Every Home Should Have One!

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 28, 2019 4:24 am

Every Home Should Have One!

A topic devoted to apparatus for cleaning etc. connected with silverware, cutlery, etc..

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 28, 2019 5:31 am

HUTCHISON'S PATENT FORK CLEANING MACHINE


Image
Messrs. Hutchison and Co. - London - 1881


Image
Messrs. Hutchison and Co. - London - c.1881


Image

This compact useful labour-saving machine is constructed to polish six silver or plated forks, either large or small, at one operation, by means of two soft brushes (one beneath and the other above the forks), being made to travel horizontally with a soft and uniform pressure evenly distributed over the forks. The placing in of the forks is done in a most simple manner—the small handle at the end of the machine is turned once from right to left, which operation brings out two little slides or ledges projecting sufficiently far enough under the extremities of the forks to allow them to be placed thereon, the handle is then turned back to its original position, and by this simple motion the slides are withdrawn, and the forks remain held from tip to tip, between flexible keys backed by springs ; the forks are thereby held in a secure and harmless manner, and without rigidity. The paste having been applied and the large handle turned a few times, the forks may be taken out with a most brilliant polish, without the slightest injury. The handle can be turned either way, it being immaterial which. We do not recommend this machine merely for the great amount of time and labour saved by it (which, nevertheless, is estimated at a greater proportion than six to one), but also for the preservation of forks, as it is well known that the prongs often sustain injury by the uneven pressure brought to bear upon them when cleaned by hand. We think the machine does its work admirably ; it is quick in action, economical in paste, and is certain to produce a brilliant polish. The manufacturers are Messrs. Hutchinson and Co., 51, Fann-street, Aldersgate-street, E.C,

Source: The Sewing Machine Gazette and Journal of Domestic Appliances - 1st February 1881



THE LABOUR-SAVING MACHINERY EXHIBITION, AGRICULTURAL HALL, MARCH, 1881

HUTCHISON AND CO., Fann-street, Aldersgate-street, E.C., exhibited a patent fork-cleaning machine, to clean six forks at a time, that goes to show what an age of labour-saving machinery we live in. It was a remarkably clever and effective contrivance.

Source: The Cabinet Maker - 1st April 1881


An exceptionally useful apparatus is the patent fork-cleaning machine exhibited by Messrs. Hutchison & Co., of Fann-street. By this machine half-a-dozen silver or plated forks, either large or small can be cleaned at one operation, by means of two soft brushes (one beneath and the other above the forks), which are made to travel horizontally with a soft and uniform pressure evenly distributed over the forks. The time and labour saved by the adoption of this fork-cleaner, especially in hotels and restaurants, would soon recoup its first cost.

Source: The Furniture Gazette - 19th March 1881


Around the stand of this firm, which faced the main entrance, numbers of visitors almost invariably clustered to inspect Hutchinson’s patent fork-cleaning machine, which we very recently fully described. This labour-saving invention was generally admired for its efficiency, and we anticipate that it will be ultimately adopted very generally. For hotels, clubs, restaurants, institutions, &c.—as well as private houses—it is so handy as an economiser of labour that the first cost is soon returned to the purchaser, on the principle that “ time is money."

Source: The British Trade Journal - 1st April 1881

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Fri Mar 29, 2019 5:54 am

PERRY & Co.'s PERFECT FORK CLEANER


Image
Perry & Co. - London - 1882

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 30, 2019 1:35 pm

R. HODD & SON'S PERFECTION KNIFE CLEANER (Cowdrey's Patent)


Image


A NEW SYSTEM OF KNIFE CLEANING.

Nearly three years since, Messrs. Hodd & Son, of the Minerva Works, Hatton Garden, introduced a new and simple system of cleaning knives, which is fast becoming popular, and promises to secure for itself a permanent footing in the household. At the Royal Agricultural Society's show at Kilburn, in July 1879, Messrs. Hodd & Son's machines, worked by boys who had never before seen them, cleaned the whole of the knives used in the principal refreshment department day by day, amounting to many thousands, and gained a most gratifying testimonial from Messrs. Roberts, the contractors, as to the excellent manner in which the work was done. The first machine patented by the firm was named the ' Lady Help'; this was followed by a second called the 'Despatch', having one or two little improvements, and recently a 'trio' has been completed by the introduction of a third, which they have christened the 'Perfection', and of which we append an engraving. The main principle is the same in all three, that is to say, the knives are all cleaned by passing them through two rollers, though there are small differences in detail in each. Taking the one we illustrate as an example, we may say that it occupies a space of only about 7 1/2 inches square, and is screwed on to the dresser or any convenient place in the kitchen. The frame is of iron, and the rollers are of the best vulcanised india rubber, underneath them being a shallow trough in which the knife-cleaning powder is placed. This is caught up by the bottom roller in its revolutions and carried back to the top one in a similar manner, the knife is placed between the rollers, the handles turned, and with a few revolutions, and drawing he knife backwards and forwards during the operaion, it is effectively cleaned. The rollers are regulated by a screw at each end, but they do not touch each other, so that there is an entire absence of fiction between them. The important points claimed by Messrs. Hodd and Son's system is that it does ot wear away the knives, that the machine itself is aImost indestructible, that it is much lower in price than a good rotary machine, and that it will, although cleaning only one knife at a time, do its work as rapidly, and that it is free from the constant expense entailed by using the rotary machine. One striking feature in this system we have yet to name. It is well known that apart from the rapid wearing away of knives cleaned by the rotary machine, they have not had bright appearance, which is not the most pleasing to the eye. In the 'Perfection' and its sister machines, after a few cleanings, a brilliant polish put upon them which is permanent, and gives them a very close resemblance in colour to silver. One instance is known to us in which the machine has been in use for three years; has cost nothing for repair, and is practically as good as the first day was made; while the knives cleaned by it are scaresly reduced in size, though in daily wear.


Source: The Sanitary Record - March 1881


Image
R. Hodd & Son - London - 1883

The patent was registered to Charles Cowdrey.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 02, 2019 5:24 am

MADDEN'S IMPROVED KNIFE CLEANER


Image


The accompanying engraving is a representation of a new Knife Cleaner, Polisher, and Sharpener, the invention of Mr. Madden, of George Street, Adelphi. It performs what it professes to do in a very effectual manner, with one half the labour and time by the old method, making no dust or noise. The great merit of the invention is its compactness and portability.

The machine is fixed upon a stand 12 in. long by 8 in.; it consists of two parallel cheeks of iron, the interior faces of which are slightly bevilled, and lined with buff leather; these cheeks are pressed together by two springs by which they are suspended on the top of the cheeks is a groove to receive the brick-dust. When a knife is to be cleaned, it is placed between the cheeks at one end, and drawn backwards and forwards, which causes a small portion of the brick-dust to dropdown, and by which means the knife is thoroughly cleaned.

The price of the machine is 15s.


Source: The Civil Engineer and Architect's Journal - 24th February 1844


Image
Madden - London - 1845

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 04, 2019 4:08 am

R. HODD & SON'S LADY HELP KNIFE CLEANER (Cowdrey's Patent)


Image

COWDERY'S PATENT KNIFE CLEANER

Messrs. R. Hodd & Son, of Hatton Garden, London, E.C., are introducing to the trade a remarkable effective little implement, called “The ‘Lady-Help' Knife Cleaner” (Cowdery's Patent) of which they are the sole makers and licensees. As will be seen from our illustration, the “Lady-Help” machine is more compact than any other knife cleaner in the market, the dimensions of the apparatus complete being 7 in. by 6 in., and 9 in. high. There is no casing required, all the mechanism, which is of the simplest kind, being exposed to view, so that the operator can see the progress of the work which this machine accomplishes so readily and well. It consists of a japanned iron frame within which are enclosed a pair of cylindrical rollers of India-rubber in suitable bearings, the rollers being made to revolve by cog wheels turned by a small handle. The motion is smooth, rapid, cleanly, and easy, and can scarcely be put out of running gear even by the most inexperienced domestic “help.” The operation of this machine thoroughly cleans any size knife, including carvers, with a smooth polish like silver, imparting to table cutlery in daily use an appearance hitherto unattainable by any known process of ordinary knife cleaning. It is claimed that Cowdery's patent knife cleaner cannot damage knives or their handles, whether ivory or silver, nor wear them away, as they only come in contact with the India-rubber. Carving forks can also be thoroughly cleaned in every part. From its compactness the new knife cleaner is well suited for shipment to colonial and other foreign markets.


Source: The Scientific Canadian - September 1879


Image
R. Hodd & Son - London - 1880


Ten different versions of 'The Lady Help' were shown by R. Hodd & Son at the International Agricultural Exhibition in 1879:

Image
International Agricultural Exhibition - London - 1879

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 06, 2019 6:27 am

THE 'RAPID' HORIZONTAL KNIFE CLEANER (Hargrave's Patent)


Image
Wm. Duff & Co. - London - 1886

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 16, 2019 2:01 am

DIXON'S KNIFE CLEANER (Genhart's Patent)


Image
Adam Dixon - Birmingham - 1858


Patented by Henry Genhart, Armourer, of Liége, Belgium.

SPECIFICATIONS OF PATENTS RECENTLY FILED

GENHART, H. An improved apparatus for cleaning and sharpening knives, and cleaning spoons and forks. Dated July 31, 1857. (No. 2087.) This consists of a cylindrical brush fitting tightly in a metal tube. The said tube is supported and closed at its ends by metal standards, through the centres of which pass an axle, on which a circular brush is fixed, and revolves therewith, by means of a handle fixed on one end of the said axle. On the other end of the aforesaid axle, and at the outside of that standard which supports this end of the tube containing the circular brush, a narrow circular brush is fixed, and designed for the purpose of cleaning the ferrules of knives simultaneously with the blades thereof, and by substituting another brush in place of this last-mentioned brush spoons may be cleaned. The blades of the knives are introduced into the apparatus through slits or openings formed in the rim of one of the standards thereof. On the uppermost part of the aforesaid tube is a receptacle containing brick dust, &c., which passes by an outlet to the brush in the tube.


Source: Mechanics Magazine - 8th May 1858

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 23, 2019 3:36 am

THE HORIZONTAL KNIFE CLEANER (Appleton's Patent)


Image
W. Pickering - London - 1883

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 05, 2019 5:11 am

MASTERS'S PATENT KNIFE CLEANER


Image
Mr. Masters's Establishment - London - 1848

Image
Thomas Masters - London - 1850

Image
T. Masters & Company - London - 1851

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 29, 2019 4:47 am

NON. X.L. KNIFE CLEANER - THE SERVANTS' FRIEND KNIFE CLEANER


Image
Spong & Co. - London - 1886

Established in 1856.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Thu Oct 31, 2019 4:34 am

DRIVERS - KNIFE AND FORK CLEANING MACHINE


Image

Image

Source: The Weekly Telegraph - 9th October 1897

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Mon Nov 04, 2019 4:56 am

UNIVERSAL KNIFE & FORK CLEANING MACHINE & KNIFE SHARPENER


Image
E.F. Bockham - Dover - 1913

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40553
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Every Home Should Have One!

Postby dognose » Wed Nov 06, 2019 11:33 am

FOLLOWS & BATES KNIFE CLEANER


Image
Follows & Bates - Manchester - c.1880

Trev.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests