Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Oct 01, 2014 1:26 pm

Harrison Bros. & Howson

Sheffield


Fred Heslop
Jack Parker


The master cutler, Mr. P.J.C. Bovill flew on the inaugural flight of the Manchester to New York service. He took a gift for Mayor Wagner of New York, a pair of stag-handled steak carvers and a dozen stag-handled steak knives and forks. They were made by two craftsmen at Harrison Bros. & Howson, Mr. Fred Heslop, who has been with the firm 54 years, and Mr. Jack Parker, who has been with the firm 35 years.

Source: Watchmaker, Jeweller & Silversmith - July 1960

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 02, 2014 6:39 am

Hollis and Newman

Birmingham


Thomas Jennings - (Jeweller)

A Receiver Severely Punished.–At Birmingham, on the 25th ult., Thomas Jennings (34), jeweller, was indicted for stealing, on May 15, 3½ ounces of silver scrap and 14½ dwts. of gold scrap, the goods of William Edward Hollis and another, his employers ; and Henry Shaw (61), jeweller, was indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen. Mr. Hugo Young appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. Parfitt defended Shaw.–Jennings pleaded guilty.–The police searched the house of Shaw with respect to betting transactions on May 15. As Detectives Moxon and Taylor were walking towards the house Shaw was seen to be talking to Jennings, his son-in-law. Jennings went away and the house was searched. The officers found in a drawer two packets of gold and silver scrap and two small melting pots. The former looked as though it had been recently cut and the latter as though they had been recently used. In reply to questions by the detectives Shaw said he had had the scrap in his possession for some years. As the result of inquiries it was discovered that the scrap had been stolen from Messrs. Hollis and Newman, Tenby Street North, where Jennings was employed. Jennings was arrested, and admitted being the thief, but Shaw persisted in the statement that he had had the scrap in his possession for some years. The defence was that Shaw was a jeweller, and that he had the scrap in his possession in the ordinary way of his trade. Prisoner was found guilty and sentenced to five years' penal servitude. Jennings was sent to gaol for six months.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st July 1890

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 22, 2014 9:27 am

ROBERT PRINGLE & SONS (London) Ltd.

On the 8th October 1935, a evening of entertainment and presentations was held at Finsbury Town Hall, London, to celebrate the Centenary Anniversary of the foundation of Robert Pringle & Sons. During the course of events that evening, presentations were made to 35 members of staff who had served the company for 25 years or longer. The longest serving member of staff was Fred Simmons, who had worked in the polishing shop at Pringle's for no less than 49 years.

Below is a list of the long-serving employees:

Mr. Simmons - 49 years
Mr. Russell - 44 years
Miss Walton - 42 years
Mr. Hilliard - 39 years
Miss Taylor - 39 years
Miss Eborn - 38 years
Mr. T. Wood - 37 years
Mr. H. Child - 36 years
Mr. Cragg - 36 years
Mr. Ginsburg - 36 years
Mr. Dargavel - 35 years
Mr. E, G. Harris - 35 years
Mr. Hix - 34 years
Mr. W. Green - 33 years
Mr. Pain - 33 years
Mr. Bending - 32 years
Mr. Clare - 32 years
Mr. Livemore - 32 years
Mr. Nolan - 32 years
Mr. W.J. Wood - 32 years
Mr. Bellenie - 30 years
Mr. Bucknell - 30 years
Mr. Dixon - 30 years
Mr. C. Green - 30 years
Miss Jowers - 30 years
Mr. Parker - 30 years
Miss Clements - 29 years
Miss Goodwin - 29 years
Mr. Frost - 27 years
Mr. Hayres - 27 years
Mr. Rapps - 27 years
Mr. Barton - 25 years
Mr. Palmer - 25 years
Mr. Peacock - 25 years

Mr. Mason (Auditor) - 28 years

Each of the above named was presented with a silver bowl bearing the Jubilee Mark, engraved with the recipient's initials, and the inscription on the rim of the bowl read "Wilderness Works Centenary - Jubilee Year, 1935," together with the number of years service.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 23, 2014 7:22 am

Thomas Holt Freeman

Birmingham


James Parkes (Jeweller)

Action for Wrongful Dismissal.–An action has been brought at Birmingham by Jas. Parkes, working jeweler, Arthur Place, Brookfields Road, against Thos. Holt Freeman, jeweler, of Northampton Street, to recover £52 9s. 10d. damages for breach of an agreement. The plaintiff's case was that in September, 1890, he was engaged under a written agreement to work as a jeweler for the defendant during the period of three years. In the first two years he was to receive 35s. a week, and 40s. in the third year. Last August the plaintiff was told by the defendant that owing to slackness in trade he would not be able to find him work, and he was accordingly dismissed. He was out of work for a fortnight, and then obtained work at 32s. 6d. a week. He claimed damages for loss of wages. The defence was that the plaintiff was discharged for insolence, and defendant paid £4 into Court in respect of the damages for loss of work during the time plaintiff was out of a situation. The jury gave a verdict for the plaintiff for £15.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st November 1892

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 05, 2015 5:01 am

B.H. Joseph & Co.

Birmingham


Archibald Williams (Apprentice)


One of Messrs. B. H. Joseph & Co.'s apprentices (Mr. Archibald Williams) has been awarded the first prize of the Birmingham School of Art branch of the Birmingham Jewellers' and Silversmiths' Association, for a set of drawings of shells, and the second prize for a sketch design.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st April 1889

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Jan 24, 2015 2:52 pm

Barker Ellis Silver Co.Ltd.

Birmingham


Ronald Attwood (Silversmith)

Image

Ronald Attwood is known in the trade as a make-up man - but he's not a bit interested in faces.

What he makes up is sterling silver in traditional English designs, ranging from exquisite fruit spoons to elaborate wine cradles.

He works for the Birmingham firm of Barker Ellis and for two weeks, starting from tomorrow at David Jones' Market Street store, he will demonstrate his skill as a silversmith.

He began his apprenticeship 22 years ago, and in his soft 'Brum' accent he said:

"My father always told me: 'Get a trade and you'll be set for the rest of your life'. I've always enjoyed working with my hands and there's a great satisfaction when someone gives you a drawing and makes you something up from it. It's a feeling that's hard to explain unless you're in the trade."

The demand for silver in traditional styles, he said, is growing.

" People buy it for weddings and anniversaries - even young people do. All kinds of people, for example are starting to have a silver condiment set on the table and even a tray we make, which costs $300, sells like mad.

"I think the reason is that silver today hold its price - really it's as good as money in the bank.

"Australia is becoming a very good market for silver now. We've found that Australians are starting to appreciate this kind of work."

At the factory in Birmingham Mr Attwood runs a training school for apprentice silversmiths and the skill is passed on by word of mouth rather than anything written.

"It's all up here," he grinned, tapping his head with his finger.

"We only take on six apprentices at a time and they stay with me for five years. And if we get one lad out of the six who's really good at the work, then we're satisfied.

But despite his passion for the stuff, Ronald Attwood doesn't have any silver at home.

"I don't have any at all - I work with it all the time and I believe in leaving my work behind when I go home," he smiled.


Source: Sun-Herald - 12th November 1972

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Jan 28, 2015 10:10 am

JOHN MILLWARD BANKS

Birmingham


Joseph Donlan (Finishing Department Manager)


At the Birmingham Police Court last month, before Mr. A. Hill (Deputy Stipendiary), Joseph Donlan, 20, 99, Little King Street, Hockley, was charged with stealing a large quantity of jewellery, the property of his employer Mr. John Millward Banks, manufacturing jeweller of Northampton Street, Birmingham. Dr. Showell Rogers, (Johnson and Co.), prosecuted, and Mr. Benbow Hebbert was for the defence. Dr. Rogers, in opening the case, stated that the prisoner entered prosecutor's employ in May last, and it was quite evident that since the commencement of his stay there he had been in the habit of stealing jewellery, and afterwards pawning the same with pawnbrokers in the vicinity. Latterly, however, he seemed to have extended his operations, and at the present time they could trace transactions with no less than 30 pawnbrokers. It should be said that after being at the place a little time he was given the important position of manager of the finishing department, and thousands of valuable articles passed through his hands. On September 5 he left his work without permission, and it had been found that on the same day he pawned a bracelet with Mr. Samuels, of West Bromwich. The latter was not quite satisfied with the prisoner's conduct, and insisted upon going with him to the address he gave, and which had since been proved to be false. While walking together prisoner admitted that the bracelet belonged to his girl. The pawnbroker pretended to believe him, and took him back to his shop, where he turned the key upon him. No less than 76 pawn-tickets 'had been found in his possession, and goods had been pledged to the extent of £22, while their real value was something like £80 or £100. Some difficulty would be experienced in making the charges, as no two pawnings had been made in one and the same day, and none of the goods purloined were over £2 in value. He thought perhaps it would be better if two cases were taken separately. Philip Lewin Samuels, 277, High Street, West Bromwich, was the first witness, and stated that he carried on business as a pawnbroker. On September 5, prisoner came to pledge a bracelet (produced) at his shop. He said it was his own, and asked for 15s. to be advanced upon it. Not being satisfied with his statement he called in police-sergeant Reynolds who took him into custody. Henry Shorthouse, attached to the West Bromwich police, deposed to receiving the prisoner at the station. He communicated with police-sergeant Baker, of Birmingham, and through him he was handed over to the authorities of this town. In the second case prisoner was charged with stealing a silver brooch. Richard Riley, assistant at Mr. W. H. Wood's, establishment, in High Street, stated that on August 5 he pawned a brooch with them and received 4s. upon it. He gave his name as Walter Green, 25, New John Street. Sergeant Baker stated that from information received he went to the house of prisoner's father. In a room occupied by the prisoner he found the 76 pawn tickets mentioned above, including the one given with the brooch. In answer to a question put from the Bench, witness stated that papers relative to betting transactions had been found upon him. Mr. Hill : As I thought. I firmly believe that nine-tenths of the offences brought before me are traceable to this evil. A sentence of three months' imprisonment in each case was imposed. At the conclusion of the trial Dr. Rogers raised the question as to whether an order might be made entitling the prosecutor to claim the goods produced in court. Mr. Barradale: But the goods have only been produced in two specific cases. Dr. Rogers : Well, in the cases in which Mr. Wood are interested, I think we can claim them. The pawnbroker did not act with discretion in the matter, for all the goods were unfinished, and moreover, five separate lots were pledged by the prisoner in different names. Mr. Wood's assistant : Yes, but they were not all received by the same men. Mr. Banks subsequently admitted that, although the goods were technically unfinished, yet to the eye of anyone but an expert they would seem to be finished. The magistrate was of the opinion that the parties had better act in the manner usual under the circumstances, viz., each share half the loss. Mr. Hill then publicly thanked Mr. Samuels for his conduct in the matter, and was of the opinion, too, that no stigma was attached to the second pawnbroker mentioned.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st October 1889

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 09, 2015 2:49 pm

JAMES BARBER & Co.

York


Thomas Fox (Clerk)

INSOLVENT DEBTORS
PETITIONS TO BE HEARD
At the Court, in Portugal-street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, Middlesex

Wednesday, September 23, at 9

Fox Thomas, formerly of Blake-street, clerk to Messrs. Barber and Co. goldsmiths and jewellers, next of Stonegate, and late of St. Helens-square, dealer in fancy articles and jeweller, also residing at the same time in Blake-street, all in York, and also lately of Berwick-street, Oxford-street, Middlesex, out of business.


Source: The Law Advertiser - 9th September 1830

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 28, 2015 4:50 am

SOHO PLATE WORKS

Birmingham


Edward Evans (Silversmith)

“ I, Edward Evans, silversmith, certify that I worked at the Soho Plate works during a period of ten years. I was mostly employed in making silver articles; silver solder was always used by me to strengthen all hollow straight mounts struck from dies requiring to be bent, and in other raised mountings it was universally used to strengthen. Articles I know from experience cannot be made without. Solder was given to us with the silver for that purpose, and used as we judged proper.

“ I am, your respectful servant,

“ EDWARD EVANS “December 8th, 1846.”


Source: The Assay Office and the Silver Plate Trade. A Statement of Facts, with Accompanying Observations, in Reference to the Libellous Attacks of the "Birmingham Journal." - George Richmond Collis - 1846

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 01, 2015 9:52 am

SOHO PLATE WORKS

Birmingham


Thomas Evans (Silversmith)

" I, Thomas Evans, silversmith, do hereby certify that I worked at the Soho Plate Works during a period of fifty-five years, and generally made silver articles; it was the practice in that manufactory to use silver solder to strengthen all hollow mountings which required to be bent to enable the workmen to fix them on the articles. Solder was always used by us to other highly raised mounts to strengthen them as required; silver and solder were always weighed out as one, and used at the discretion of the workman. I have used it on all occasions myself in such manner, and others did the same; it is absolutely necessary, and in such mountings it could not be dispensed with, as every practical workman well knows.

" I am, your obedient servant,

Thomas Evans"


Source: The Assay Office and the Silver Plate Trade. A Statement of Facts, with Accompanying Observations, in Reference to the Libellous Attacks of the "Birmingham Journal." - George Richmond Collis - 1846

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 10, 2015 2:36 pm

GEORGE RICHMOND COLLIS & Co.

Birmingham


Henry Fellows - (Foreman Silversmith)

"As Foreman of the silver department in Messrs. Collis and Co.’s Works, I feel it my duty to state that Mr. Collis was entirely unacquainted with my having ordered the workman to repair the omission he had made in not strengthening the feet of the venison dishes which had been previously sent with other work and assayed, forgetting at the moment the necessity of informing the Assay Office of the required addition. A similar instance never having occurred in my experience, I went immediately to the Assay Office, and at once explained the error in not informing them previously, and was ready to give every explanation to the General Meeting. In answer to a question from one of the Wardens, I stated that silver and silver solder of the best quality only had been used in making the required addition. A large quantity of other articles belonging to the same service, and then in a finished state were, unsolicited, sent for by Mr. Collis, and the same were weighed by the Wardens in my presence, and weighed considerably less in weight than duty had been paid for. Mr. Collis stated that he only used silver solder in the making up of articles as is usual in the trade, and also absolutely necessary to particular articles, Mr. Collis wishing them to take off the feet and judge for themselves. The Assay Master and Wardens seemed perfectly satisfied how the error had arisen, and I doubted not but the article would have been returned at once, requiring only the feet to he re-assayed, but upon Mr. Ryland, sol., and one of the Wardens, Mr. Ryland’s father, I believe, going out of the room, consulted for some time; they returned, and stated it was considered advisable to call a meeting of the Guardians to consult together and have their opinion; and know how far the use of silver solder could be permitted in making up silver articles, to which Mr. Collis readily assented. I feel with others that the whole affair has been most falsely stated, not on public grounds, but to serve the interest of jealous and designing parties at any hazard.

"Your obedient servant,
"Henry Fellows.

"Birmingham, December 26, 1846."


Source: The Assay Office and the Silver Plate Trade. A Statement of Facts, with Accompanying Observations, in Reference to the Libellous Attacks of the "Birmingham Journal." - George Richmond Collis - 1846

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 15, 2015 10:09 am

GEORGE RICHMOND COLLIS & Co. - EDWARD THOMASON

Birmingham

James Creswick - (Silversmith)

“I, James Creswick, do hereby state that I have worked at the manufactory of Messrs. Collis and Co., and for Sir Edward Thomason, during a period of 18 years, and previously for other manufacturers. It has always been the custom where I have worked to use silver solder in making up silver goods. Straight mountings taken from dies could not be bent without it. Also it is used to strengthen mountings of high relief, to prevent their being easily bruised in use. The trouble in strengthening is, in most instances, equal to the difference in value of silver and silver solder.
“ JAMES CRESWICK.

“ December 8th, 1846.”


Source: The Assay Office and the Silver Plate Trade. A Statement of Facts, with Accompanying Observations, in Reference to the Libellous Attacks of the "Birmingham Journal." - George Richmond Collis - 1846

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 19, 2015 11:13 am

DIBDIN & Co.Ltd.

London

David Izzard - (Apprentice - Foreman of the Jewellers' shop)

On the 4th December 1931 David Izzard completed fifty years service with Dibdin & Co.Ltd., starting off as a apprentice and eventually becoming foreman of the jewellers' shop.

Source: Watchmaker, Jeweller & Slversmith - January 1932

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=30091&p=118129&hilit=dibdin#p118129

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Sep 19, 2015 11:19 am

ATKIN BROTHERS

Sheffield


At the British Industries Fair of 1938, the following long service employees of Atkin Brothers were presented to Queen Mary:

Harry Dennis - 63 years
John Stokes - 62 years
Ezra Lee - 60 years
Sidney Jones - 56 years

The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith reported in April 1938, that of the 31 senior employees of Atkin Brothers, the average number of years' service was 47 years, 4 months.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 22, 2015 12:02 pm

JAMES DIXON & SONS

Sheffield


Charles Holliday - (Designer)
Trevor Collins - (Silversmith)

Club House Replica in Silver - A scale model in fine silver of the Augusta Golf Club House in Georgia, America, has just been completed for a Chicago jeweller by a Sheffield firm. Designed by Mr. Charles Holliday and made by a 23-year-old silversmith, Mr. Trevor Collins, the replica is the new trophy for the Golf Masters Tournament of America. It measures 38 inches across its plinth and stands 21 inches high, weighing 625 ounces.

Source: Jeweller & Metalworker - 1st February 1961.

Charles Holliday joined James Dixon & Sons in 1927 having studied design and silversmithing at Sheffield College of Art. He went on to become Dixon's chief designer and worked at the firm for fifty years, enjoying a highly successful career. During his working life, he designed many significant sporting trophies. These included the Masters Golf Tournament trophy, Eisenhower golf trophy and sixteen Grand National winning owner trophies.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 27, 2015 11:44 am

JAMES DIXON & SONS

Sheffield

Richard Axelby - (Chaser)

Richard Axelby started his career as a chaser with James Dixon & Sons in 1929, he remained with the firm for the next 52 years. Whilst with Dixons he was involved in the production of many important pieces, including the Grand National trophies designed by Charles Holliday and the Hales Trophy when he was a apprentice. He described his experience of working on the Hales Trophy in an article published in the Sheffield Weekly Gazette, 25th April 1991: "When I worked on the Hales Trophy I was only an apprentice…They let me try my hand on the waves that went round the stand. I suppose they thought it wouldn't show if I made a mistake, but I didn't".

The Hales Trophy was commissioned in 1935 by Harold K. Hales (1868–1942), Member of Parliament for Hanley, Staffordshire and owner of Hales Brothers shipping company. The trophy was awarded for the fastest crossing of the Atlantic by a passenger liner. The title was called the Blue Riband and the Hales Trophy became unofficially known by that title. The trophy was almost five foot in height and was made from silver gilt and enamel and stood upon an onyx base.

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Riband

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 01, 2015 1:59 pm

STOCKALL MARPLES & Co.Ltd.

London


A.J. Gulliver - (Material Fitter)

Obituary

Mr. A.J. Gulliver

Employed by Stockall Marples & Co. Ltd., Clerkenwell Road, London, as a material fitter since 1930, Mr. A.J. Gulliver collapsed on his way to work on 2nd January and was found to be dead on arrival at the hospital. He leaves a widow.


Source: Jeweller & Metalworker - 1st February 1967


See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=30091&p=92139&hilit=stockall#p92139

and: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=21567&p=50245&hilit=stockall#p50245

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 22, 2015 7:48 am

MORTIMER & HUNT

London


Robert Crawley - (Factory Porter)

Robert Crawley, aged twenty-seven, factory porter, in the employment of the firm of Mortimer & Hunt, the eminent silversmiths of Bond-street. The speech of this patient had always been imperfect. At four years of age he was unable to articulate a single word. When he did begin to talk, it was in a dreadfully stammering manner, which continued to increase as he grew older, and was, at the time he presented himself in Sackville-street, of a most painful and aggravated character. During his childhood his friends had placed him under various teachers of stammerers, who had all failed to afford any relief to the impediment.

On examining the throat, I found both tonsils and the uvula in an enlarged state. I immediately removed the uvula and the tonsil of the right side, which produced an almost miraculous relief. He expressed himself as free from the impediment. On a subsequent visit, he informed me, that being aware of the decided opposition of his parents to his undergoing any operation, he had determined to say nothing to them until after its performance. Upon his return home, the day of the operation, he had occasion to speak to a younger brother, a lad about fifteen years of age, who, after looking very earnestly at him for a few seconds, ran to his mother, exclaiming, "Mother, how well our Bob speaks!" This alone would be sufficient to show the relief afforded in the case; but he tells me, that all who have come in contact with him have noticed the remarkable improvement.

March 30th. Up to this present time this case has gone on most favourably; nothing can be more delightful than the ease with which he now speaks, as compared with his former difficulty.

April 25th. Reports himself cured.



Source: Stammering, and other Imperfections of Speech, Treated by Surgical Operations on the Throat - James Yearsley - 1841

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 26, 2015 2:11 pm

JOHN CLARK

Edinburgh


James Gilliland - (Journeyman)
Thomas Borthwick - (Journeyman)
William Bogie - (Apprentice) Indentures booked 12th October 1751
Norman McKenzie - (Apprentice) Indentures booked 15th August 1759
Thomas Porter - (Apprentice) Indentures booked 30th July 1762
Robert Little - (Apprentice) Indentures booked 21st December 1763
John McDuff - (Apprentice) Indentures booked 15th April 1767
William Caulder - (Apprentice) Indentures booked 21st June 1769

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=31210&p=122908&hilit=clark#p122908

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 01, 2016 1:55 pm

JOSEPH GLOSTER

Birmingham


Arthur Wells - (Silversmith)
Joseph Rose - (Silversmith)

ALLEGED EXTENSIVE THEFT OF SILVER - The police believe they are getting to the bottom of extensive thefts in the jewellery quarter in the arrest of Arthur Wells (35), of Chester Street, Aston, Joseph Rose (50), of the back of 98, Branston Street, and Edward Lyon, of 56, Court, Brearley Street. The two first-named are silversmiths, and Lyon is a jeweller. Wells and Rose are charged with the theft of a considerable quantity of silver, which, if what the prosecutor alleges be true, Lyon has received illegally. The silver belongs to Joseph Gloster, manufacturing silversmith, of 34, Vyse Street, where Wells and Rose have been employed. The arrests were made by Detective-inspector Taylor and Detective Kilby. Further investigations are to be instituted, Mr. Gloster having been missing silver for some time, and for police purposes the prisoners stand remanded.

Source: The Birmingham Daily Post - 16th August 1900

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