Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Feb 07, 2016 3:32 pm

WALTER WILLIAM CASHMORE

Birmingham


Thomas Jones

Thomas Jones, alias Smith, alias Professor Jones, living at the back of 19, Tenby Street, was charged with stealing a quantity of scrap silver, the property of Walter William Cashmore, manufacturing jeweler, of 26, Hockley Street, Birmingham. The prisoner is in the employ of the prosecutor, and the latter, in consequence of information received from the police, marked a quantity of scrap silver. That silver was missed on Wednesday evening, and it was subsequently found in the possession of the prisoner by Detective-Inspector Monk and Detective- Sergeant Taylor. There was a previous conviction against the prisoner, who was committed to the Sessions for trial.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 2nd November 1981

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 15, 2016 10:39 am

PATON & Co. Ltd.

London


S.H. Hagon - (Apprentice. later, Superintendent)

S.H. Hagon spent 70 years working at Patons, having served his apprenticeship with this firm of manufacturing jewellers, he later supervised the workshops for a period of 50 years up until one month of his death on the 24th January 1923, aged 83 years.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Mar 30, 2016 1:51 pm

WILLIAM RAWLINS SOBEY

Exeter


William George Caunter - (Apprentice)

After leaving the employment of William Rawlins Sobey, W.G. Caunter took up trade of a Wine and Spirit Merchant. In 1875 he was admitted as a Member of the Exeter Goldsmiths' Guild and in 1877 appointed, along with J.E. Lake, as Warden of the Company for that year. He served further terms as Warden in 1878, 1882 and 1883. He was the last surviving member of the Exeter Goldsmiths' Guild at his death in early 1912.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon May 30, 2016 12:00 pm

WALTER FRANCIS READING

London


John Carter - (Pipe-mounter)


Theft of Pipe-Mounts

John Carter, aged twenty-nine, a pipe-mounter, of Canrobert Street, Bethnal Green, was charged at Clerkenwell, on July 21, with stealing 3 oz. of silver, value 30s, the property of Walter Reading, pipe-mounter.

The prosecutor said the prisoner had been in his employment for several months. On the morning of the 14th inst he sent Carter to the Goldsmiths' Hall with a parcel of pipe mounts. The prisoner did not return, and ascertaining that Carter had not been to the Goldsmiths' Hall, he communicated with the police.

Detective-sergeant Dolden proved arresting Carter in the Bethnal Green Road. In answer to the charge the prisoner said, ‘I was drunk, or I would not have done it. I intended to go back.’

Mr. Bros sent Carter to gaol for twenty-one days.


Source: Tobacco - 1st August 1896

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Oct 10, 2016 2:13 pm

HENRY PERKINS & SONS

London


Charles Butcher - (Stick Mounter)


Charles Butcher, 27, a stick-mounter, pleaded 'Guilty' to stealing 2,000 oz. of silver and a number of gold rings, the property of Henry Perkins and Sons, stick-mounters of Tottenham Court Road. Mr. C. L. Attenborough, who was for the prosecution, said that on the evening of February 16th a carman, named Goldsmith, who was near the prosecutor's premises in Howland Mews, observed the prisoner lower the property in two sacks from the second-floor window. He called out, and the prisoner then slung himself out on to the ground, in doing which he sprained his foot, but managed to escape. He was arrested three days later, but the witness failed to identify him until he heard his voice. The property was recovered. Detective-sergeant Buxton said that the prisoner had been employed by the prosecutors for six years on and off. Other robberies had been committed, and his fellow employees had been suspected. Mr. Wallace said that he would give the prisoner a chance. He had never before been convicted, and he would now be bound over to come up for judgment if called upon.

Source: The Times - 11th May 1907

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 16, 2017 1:28 pm

THE KNOWN APPRENTICES OF JAMES GILLILAND

Edinburgh


John Cockburn (Apprentice) 1748 - (indentures booked 9th August 1748) - Son of John Cockburn, Wright in Wrightshouses, and Helen Bizet.
James Cumming (Apprentice) 1752 - (indentures booked on 19th October 1752) - Son of James Cumming, Mariner in Leith.
James Sands (Apprentice) 1756 - (indentures booked on 28th April 1756) - Son of William Sands of Rosehall and Eupham Burn.
Neil Paton - (Apprentice) 1757
Andrew McEwan (Apprentice) 1762 - (indentures booked on 2nd March 1762) - Son of James McEwan, Dyer in Canongate.
John Chalmers (Apprentice) 1765
Robert Bowman (Apprentice) 1767
Sir Henry Raeburn (Apprentice) 1771 - (indentures booked on 16th November 1771) - Son of Robert Raeburn, Mill-owner. He was Knighted by George IV in 1822 for his work as Portrait Painter. Died 8th July 1823.
Robert Stewart (Apprentice) 1778 - (indentures booked on 22nd July 1778) - Son of James Stewart, Glover.
Francis Clark (Apprentice) 1783 - (indentures booked on 9th October 1783) - Son of Alexander Clark, Linen Printer at Bonnington Mills, and Margaret Wright
Alexander Grant (Apprentice) 1786 - (indentures booked on 15th June 1786) - Son of John Grant, Cabinetmaker at Edinburgh. His apprenticeship was transferred to another Master, Alexander Gardner, on 4th May 1792, due to death of James Gilliland.

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=31210&p=137902&hilit=Gilliland#p137902

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 02, 2017 1:53 pm

GEORGE LOVERIDGE

Birmingham

Hagley (Journeyman) March 1872 - March 1873


SELECT CASES IN THE COUNTY COURTS

LIABILITY OF A MINOR


At the Birmingham County Court the case of Loveridge v. Hagley was an action brought by Mr. George Loveridge, silversmith and jeweller, Birmingham, against a workman named Hagley, to recover the sum of 19l. 1s. 2d., money overdrawn on account of work unfinished.—Mr. Piercy Wilkinson appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. Burton for the defendant.—The defendant had pleaded infancy.—Mr. Wilkinson said that was a plea which covered a great quantity of charges, but there were certain exceptions, and he thought his Honour would be of opinion that this was one in which the defendant had rendered himself personally liable. In March, 1872, the defendant went to Mr. Loveridge and offered himself to do certain work in the trade of jeweller. Mr. Loveridge accepted him under certain conditions. In answer to questions put to him by Mr. Loveridge, he stated that he was 22 years of age, and had been in the employment of other persons, mentioning their names and the length of time he ad been employed. It was agreed that Hagley should serve as a journeyman for Mr. Loveridge for a weekly sum of 30s. He did so serve until from March, 1872, to October of the same year, when there was a further agreement come to between them, whereby the defendant was to go on piece-work. He worked on these conditions until March, 1873, when he complained to Mr. Loveridge that he was ill, and said he wanted to go into the country to recruit his health. At that time a statement was drawn up between them, and from that statement it appeared that the defendant had overdrawn on account of piece-work the sum of 22l 6s. 8d. The plaintiff alleged that the excuse of ill-health was a fabrication, for within a few days of the defendant leaving him, he entered into another person's employment. Before this the defendant had told Mr. Loveridge that he had a chance of a better situation in the coloured gold trade, and that when his health was restored he should be able to pay the balance due. The case was brought before the magistrates, and the defendant was ordered to return to his work, but by an agreement between the parties the defendant gave a promissory note for the amount due, and engaged to pay 1l. per month. Some payments had been made, which reduced the amount to the sum now sought to be recovered.—After the examination of the plaintiff and of a witness who had frequently heard the defendant say he was 22 years old, Mr. Burton submitted that the defendant was not liable, as the contract was not beneficial to the infant, which it was clearly laid down it must be before the plaintiff could recover.—After hearing Mr. Wilkinson on the other side, his Honour quoted several cases bearing on the question, and said it was quite clear that if upon the settling of the amount due between the parties there had been a balance due to the infant, the infant could have recovered. He had done the work, and could recover from the master upon the contract the wages due to him. What the Court had to consider was whether, under circumstances like these, the plaintiff could recover the balance of the money the defendant had received, and whether, in point of fact, the agreement was a beneficial one to the defendant. The object of the defendant in entering into the agreement was to earn his own subsistence, and under that agreement he actually did earn in the first instance 30s. a week, which, for a youth of that age, seemed to be very good wages. Then, from October to March, 1873, he drew between 50l. and 60l. He could not but consider it was a very beneficial agreement for the infant. He might in time do better, and he appeared to have done so. It seemed to him that the defendant was bound by the contract, which was a beneficial one at the time it was made, and he should find a verdict for the plaintiff for the full amount claimed.


Source: The Law Journal - 31st January 1874

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat May 06, 2017 7:15 am

PETER DES GRANGES

London


James Des Granges - (Journeyman)


Pursuant to the Act for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors in England.
THE COURT FOR RELIEF OF INSOLVENT DEBTORS.

The following PRISONERS, whose Estates and Effects have been vested in the Provisional Assignee by Order of the Court, having filed their Schedules, are ordered to be brought up before the Court, at the Court-House, in Portugal-Street, Lincoln’s-Inn-Fields, on Friday the 7th day of October 1842, at Nine o’Clock in the Forenoon, to be dealt with according to the Statute:

James Des Granges, formerly of Dyer's-buildings, Holborn, London, then of Northampton-square, Clerkenwell, then of Nelson-terrace, City-road, then of Little Queen-street, Holborn, then of Gray’s-inn-terrace, Gray's-inn-road, then of Wells-street, Oxford-street, then of No. 33, Exmouth-street, Clerkenwell, and late of Stanhope-street, Clare-market, all in Middlesex, Watch Maker, and occasionally Journeyman Watch Maker to Peter Des Granges, of No. 33, Cockspur-street, Charing-cross, Middlesex.


Source: The London Gazette - 16th September 1842

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed May 17, 2017 4:43 am

NEGRETTI & ZAMBRA

London


George Restall - (Manager)


Robbery At The Crystal Palace.—George Restall, a young man, who has been manager of the business—in the Crystal Palace—of Messrs. Negretti and Zambra, was charged with stealing thirteen lenses of the value of £60, the property of his employers.

Mr. H. Negretti deposed that the prisoner was employed by his partner and himself to conduct their business at the Crystal Palace, at a salary of £3 a week, and about a fortnight since he came to them and said he had missed as many as nineteen lenses from his stall in the palace, and mentioned the name of a party whom he suspected. He (witness) told him at once to communicate with the police at the palace; but instead of doing so, he gave information of the alleged robbery at Scotland-yard, giving as his reason that the police of the palace were too friendly with the suspected party. Three of the four lenses produced were the property of witness and his partner, and were a portion of those missing.

A shopman to Mr. Blizzard, pawnbroker, in the Borough, produced the four lenses, and said that they had been pledged with him by the prisoner, who described them as his own property.

Sergeant Palmer, a detective, said that about a fortnight ago he received instructions to make inquiries respecting thirteen lenses stolen from the Crystal Palace. He saw the prisoner on the subject, and in his account about the lenses, he said they were safe about three weeks ago, though in his information he mentioned that they had been gone six months. He asked him if he pawned them, or either of them, when he not only positively denied having done so, but declared he had never been in the shop of a pawnbroker in his life.

The prisoner, who denied the charge, was remanded to a future day.

On Tuesday last the case was again heard, when Mr. Sleigh appeared for the defendant, and Mr. Lewis, jun., for the prosecution.

Mr. Negretti said that since the last examination he discovered other lenses missing, and requested a further remand, to give time for tracing the other properly, and which, with that produced, was of the value of from £90 to £100.

Mr. Sleigh represented the prisoner as a person of high respectability, and, he felt quite sure, incapable of committing the offence attributed to him, and examined the witnesses at some length, after which the prisoner was again remanded, but admitted to bail.

We sincerely hope that at a future hearing Mr. Restall may be able to prove his innocence, as we know him to be a skilful photographer, and should be sorry to think him a dishonest one.


Source: The Photographic News - 2nd January 1863

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Sat May 20, 2017 5:55 am

BARBER & NORTH

York


John Burill - (Journeyman)


THE COURT FOR RELIEF OF INSOLVENT DEBTORS

The following prisoners, whose Estates and Effects have been vested in the Provisional Assignee by Order of the Court, having filed their Schedules, are ordered to be brought up before a Commissioner on Circuit, to be dealt with according to the Statute, as follows:

At the Court-House, at York, in the County of York, on the 21st day of June 1844, at Ten o’Clock in the Forenoon precisely.

John Burrill, late of Bilton-street, York, Journeyman Silversmith, then of Wilson-terrace, then of Waterloo-buildings, Spurrrier-gate, then of Dove-street, afterwards of Spurrier-gate aforesaid, in Lodgings, then of Dove-street, then of Davy-gate, and late of Peter-gate, all in York, Journeyman Silversmith, and Shareholder in the Yorkshire Agricultural and Commercial Banking Company, Ouse-gate, York.


Source: The London Gazette - 31st May 1844


John Burill was apprenticed to John Prince, Robert Cattle and George Cattle in 1809. He was appointed Assay Master at York in 1839. John Burill was famously described in a report by the London Wardens regarding the running of the York Assay Office as a "worn-out spoon-maker in the employ of Mr. Barber and evidently is, and always was, quite unfit for the employment of an assayer, being ignorant of the business to which he was appointed thirteen years since."

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Sat Jul 22, 2017 10:18 am

ROSENTHAL, ARONSON & Co.

Melbourne


David Rosenthal - (Partner) - (b. Russian Poland c. 1825, d. Melbourne 1910)
Saul Philip Aronson - (Partner) - (b. Bangor, Wales, c. 1845, d. London 1931)
George Alfred Aronson - (Partner) - (b. Bangor, Wales, c. 1848, d. London 1910).
Otto Brinkmann - (Manager and Working Jeweller)
Henry Hessels - (Die sinker, Designer and Toolmaker)
Arthur Dawes - (Diamond Setter)
Julius Haber - (Diamond Setter)
William Wylie - (Brooch Assembler and Marker)
August Adamske - (Goldsmith)
Bartholomew Herbstritt - (Goldsmith)
Edward Müller - (Engineer and Toolmaker)
John Coley - (Apprentice)

Other employees noted, but positions unknown:

Nuriel Aronson (Norman), Thomas J Flynn, WA Walton, John D Rosenthal, Ernest Hogarth, Snr & Jnr, J Hansen, R Wolffe, F Brienkman, Charles Wigg, Peter Scherwager, F Haber, J Johnstone, H Beyer, Henry Lange, F Tilley, Alf Stokes, F Parrish, William Parrish, Percy Wadleton, T Dennison, H Petersen, G Alexander and his son, C Jenkins, Fred Stannus, George Stott, Walter Walton, John Harris Marks (traveller), Mr Holtz (traveller), Mr J Lindsay, Thomas Morton, Gustav Paul Schober (known as George).


The above was complied using the research of Ruth Dwyer and taken from her excellent article ‘A Jewellery Manufactory in Melbourne: Rosenthal, Aronson & Company’ Published in Provenance: The Journal of Public Record Office Victoria, issue no. 7, 2008.

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:59 am

WILLIAM BATEMAN (I)

London


Richard Duncan - (Journeyman)


R. DUNCAN, WORKING SILVERSMITH, etc., (Late with Mr. Bateman, London, Silversmith to his present Majesty,) Begs most respectfully to inform the Noblility and Gentry of Carlisle and its Vicinity, that he has commenced working at the above Business.

Source: Carlisle Journal - 3rd August 1833

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=38974&p=146270&hilit=Duncan#p146270

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Sat Dec 23, 2017 3:21 pm

MAPPIN & WEBB

London and Sheffield


Henry Lewis Slaughter
George Hurry
Reginald Ward
Arthur Hatfield

Personnel mentioned as having been employed by Mappin & Webb Ltd. include Henry Lewis Slaughter, many years with the firm's Oxford Street branch, who died on 17th January 1902; George Hurry, a commercial traveller employed by Mappin & Webb for thirty-two years, who at the age of 57 committed suicide on 1st May 1903 by throwing himself under a train at Portland Road Railway Station, Reginald Ward who after 48 years' service retired as the firm's cutlery manager in Sheffield in 1931, and A. Hatfield, head designer at the Royal Works, who died aged 63 on 3rd July 1935.

Source: The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers & Allied Traders 1838-1914 - John Culme

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:44 pm

HAWES & SON

London


John Robert Gray - (Assistant)

Mr. John Robert Gray, assistant to Messrs. Hawes & Son, 14 Cranbourne Street, jewelers, said that in December last he sold a watch to a person giving the name of George Bidwell, and the address 7 Upper Gloucester Place. The same person called again on January 29th, when witness sold him a brilliant ring for 100 guineas. He paid with a bank-note for £100 and £5 in gold. He also sold him a carbuncle and diamond set for 50 guineas. He paid that sum in gold. The same day witness paid the £100 note into his masters' account at the City Bank. He afterwards saw the jewelry that he had sold to George Bidwell at the Mansion House, and he identified it.

Mr. Walter Weston Goss, cashier at the Bond Street branch of the City Bank, deposed that Messrs. Hawes & Son, jewelers, kept an account there, and on January 29th a £100 bank-note was paid into the credit of their account.


Source: Forging His Chains: The Autobiography of George Bidwell, the Famous Ticket-of-leave Man. - George Bidwell - 1890

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=30091&p=152157&hilit=hawes#p152157

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 21, 2018 5:45 am

JOHN INNOCENT

London


Thomas Grant - (Journeyman Silversmith)

See: viewtopic.php?f=74&t=23402

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 26, 2018 1:59 pm

GEORGE CARSTAIRS

Edinburgh


William Cooper Carstairs - (Son and Apprentice)
George Crichton - (Apprentice) - Indentured 15th December 1862
John Campbell Short - (Apprentice) - Indentured 12th August 1862
William Brown Dowie - (Apprentice) - Indentured 19th January 1866

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 22, 2018 5:56 am

DEYKIN & SONS - DEYKIN & HARRISON

Birmingham


Frank Smith - (Worker in the spoon and fork department)

P.W. Harrison, managing director, stated in 1936 that they still had in their employ one Frank Smith who had started with them in February 1863, thereby showing 73 years' service. During almost all this time he had been in the spoon and fork department.

Source: The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers & Allied Traders 1838-1914 - John Culme (Sourced from 'The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith' - March 1936)

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 19, 2018 4:08 am

SAMUEL USHER Ltd.

Birmingham


Joseph Hyde - (Porter and Stamper)


TRANSPOSING HALL-MARKS

A CHESTER ASSAY OFFICE PROSECUTION


On Friday morning Jos. Hyde, 32, a porter, pleaded guilty at Birmingham Assizes to transposing a certain mark of a die provided and used by the Company of Goldsmiths of the City of Chester, from divers wares of gold to others, to wit, thirteen gold bangle rings. He also pleaded guilty to another indictment charging him with the theft of 10dwt. of gold on February 29, 1908, 10dwt. on March 28, 1808, and 10dwt. on July 4, 1908, the property of his masters, Samuel Usher, Ltd. - Mr. Paifitt, K.C., and Mr. Maddocks prosecuted on behalf of the Chester Assay Office, and Mr. Norris Footer appeared for the prisoner.

Mr. Parfitt said the case was not an ordinary one, and he spoke of the serious nature of the first offence. The Assayers were appointed at various places in order to prevent, as far as possible, frauds and abuses in the marking of gold and silver wares. In substance, the offence was the transposition of hall-marks, or the removal of them from one ring to another. Prisoner had been employed for some eleven years by Messrs. Samuel Usher, Ltd., who had initials of their own, and also kept punches bearing the initials of customers for whom they made rings. Prisoner became a sort of confidential servant in their employment, and it was his duty to prepare strips of go!d to be sent to the Assay Office. He had full access to the stocks of gold and to the punches. In July it was found that a number of gold bangle rings bearing the transposed mark of the Chester Assay Office were in circulation at various places. The matter was put into the hands of Detective-Inspector Goldrick, and, said Mr. Parfitt, the Chester Assay Office wished publicly to acknowledge the great help both the inspector and certain pawnbrokers had been to them in the matter. Counsel pointed out that was not so much a question of the value of the gold as the fact that if such offences were carried on on a large scale the public would begin to think that the hall-mark could not be relied upon. When arrested by Detective-Inspector Goldrick, prisoner admitted having transposed the marks and taken the gold from the shop. He had been driven to do it, he said, in consequence of doctor's bills incurred through his wife's illness. Counsel said the Chester Assay Office did not wish to press for a vindictive sentence, but as a public body they felt the facts ought to be placed before his lordship.

Mr. Norris Foster said prisoner had previously borne a good character. Evidence was called as to prisoner's previous good character.

Mr. Justice Sutton said that the offence was a most serious one. In the interests of the public it was essential that hall-marks should not be tampered with, but should be relied upon. In consideration of his good character, the accused was sentenced only to nine months' hard labour.


Source: The Chester Courant - 9th December 1908

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Fri Apr 20, 2018 12:54 pm

STOKES & IRELAND

Birmingham


..... Gotch - (Silversmith)


ROBBERY OF £800 WORTH OF SILVER

At Birmingham, on Monday, a silversmith named Gotch was charged with stealing 48oz. of silver, value £800, the property of his employers, Messrs. Stokes and Ireland. It had been entrusted to him, and be pretended he had been robbed or it. He was remanded for a previous conviction to be proved.


Source: Monmouthshire Merlin - 28th December 1883

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Re: Some Known Journeymen Silversmiths and Other Employees

Postby dognose » Sat Apr 21, 2018 2:18 pm

EDWARD EDMUNDS

Birmingham


Thomas Foreman


MISLEADING A BURGLAR

An attempt at burglary in the Birmingham jewellery quarter on Wednesday night was neatly frustrated by the smartness of Thomas Foreman, an employe of Mr. Edward Edmunds, silversmith, of Warstone-lane.

Foreman was making his nightly round of the works, accompanied by his little boy, when, looking up at the roof, he saw a man's feet resting against the water spout.

"Well", he remarked to the boy, "it seems all right; we'll go home." He then left the yard and communicated with the police.

Three constables took up stations around the factory, and two men were arrested. They were taken before the magistrates yesterday and committed for trial.


Source: Evening Express - 21st August 1908

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