the burning of gas in their show premises and workshops had been found to be injurious to the health of their assistants and workpeople generally, and to have a damaging effect upon their goods ; this had led to their trial of the electric light, which did not give off heat and fumes, as gas did. The plant consists of a 6 H.P. Otto gas engine, which has been laid down by Messrs. Crossley Brothers, Limited, a Ferranti dynamo, and a Siemens exciter. The lamps are the Woodhouse and Rawson incandescent, of 20 candle-power each, and they are arranged suspended from chandeliers on either side of the extensive shop, six lamps forming a cluster. A sun-light of lamps is fixed in the centre of the ceiling, and eight lamps in each compartment of the window. The whole of the lamps in the shop give an illumination stated to be of 2,000 candle-power, producing a most brilliant effect. The offices and workshop will also be fitted with the same light. The installation has been carried out under the direction of Mr. Thomas Muse, electrician, of Hull.


Source: The Telegraphic Journal and Electrical Review - 15th January 1886


Notice is hereby given, that the Partnership which has for some time past been carried on by Barney Barnett and Benjamin Scott, under the style or firm of Barnett and Scott, at No. 45, Whitefriargate, in the borough of Kingston-upon-Hull, as Manufacturing Art Jewellers and Silversmiths, was, on the 19th day of September, 1889, dissolved by mutual consent. As witness our hands.— Dated the 21st day of October, 1889.
B. BARNETT.
B. SCOTT.


Source: The London Gazette - 1st November 1889


Burglary Insurances

The case of Messrs. Barnett and Scott, Hull, before reported by us, has at last been settled. It will be remembered that on Boxing Night, 1890, it was reported to the police that the premises of Messrs. Barnett and Scott, jewelers, had been broken into, and goods to the value of several thousands of pounds stolen. The firm were insured against losses by burglary with the Security Company, Limited, of London, for £3,000, and with the Mercantile Accident and Guarantee Insurance Company, Limited, of Glasgow, for £4,500, and as these companies refused to pay, alleging that no burglary was committed, Messrs. Barnett and Scott commenced an action against each of the insurance companies to recover the amount covered by the policies. Both companies opposed the claims under circumstances previously detailed. The action against the Security Company was eventually settled by Messrs. Barnett and Scott accepting a sum of £450 in settlement of their claim and costs against the company. The action against the Mercantile Insurance Company, however, proceeded, and some time after came before the Court of Appeal, which decided that Messrs. Barnett and Scott were wrong in commencing proceedings against the company without first submitting the claim to arbitration, and dismissed the action with costs. Since then the Court has made an order, by consent of the parties, staying all further proceedings, on the terms that Messrs. Barnett and Scott abandon their claim against the Insurance Company altogether ; whilst the company forego their costs of the action which was dismissed.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st September 1892


Sale at Hull

A firm of accountants are instructed to realise the valuable stock, fixtures, premises, &c, of Mr..B. Scott (trading under the style of Barnett and Scott), art jewelers, Whitefriargate. Hull, in consequence of the proprietor being ordered abroad on account of ill-health.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 2nd January 1893


Messrs Barnett and Scott's Sale

Owing to the ill-health and withdrawal from business of Mr. Scott, the high-class stock of this firm has been sold by public auction. This has created quite a little sensation in Hull.


Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st June 1893


The business was established at Hull in 1830 by Abraham Barnett. It was restyled to Abraham Barnett & Son c.1860 when Abraham's son, Barney joined the firm.

Abraham Barnett retired on the 6th November 1876.

Sometime around 1890 Barney Barnett extended the business to London, operating from premises at 319, High Holborn. Barney Barnett appears to have then managed the London branch, leaving one Thomas Chapman to manage the Hull side of the business.

The business was converted into a limited liability company, styled B. Barnett Ltd., on the 17th June 1898, the directors being recorded as Barney Barnett, Lewis Barnett, Edwin. M. Ellis, and Walter E. Lloyd.

B. Barnett Ltd. had premises at 7, Cranbourn Street, Leicester Square, London.

Barney Barnett died in 1905.

The firm are still in existence today, now based in the Burlington Arcade, Piccadilly, London.

The business used the services of the London and Chester assay offices.

Barney Barnett entered his mark, 'BB', contained within a heraldic shield, with the London Assay Office on the 1st February 1881. A further mark, 'BB', contained within an oblong punch, was entered on the 29th June 1882.

Barney Barnett entered his mark, 'BB', contained within an oblong punch, with the Chester Assay Office on the 18th November 1882. A further mark, 'B.B. HULL', contained within an oblong punch, was entered on the 21st June 1883.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 14, 2019 1:35 pm

LAWRENCE GRAINGE

Union Passage, Bradford


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Lawrence Grainge - Bradford - 1845

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 15, 2019 6:25 am

WILLIAM HUMPHREY

28, Duncan Street, Leeds


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William Humphrey - Leeds - 1868

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 16, 2019 6:35 am

ABRAHAM BRUMFIT

29, Kirkgate, Bradford


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Ab. Brumfit - Bradford - 1845

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Ab. Brumfit - Bradford - 1845

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 19, 2019 6:00 am

WILLIAM BROOKSBANK

6, Market Street, Bradford


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William Brooksbank - Bradford - 1845


OBITUARY

Mr. William Brooksbank.—It is with deep regret that we announce the death of Mr. William Brooksbank, of Bradford, silversmith, which sad event took place in the evening of Friday, 13th March, at his residence in Tyrrel Street. Mr. Brooksbank, who was in the sixty-seventh year of his age, was one of the best-known and most respected gentlemen of Bradford. In early life he was with Mr. Allott, silversmith, Kirkgate, and afterwards started in business in Market Street. He was a kindly, genial man, and, although he never thrust himself prominently forward in the public affairs of the town, always interested himself in any movement that had for its object the furtherance of the town's prosperity. Mr. Brooksbank was a Conservative in politics, and in 1863 he was elected to represent the West Ward in the Bradford Town Council, which office he continued to hold for six years, retiring in 1869. The charities of the town had always Mr. Brooksbank's earnest sympathy, and for some of them he worked with considerable energy and good result. The Bradford and Airedal Floral Society may be said almost to have owed its existence to Mr. Brooksbank. He acted as treasurer for the society from its commencement twenty-five years ago, and it is not too much to say that but for his energetic exertions the society would probably have succumbed ere this. Mr. Brooksbank had a wide circle of friends, by whom his loss will be sincerely deplored. As a tradesman he was upright and honourable, and as a public man he was always assiduous in the discharge of any duties that he undertook.


Source: The Yorkshire Magazine - 15th March 1874

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 21, 2019 5:30 am

MAURICE STONE

Beulah Street, Harrogate


On Sunday night, or early on Monday morning, the shop occupied by Maurice Stone, jeweller, Beulah-street, Harrogate, was entered by burglars, and about £400 worth of gold and silver watches, diamond brooches, and other jewellery stolen. The goods were quite new, the shop having only been open two or three weeks. The burglars got clear off with their booty.

Source: South Wales Daily News - 31st August 1897

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 25, 2019 1:56 pm

FATTORINI & SONS - FATTORINI & SONS Ltd.

21, Kirkgate, and 27, Westgate, Bradford - 14, Regent Parade, Harrogate - Leeds - Bradford Works, Barr Street, Birmingham, and London, Manchester, Glasgow and Cardiff


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Fattorini & Sons - Bradford - 1873


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Fattorini & Sons - Bradford - 1874


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Fattorini & Sons - Bradford - 1882


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Fattorini & Sons - Bradford - 1899


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Fattorini & Sons - Bradford - 1901


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Fattorini & Sons - Bradford - 1902


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Fattorini & Sons Ltd. - Bradford - 1917


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F&S - Birmingham - 1924


During the long winter nights the jewellers' shops have been plundered to a very serious amount. These robberies are supposed to be committed by a few practised ruffians, who, having fixed upon the destined prey, form a deliberate and skilful plan, and watch the place for a good opportunity with unwearied diligence.

Between 10 and 12 o'clock of the morning of Sunday, the 81st of January, the shop of Messrs. Fattorini and Sons, jewellers, Bradford, was entered, and about 1800l. worth of jewellery was stolen therefrom. The proprietors of the establishment were attending mass at the time of the robbery, and thus the premises, which are usually guarded night and day, were left wholly unprotected. Adjoining Messrs. Fattorini's shop, which is situated at Kirkgate, is an empty house, the upper front room of which is divided from tho upper room of Messrs. Fattorini's house by a wooden partition, in which a square hole had been cut by means of a centre-bit and saw, and through which the thief effected his entrance and egress from the jewellers' shop. The property stolen consisted of about 40 gold and 45 silver English lever watches, 40 gold and 35 silver Geneva watches, 150 gold wedding rings, 50 gold hoops, 50 gold chains, 6 gold Albert chains, 5 gold fob chains and topaz seals, 4 gold bracelets, 24 silver guards, 8 silver Albert guards, 3 plated fob chains, and a number of second-hand watches. A large quantity of portable property, such as silver spoons, gold rings, &c., was scattered about on all sides; indeed, the shelves in the windows whence the watches were taken were filled with clusters of valuable rings and jewelry, which were left undisturbed. It is supposed the thief was disturbed in his operations.


Source: The Annual Register 1858 - 1859


Extensive Robbery of Jewellery at Bradford.—Alfred M. Frost, Woodlands Street, a watchmaker, has been arrested at Bradford, charged with committing extensive jewel robberies at Messrs. Fattorini and Sons, Kirkgate. Till about three years ago the prisoner was in the service of this firm, but set up business on his own account. He periodically made visits to Messrs. Fattorini's shop for the purpose of making purchases of articles used in his business as a watchmaker, and frequently bought also goods for which he had customers. On these occasions, from his long connection with the place, he was allowed greater freedom in the handling of goods than is ordinarily permitted to customers, and for some time past several things had been missed coincidently with Frost's visits. The firm, however, were loth to connect him with these thefts, but some seals being missed, the matter was reported to the police. Notices describing the stolen seals were served upon the pawnbrokers, and as Frost was found to offer one of them in pledge he was taken into custody. A search of his house resulted in the discovery of a large number of pawn-tickets, relating to the pledging of jewellery at various places to the amount of £400. Alter his arrest, Frost seemed disposed to make a clean breast of the matter, probably in the hope that this course would lead to his being more leniently dealt with. On being placed in the cells, however, he gave way to despondency, and attempted to kill himself by butting his head against the iron door. The cries of a fellow-prisoner attracted the attention of the warder, and measures were adopted to prevent his doing further violence to himself. He had already succeeded in placing his life in peril, his head being severely cut and bruised, and after the wounds had been dressed by Mr. S. Lodge, jun., he was removed to the Infirmary, where he is at present under treatment.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st June 1888


Last month one of the most unique specimens of the silversmith's art was presented to Mr. J. W. Roberts, of Headingley, on his opening the new ground of the Armley Cricket Club by bowling over the sward one of Peate's cricket balls, made for the occasion. To receive this ball, after having been thus used, a massive stand had been constructed, this forming the centre-piece of a trio of cricket and football ornaments. It consists of a hand and wrist, life size, the fingers and palm bent into the natural position for holding the ball ; this is erect, just as might be imagined in the act of bowling. The hand is silver, and has been modelled from life, the muscles, veins, and even the very texture of the skin, being reproduced with marvellous fidelity and truth. A handsomely-turned, solid, old English oak stand supports it, and this is further decorated by richly-engraved mountings and a solid silver plate, with an inscription. A second plate had been prepared, which, after the ceremony, was affixed to the ball, and this is inscribed as follows :–" This was the first ball bowled by the president, Mr. J. W. Roberts, on the occasion of the opening of the new cricket ground, August 18th, 1888." The centre stand, which is 22 inches in height, is flanked by two side-pieces, one representing a cricketer, bat in hand, backed by the wicket, and the other a football player in the act of taking a running kick at the " leather." The figures are of silver, and are borne upon old oaken pedestals, in keeping with the more important piece. Silver plates and scrolls, decorated in the Japanese style, adorn the two smaller pedestals, and the whole display has a rich appearance. The smaller stands are some 14 inches high. The carrying out of the ideas of the committee and the manufacturing of the trophies were entrusted to Messrs. Fattorini & Sons, of Kirkgate, Bradford, who have succeeded in providing a most creditable result.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st September 1888


The beautiful key with which Lord George Hamilton opened the door of the Bramley Conservative Club is about seven inches in length. The stem is a richly fluted column, surmounted by an elegantly beaded base and capital. On the front of the " head " are the arms and crest of Lord George Hamilton in brilliant enamels of red, white, and green, encircled by a blue enamelled ribbon, on which is inscribed the family motto, " Sola Nobilitas Virtus,'' the crest being surmounted by a coronet. On the reverse side of the head is the monogram of the Bramley Conservative Club, " B.C.C.," under which, on a plain but beautifully made shield and garter, is the following inscription :–" To Lord George Hamilton, November 2nd, 1889. Presented by Mr. Thomas Winn, architect, on the occasion of his Lordship opening the Conservative Club, Bramley." The whole is beautified and completed by various ornamentations of most original design, and is indeed a unique specimen of the goldsmith's art, and does great credit to Messrs. Fattorini and Sons, Bradford, who are the designers and makers.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 2nd December 1889


Established in 1831 by Antonio Fattorini.

Fattorini and Sons acquired the business of T. & J. Bragg of Birmingham in 1916.

Fattorini & Sons were acquired by Thomas Fattorini Ltd in 1983, they ceased business in 1986.

Fattorini and Sons entered their marks with the London, Birmingham, Chester and Sheffield assay offices.

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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 26, 2019 6:47 am

THOMAS FATTORINI - THOMAS FATTORINI (Birmingham) Ltd. - THOMAS FATTORINI (Skipton) Ltd. - THOMAS FATTORINI (Lancashire) Ltd.

Caroline Square and 73, High Street and 1-7, Newmarket Street, Skipton and Trafalgar Works, 5, Hockley Street, and Regent Works, Birmingham and 19, Knowsley Street, Bolton and Eccles and Urmston, Manchester and London


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Thomas Fattorini (Birmingham) Ltd. - Birmingham - 1933


A souvenir spoon issued by the Orrell Hard Court Tennis Club, made by Thomas Fattorini and assayed at Birmingham in 1929:

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T.F - Birmingham - 1929

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Thomas Fattorini (Skipton) Ltd., manufacturing jewellers, have bought Skipton Castle, including the gardens and grounds. Part of the castle dates from the Norman period, and it was the last fortress in the north to fall into the hands of Oliver Cromwell in the Civil War.

Source: Watchmaker, Jeweller & Silversmith - November 1956


Established in 1827.

Amongst the many trophies that the company have manufactured are the FA Cup and the Rugby League Challenge Cup.

Fattorini & Sons were acquired by Thomas Fattorini Ltd in 1983, both businesses being owned and managed by descendants of Antonio Fattorini.

Thomas Fattorini Ltd., was granted a Royal Warrant as a manufacturer of Insignia, Honours and Awards in 2008.

The business entered their marks with the London, Birmingham, Edinburgh, Sheffield and Chester assay offices.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
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Location: England

Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 28, 2019 6:26 am

JAMES SCOTT

Market Place, Hull


At an early hour on Friday morning the shop of James Scott, jeweller and watchmaker, Market-place, Hull, was broken into and robbed of stock to the value of £2,000, consisting of eighty watches and other articles. Entrance was effected through an empty shop next door, and a hole was drilled through the wall of Mr. Scott's shop. The burglars left several of their implements behind.

Source: The Western Mail - 29th November 1870

Trev.

dognose
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Posts: 40576
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
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Re: The English Provincial Trade - Yorkshire (Not Sheffield or York)

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 30, 2019 7:05 am

Z. BARRACLOUGH & SONS

54, Briggate, and Commercial Street, Leeds


Image
Z. Barraclough & Sons - Leeds - 1891

Established in 1805 by John Barraclough (TBC).

In 1887 the directors were noted as James Henry Barraclough (b.1861-d.1917) and Herbert Barraclough (b.1861-d.1940), who were the sons of Zerubbabel Barraclough (b.1824-d.1888)

The firm entered their marks, 'J·H·B/H·B' contained within a trefoil punch with the London Assay Office on the 29th November 1894, 3rd October 1896, 29th April 1897, 24th October 1907 and 13th July 1914 (different punch shape, see Sheffield registration).

Also 'ZB&S' and 'Z·B&S' contained within an oblong punch, with the Chester Assay Office on the 17th March 1896, 1st May 1897, 11th May 1911 and 21st May 1913.

Also 'J·H·B/H·B' (see below) with the Sheffield Assay Office on the 15th December 1888.

Image


Retailer mark of Z. Barraclough & Sons:

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Z. BARRACLOUGH & SONS/LEEDS


Z. BARRACLOUGH & SONS Limited.
The Companies Act, 1948.
(Members' Voluntary Winding-up.)
Special Resolution, passed the 31st day of March. 1958.
At an Extraordinary General Meeting held at 7, South Parade, Leeds 1, in the County of York, on the 31st day of March. 1958. the following Special Resolution was duly passed : —
" That the Company be wound up voluntarily and that Rupert Walton, Chartered Accountant, of 7, South Parade, Leeds 1, be and he is hereby appointed Liquidator for the purposes of such winding-up."
A. H. ROBSON, Chairman.


Source: The London Gazette - 11th April 1958

Trev.


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