Early New Zealand Silversmiths

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Mar 23, 2013 3:28 pm

HOGG, BEAVER, & HISLOP

Princes Street and Rattray Street, Dunedin

HOGG, BEAVER, & HISLOP, WATCHMAKERS & JEWELLERS, Princes-street, And at Rattray-street, Opposite J. Brown's new buildings, now erecting and in close proximity to the Jetty and Public Offices. H. B. & H. beg respectfully to solicit an inspection of their magnificent stock of Gold and Siiver Watches, English, Foreign, and Colonial Jewellery, Clocks, Time Pieces, &c, &c. Watches, chronometers, time pieces, repaired and guaranteed at moderate charges. Colonial gold made into brooches, rings, &c, to order, in the most artistic style.

Source: Otago Daily Times - 31st July 1862

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Mar 26, 2013 4:00 pm

BEAVER & BARNETT

Thames Street, Oamaru

WATCHMAKERS, JEWELLERS, &c. BEAVER AND BARNETT beg to call the attention of their numerous constituents to their beautifully assorted Stock of Watches, Chains, Brooches, Bracelets, Earrings, Wedding and Signet Rings, Breast Pins, Plate, Clocks, &c, which they have in great variety. B. & B. are in a position to supply all the above named goods considerably cheaper, and better in quality, than any other house in the district, being DIRECT IMPORTERS from the home market, Supplies of which they are in receipt of per every EUROPEAN MAIL. The Watchmaking and Manufacturing Jewellery department is entrusted to experienced and fully competent workmen, so that all favors in that branch entrusted to their charge will receive the most strict exactness and punctuality. Up-country customers having any repairs to execute, will please transmit same to them per postal packet, addressed to private box, No. 29, which favors will receive quick despatch, and returned free of transit charge.
BEAVER & BARNETT, WATCHMAKERS, SILVERSMITHS, AND JEWELLERS, Opposite the Post-office, Thames-street, Oamaru. N.B. Watches and Clocks rated by transit observation. A splendid assortment of Masonic Clothing always on hand.


Source: North Otago Times - 22nd September 1868

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue May 07, 2013 1:30 pm

GOLDSTEIN & MOLLER

Princes Street, Dunedin

Messrs. Goldstein & Moller have become the purchasers of the jewellery establishment lately carried on by Messrs. Harrop and Neill in Princes-street, Dunedin. The stock is a very fine one, and contains an unrivalled selection of silver and electro-plated ware, as well as gold and silver watches, and all the other articles included in the trade. The famous machinery also, which enabled the late owners to execute in such good style cups and medals, and other matters pertaining to their art, has been acquired by the firm alluded to, so that they are prepared to furnish everything connected with the jeweller's and silversmith's calling, manufactured with the utmost taste, and at the most reasonable prices.

Source: New Zealand Tablet - 22nd June 1877


WATCHMAKERS. THE undersigned having purchased the Stock-in-trade, of Messrs Harrop and Neill, Watchmakers and Jewellers, at a great reduction on the original cost, beg to intimate to the public that they are now in a position to offer the whole of the above stock, which has been personally selected by Mr Harrop in the Home market, AT PRICES WHICH DEFY COMPETITION. They respectfully solicit an inspection of their magnificent stock of SILVER and ELECTRO-PLATED WARE, GOLD and SILVER WATCHES, and every other requisite connected with the Jewellry and Watchmaking business. Having also acquired the splendid machinery brought out from Home by Mr Harrop, and being thoroughly practical workmen, they are prepared to execute all orders for Cups, Medals, Trophies, Jewels, and Jewellery to any design or pattern,, with the utmost despatch and care, and trust by strict attention to all orders entrusted to them, to merit a continuance of the patronage so liberally bestowed upon their predecessors. GOLDSTEIN & MOLLER, Manufacturing Jewellers, Gold and Silversmiths, Late of Rattray-street, Successors to HARROP & NEILL, Watchmakers, Jewellers, and Silversmiths, Princes-street. EVERY DESCRIPTION OF JEWELLERY REPAIRED OR MADE TO ORDER. All kinds of Chronometers, Repeaters, Watches, Clocks, Barometers Nautical, Surveying, and Mathematical Instruments, &c, Cleaned, Repaired, and Adjusted. – The Watch and Clock Department is now under the supervision of Mr. Neill. WE HAVE much pleasure in recommending Messrs GOLDSTEIN & MOLLER to our Customers, and solicit continuance of their patronage so liberally bestowed upon ourselves. HARROP & NEILL.

Source: New Zealand Tablet - 26th April 1878


DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP AND EXPIRATION OF LEASE. Messrs. GOLDSTEIN & MOLLER, beg to intimate that, owing to dissolution of partnership and expiration of lease, they are now selling off the whole of their large and well-assorted stock of watches, clocks, and jewellery at enormous reductions. To enable them to realise by the beginning of July, they are now selling at and under cost price, as partnership accounts have to be adjusted by that date. All outstanding accounts are respectfully requested to be paid by that date, and all accounts against the firm to be rendered for settlement. GOLDSTEIN & MOLLER, Watchmakers and Jewellers, Princes Street.

Source: New Zealand Tablet - 7 November 1879

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed May 15, 2013 2:39 pm

HEINRICH KOHN

Queen Street, Auckland

HEINRICH KOHN, JEWELLER, QUEEN STREET, AUCKLAND, Begs to draw the attention of the public to his Large and Well-assorted Stock of ENGLISH, FOREIGN, AND COLONIAL MANUFACTURED JEWELLERY, Specially selected, and of the Newest Styles and Designs. A large portion of the above consist of Quartz and Greenstone Jewellery, Manufactured on the premises. H. K. begs specially to draw the attention of the public to his LARGE AND SUPERIOR STOCK OF GOLD AND SILVER WATCHES, AND GREAT VARIETY OF SILVER AND PLATED GOODS, Which are of the best known manufactures of the home markets. Note the address HEINRICH KOHN, JEWELLER, QUEEN STREET.

Source: Auckland Star - 8th February 1873


WANTED, a respectable Boy at H, Kohn's, Queen-street.

Source: Auckland Star - 17th July 1876


LOST, a few days ago, between Eden Crescent and Queen-street, a Gold Trinket from a Lady's Albert Chain.–Five shillings reward paid to anyone returning same to Mr. H. Kohn, Queen-street.

Source: Auckland Star - 19th October 1878


.......4th Prize.– Lady's Beautiful Dress King, of gold set with precious stones, manufactured specially for the drawing by Mr H. ,Kohn, jeweller. Queen-street. The ring is now on exhibition in Queen-street, and only requires to be seen to be coveted.

Source: Observer - 9th September 1893


Perhaps to be identified with this later business, noted in 1927 and 1933:

Image
A. Kohn Ltd. - Auckland - 1933

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Jun 08, 2013 11:32 am

F.H. LEWISSON

Queen Street, Auckland

James Mitchell, a workman late in the employment of Mr. F. H. Lewisson, jeweller and watchmaker, was brought before his Worship yesterday upon remand, and committed to take his trial at the next criminal session of the Supreme Court, for stealing a gold chain and seals, two silver watches, an opera glass, and two silver watches, total value £26.

Source: New Zealand Herald - 5th October 1865

WHO has kept constantly at work all through the bad times. Two Working Jewellers making up Colonial Jewellery Why, F. H. LEWISSON.
WHO has kept constantly at work two Workmen cutting Greenstone and Thames Quartz ?–Why, F. H. LEWISSON.
WHO has the largest and only assortment of Quartz Brooches, Earrings, Pins, Studs, and Sleeve Links Why, F. H. LEWISSON.
WHO has always on hand Quartz Specimens for sale Why, F. H. LEWISSON.
WHO has the largest assortment of Greenstone Drops, Earrings, Breast Pins, Studs, Sleeve Links, &c, &c, &c. F–Why, F. H. LEWISSON, Manufacturer of Greenstone and Quartz Jewellery.
WHO can't pay his debts, having overstocked himself with Colonial Jewellery -Why, F. H. LEWISSON.
Then come and help him out and give him a turn, if you have any money. Highest price charged and abatement made.


Source: Auckland Star - 20th February 1871

Should this catch the eye of any one in want of one of Rotherham'a very best Gold Hunting Levers, capped, extra jewelled, and of the very best quality, either lady's or gent's, be can be supplied by F. H. Lewisson, Jeweller, Queen-street, opposite the Union Bank. Price lady's, £20 gent's, £25.

Source: Daily Southern Cross - 26th April 1872

DEATHS
LEWISSON.–On December 14, at Wood-street, Ponsonby, F. H. Lewlsson, jeweller, Queen-street, aged 57, funeral will leave his late residence today/Thursday), at two o'clock, for Wikomiti. Friends please accept this Invitation.


Source: New Zealand Herald - 15th December 1887

F.H. Lewisson established his business at Auckland in 1861.

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 18, 2013 10:58 am

GEORGE McGREGOR

Queen Street, Auckland

JEWELS AND PRESENTS RARE. GEORGE MCGREGOR'S FINE STOCK. To choose-a Xmas present may be the greatest pleasure or merely an exasperating experience. To find what one wants, and to be sure of the acceptability of the gift to one's friend, is to have achieved the desire of one's heart at Christmastide. This ideal may be attained by visiting Mr. Geo. McGregor, Jeweller, Queen-street. The intending giver will thus have the satisfaction oi knowing that his token of goodwill at Yuletide will be just as much in evidence many years hence as'an emblem of friendship, as on the day it first gives pleasure. The genuine quality of Mr. McGregor's goods and their attractive design speak for themselves. Everything is marked in plain figures, and arranged with an artistic neatness that prevents the sense of injury one so frequently feels on seeing something one likes better, than the thing just bought. Silverware, in enticing varieties of design, covering aids to toilet, table requisites, trinket sets, and silver-backed mirrors, is tastefully displayed in charming profusion. Hatpins have their own section, and some of the silver heads are unique in pattern and charm. Moderate priced gifts of sterling quality are to be found in the mosaic and enamel departments, from the mystic "swastika." (or good-luck cross), to the costliest example of enamel workmanship. Enamelled brooches are much in evidence, the dainty designs being remarkably neat and effective. In higher quality stock the goods displayed by Mr. McGregor are on a par with anything in Auckland, the chaste examples of the goldsmith's art in rings. brooches, charms, and bangles, forming a most pleasing array. The most scrupulous taste may find expression in the choice of the moderate priced articles, and to the connoisseur in gems and settings the richly mounted ruby, sapphire, and diamond rings and brooches afford a wide field for selection. Engagement rings are a specialty with Mr. McGregor, the delicately-mounted jewels appearing in a variety of settings, which afford a numerous and attractive series of styles from which to select. A special feature of the firm is the reliable quality of tho watches it supplies. They are displayed in wristlet form, as solid, double-cased hunters, and in ladies' bijou models, with every novelty in the way of chains and guards. No Christmas selection of jewellery would be complete without an assortment' of bangles. These are to bo found in hundreds, from the plain gold band to the most exquisitely chased wrist adornments, rich with gems. The whole stock on view, which only forms a small part of that in hand, is brilliantly lit both day and night, and purchasers may rest content that the goods will stand microscopic scrutiny.

Source: New Zealand Herald - 17th December 1912

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 18, 2013 12:07 pm

PERCY J. BAILEY

Ridgway Street, later, Victoria Avenue, Wanganui

That there is no need to go away from Wanganui for the best specimens of the silversmith's art is evident after an inspection of a magnificent trophy, now on view in the window of Mr. M. H. Wilton, chemist, Avenue. The trophy is the work of Mr. Percy J. Bailey of Ridgway Street. It is in the form of a challenge shield, which has been presented to the Feilding Agricultural Association by Mr Jas. Campion, of Okirae, for' the exhibitor scoring most points in Romney sheep. The shield is unusually large, being 3ft. 6in. by 2ft. 6in., and is oblong in shape. The groundwork is of oak, which has been treated by the fuming process, and is splendidly carved in oak foliage, this portion of the work having been turned out at Mr R. W. Green's woodwork factory. Surmounting the upper edge of the shield is the figure of a Romney ram in solid silver, and underneath is a 15-in-long silver plate, on which a farm scene is engraved, the detail having been brought out cleverly and clearly. The centre of the shield is occupied by a large burnished plate of silver, bearing the necessary inscription, and flanking this is a female figure in embossed silver, holding a laurel wreath, in the centre of which is the monogram F.A.A. in raised silver letters. The work in the figure is very fine, the detail having received great attention, and, being in relief, it is very striking. Above this axe the words "Challenge Shield" in bold letters of burnished copper, while burnished silver name plates surround the centre piece. The workmanship and taste throughout! are' of the highest class, and reflect very great credit on Mr. Bailey, who has proved himself a silversmith of no mean order. The shield has attracted a great deal of attention, and the Feilding Agricultural Association is to be complimented on the possession of so valuable and handsome a trophy.

Source: Wanganui Herald - 27th April 1908


BUSINESS NOTES
A CHANGE OF ADDRESS. No lady's outfit is complete without a certain amount of good jewellery, while even the slerner sex do not disdain the aid which it lends to their appearance. Men and women will, therefore, read with interest an inset in this issue, notifying that Mr Percy J. Bailey has moved from Ridgway Street to the Avenue (next Clothing Factory). Mr Bailey has a high reputation as a diamond setter and engraver, while he is a specialist in the manufacture of trophies, as evidenced by the magnificent shield which he lately turned out for the Feilding A. and P. Association. Thorough workmanship and finish and artistic design are guaranteed by Mr Bailey, whose orders for the future should not be lacking in quantity, considering the satisfaction he is known to give to his clients. Note the address: Percy J. Bailey, jeweller and diamond setter, Victoria Avenue (next Clothing Factory).


Source: Wanganui Herald - 4th May 1908


QUALITY JEWELLERY
MR. PERCY J. BAILEY
Of the many jewellery firms carrying on business in Wanganui and surrounding districts none enjoys a higher reputation for sterling value and honest workmanship than Mr Percy J. Bailey, of 54 the Avenue. All who contemplate making Christmas gifts this year–and who does not? –should make a point of inspecting Mr Bailey's large stock of high grade jewellery. Here will be found a comprehensive display of modern jewellery to suit all tastes and all pockets. Diamond, ruby, emerald, and sapphire rings, brooches and bangles of every conceivable design, watches, clocks, E.P. ware and novelties of every description offer a selection that cannot fail to meet every demand. Mr Bailey has a reputation for being the cheapest jeweller in town and this certainly redounds to his credit when one considers the high quality of the stock he carries. A stroll through this popular jewellery establishment should be made by all in search of suggestions for suitable Christmas presents.


Source: Wanganui Chronicle - 22nd December 1919

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Jan 16, 2014 2:48 pm

W. SKEATES

138, Queen Street, Auckland


Image
W. Skeates - Auckland - 1888

Established 1861. Late F.H. Lewisson.

This appears to be the continuation of F.H. Lewisson's business (see earlier post), as he died on the 14th December 1887.


Image
W. Skeates - Auckland - 1892

As can be seen from the above advertisement, Skeates held the sole agency for New Zealand for the products of Mappin & Webb.

By 1894 Skeates had relocated to 94, Queen Street, Auckland.

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 19, 2014 3:12 pm

H.A. NIELSON & SON

The Auckland Steam Electro-Gold, Silver, Nickel-Plating, and Lapidary Works, Masefield's Buildings, Albert Street, and 234, Queen Street, Auckland


Image
H.A. Nielson & Son - Auckland - 1894

Messrs H. A. Nielson and Son, of the Auckland steam and electro plating works, have disposed of the business to a local firm, having decided to retire from the electro-platng on gold, silver, nickel, copper, brass, bronze, and lacquer for which they were awarded seven special gold medals at the Auckland Industrial Exhibition, and one special gold medal for the best exhibit. During the ten years they have carried on the electro plating in Auckland they have had many large and difficult pieces of work, which have stood the test of years. The new firm have secured the services of Mr D. E. Nielson as manager, and all work left in their hands will no doubt have the attention and first-class workmanship.

Source: The Auckland Star - 13th May 1899

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Jan 26, 2014 8:12 am

JAMES PRINCE

Victoria Street East, Auckland


Image
James Prince - Auckland - 1894

James Samuel Prince was born in 1866 at Mt Eden. His father, also named James, was a jeweller and watchmaker with a shop located at South Street, Newton. James took over the family business and relocated it to Victoria Street East. He was the manufacturer of many of the jewels for freemasons lodges in Auckland. A mason himself, he was initiated into the Prince of Wales’ Lodge in 1892 and served as Master in 1899.

James married Emily Jane Kirkland in 1896 and they had three sons, Eric, Alan and Verner.

James Samuel Prince died at home of a heart attack in 1921, aged 54.

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 08, 2014 8:13 am

GEORGE LUMSDEN

Tay Street, Invercargill


Image
George Lumsden c.1875


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Geo. Lumsden - Invercargill - 1866

George Lumsden was born at Fife, Scotland, in 1815. He learned the trade from his uncle* a Watchmaker at Pittenweem, Fife. Around 1836 he went to Edinburgh, and worked for James Whitelaw, a Watchmaker of that city, with whom he remained for some years before starting on his own account at Edinburgh. He married Christina Anderson, by whom he had eight children, in 1842 and in 1858 emigrated to Geelong, Australia, on board the Ravenseraig and set up business in that town. Like many others, he took part in the gold rush at Ballarat, but returned to his business in Geelong. In 1861 they relocated to Invercargill, New Zealand. George Lumsden was elected Mayor of Invercargill in 1873—1874 and 1878—1879. In between those dates he served as a Member of Parliament for Invercargill from 1875 to 1878, but resigned from that position to attend to his business. He died on the 11th February 1904.

* Almost certainly George Lumsden, see: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=31210&p=87415&hilit=lumsden#p87415

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 22, 2014 4:53 am

PITCHER

Hawera


New Zealand

A shockingly sudden death occurred at Hawera on Saturday, 15th instant, under peculiar circumstances. Robert M'Leod, aged 16 years, was playing cricket, when he was struck on the head by a ball hit by a batsman. At the time he said he was not hurt. He returned to the shop of Mr. Pitcher, jeweller, of whom he was an apprentice, and took charge of the shop for an hour, performing his ordinary duties, and afterwards went home to bed. He was then taken seriously ill. He became unconscious, and died in two or three hours.


Source: The Sydney Mail - 28th November 1885

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Aug 12, 2014 3:02 pm

SAMUEL GEORGE ROSS

Wellington


Tuesday, 26TH SEPTEMBER, 1905.
The Committee met at 7.30 pm. pursuant to notice.
Present: Hon. Mr. Thompson (Chairman), Hon. Mr. Beehan, Hon. Mr. Carncross, Hon. Mr. Feldwick, Hon. Mr. Fraser, Hon. Mr. Jenkinson, Hon. Mr. Pinkerton, Hon. Mr. Pitt, Hon. Mr. Rigg, Hon. Mr. Stevens, Hon. Mr. Trask.
Minutes of previous meeting read and confirmed.
Shops and Offices Act Amendment Bill.
A letter from the New Zealand Shopkeepers’ Association read.
A deputation of forty-eight shopkeepers of Wellington, representing the New Zealand Shopkeepers' Association, was received, and the following members of the deputation were examined and the evidence reported: Henry Frederick Allen, secretary of association (No.26); Herbert Hazel Seaton, Chairman of association (No. 27); Edward Joseph Walsh, draper (No. 28); William Thomas Quinton, mercer (No. 29); Thomas O'Brien, bootmaker (No. 30) ; Edwin Ellis, general dealer (No. 31) ; Florence Louisa Kilfoy, grocer and confectioner (No. 32) ; Samuel George Ross, jeweller and engraver (No. 33); Edgar Jones, vice-president of association (No. 34) ; Lucy Penlington, dressmaker and milliner (No. 35); Albert Edward Mann, bootmaker (No.36); and Stuart Robinson, jeweller and silversmith (No. 37). Gerald Turner, tea-dealer (No 38), was also examined and the evidence reported.
The Committee then adjourned.


Source: Journals of the Legislative Council of the Dominion of New Zealand - New Zealand Parliament - 1905

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Aug 12, 2014 3:04 pm

STUART ROBINSON

Willis Street, Wellington


Image
Robinson's - Wellington - 1901


Tuesday, 26TH SEPTEMBER, 1905.
The Committee met at 7.30 pm. pursuant to notice.
Present: Hon. Mr. Thompson (Chairman), Hon. Mr. Beehan, Hon. Mr. Carncross, Hon. Mr. Feldwick, Hon. Mr. Fraser, Hon. Mr. Jenkinson, Hon. Mr. Pinkerton, Hon. Mr. Pitt, Hon. Mr. Rigg, Hon. Mr. Stevens, Hon. Mr. Trask.
Minutes of previous meeting read and confirmed.
Shops and Offices Act Amendment Bill.
A letter from the New Zealand Shopkeepers’ Association read.
A deputation of forty-eight shopkeepers of Wellington, representing the New Zealand Shopkeepers' Association, was received, and the following members of the deputation were examined and the evidence reported: Henry Frederick Allen, secretary of association (No.26); Herbert Hazel Seaton, Chairman of association (No. 27); Edward Joseph Walsh, draper (No. 28); William Thomas Quinton, mercer (No. 29); Thomas O'Brien, bootmaker (No. 30) ; Edwin Ellis, general dealer (No. 31) ; Florence Louisa Kilfoy, grocer and confectioner (No. 32) ; Samuel George Ross, jeweller and engraver (No. 33); Edgar Jones, vice-president of association (No. 34) ; Lucy Penlington, dressmaker and milliner (No. 35); Albert Edward Mann, bootmaker (No.36); and Stuart Robinson, jeweller and silversmith (No. 37). Gerald Turner, tea-dealer (No 38), was also examined and the evidence reported.
The Committee then adjourned.


Source: Journals of the Legislative Council of the Dominion of New Zealand - New Zealand Parliament - 1905

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Nov 09, 2014 1:38 pm

ROTHSCHILD, JACOB & Co.

Wellington


Several Birmingham firms are interested in the affairs of Mr. Isidor Rothschild, of Wellington, New Zealand, who is endeavouring to make some arrangement with his creditors. Mr. Rothschild was formerly a member of the firm Rothschild, Jacob and Co., and it is rather a curious coincidence that news of Mr. Jacobs' death has just been cabled over.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st March 1894

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Dec 02, 2014 11:12 am

J. & M. HYAMS

Dee Street, Invercargill


Image
J. & M. Hyams - Invercargill - 1866

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Dec 08, 2014 7:22 am

JIM COTTERILL

ARTHUR MORRISON

Wellington


Image

Image


Member Elly wrote:

The intertwined J C mark stands for Jim Cotterill, a Wellington, New Zealand jeweler who died in 1953. The paua shell fork was produced by Arthur Morrison, an early pioneer of paua shell souvenirs who produced paua shell jewellery for Jim Cotterill's shop from c. 1943. Paua shell manufacturing was a licensed activity from 1946 until 1960 to protect the interests of disabled ex-servicemen in New Zealand who were involved in paua shell jewellery making. Arthur Morrison did not hold a licence whereas Jim Cotterill did so Morrison sold his paua shell goods through Cotterill's jewellery shop.

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 09, 2015 12:58 pm

D. BENJAMIN & Co.

Royal Terrace, and Dowling Street, Dunedin


Amongst the list of passengers per 'Araira', just arrived from New Zealand, we noticed the name of Mr. D. E. Theomin, head of the old-established house of D. Benjamin and Co., wholesale jewellers and importers, Dunedin, so well-known to manufacturers under the mark "500." Mr. Theomin's London address is care of Messrs. Michaelis, Hallenstein and Co., 17 and 18, Basinghall-street, E.C.

Source: The Watchmaker, Jeweller and Silversmith - 1st May 1891

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Jan 09, 2015 3:19 pm

ALFRED REYNOLDS - HERMAN PENZHALZ - JOHN AYRES - C. GOODWIN - J. EDWARDS - D. GARNIER - HENRY PETRY - DAVID KEENE - SEYMOUR WELLS - F.G. SINGLETON - J.F. NUILETZ - ANT. TEUTENBERG - BAXTER (Dunedin)

Auckland

New Zealand Parliament - House of Representatives - Reports of Select Committees

N0. 112. Mr. A. REYNOLDS and Others, Jewellers, to Mr. Commissioner Tinne:,– Auckland, 24th March, 1880.

Sir,

I beg most respectfully to bring to your notice the following facts in connection with in trade as lapidary, and with the trade of manufacturing jewellers. I commenced business in Auckland) thirteen years ago as lapidary, for the purpose of manufacturing the greenstone of New Zealand into articles of jewellery; for some years it kept many men employed by the manufacturing jewellers, who used every exertion to meet the increasing demand, and with success. About three years ago a certain merchant‘s house in Dunedin sent to England a block of greenstone in the rough, where it was cut and mounted and returned to this country; and this led to the complete ruin of the trade here–so much so that none of the trade are now able to employ a single band, and several have been compelled to relinquish business and leave the place. I place the foregoing facts before you in the hope that the Royal Commission may be induced to take into consideration the present state of the manufacturing jewellery trade and the means best calculated to effect an improvement. If I might be permitted to offer a suggestion, I would say that the case would be met by the imposition of such a duty as would prove prohibitive to the importation of manufactured greenstone articles. I do not think that a duty of less than 100 per cent. would be of any use in bringing about the result we desire. I am the more bold to make this suggestion, as I feel that the imposition of any amount of duty on articles of such manufacture will fall only upon those who are in a good position to pay it. Any further information you may require I shall be most happy to supply.
I have, &c.,

Alf. Reynolds.
Herman Penzhalz.
John Ayres.
C. Goodwin.
J. Edwards.
D. Garnier.
Henry Petry.
David Keane.
Seymour Wells.
F. G. Singleton.
J. F. Nuiletz.


No. 113. Mr. A. REYNOLDS and Others, Jewellers, to the Chairman of the Local Industries Commission – Auckland, 14th April, 1880.

Sir,

We have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your circular of 10th inst, through T. F. S. Tinne, Esq., in answer to which we beg to enclose a copy of a communication sent to the Auckland Chamber of Commerce, and beg to offer the following information and suggestions: We would ask for a 100- per-cent. duty on manufactured jewellery, and would request special attention to the working of New Zealand stones, such as greenstone, quartz, etc. We would also suggest that the following articles should be allowed to come in duty-free : Gallery-machine Work of gold in the rough, jeweller’s and lapidary's tools and materials. The demand in New Zealand being so limited that it would not warrant any one in laying down the costly machinery necessary for their production, and as they are required in the manufacturing here, it would aid in the establishment of the industry to admit them free. Trusting that you may consider these suggestions worthy of your consideration,
We have, &c.,

Alf. Reynolds.
D. Garnier.
Herman Penzhalz.
Ant. Teutenberg.
Seymour Wells.
John Ayres.
C. Goodwin.





No. 114. Messrs. A. Reynolds and C. Goodwin, Jewellers, to the Auckland Chamber of Commerce (forwarded to the Commissioners on Local Industries) – Auckland, 6th April, 1880.

Gentlemen

In answer to your invitation, we beg to lay before you the following facts in connection with the manufacturing-jewellery trade : The manufacture of greenstone and quartz jewellery assumed considerable importance in this city, employing a number of hands. Capital was invested, and machinery introduced, and there was every appearance of establishing a trade that would be a permanent benefit to this city and province. About three years ago a merchant's house in Dunedin sent to Europe stone in the rough state to be cut and mounted, which has led to the complete ruin of the trade here, it being found impossible to compete with the prices at which they are enabled to sell. As you invite suggestions, we would propose the imposition of such a duty as will prove prohibitive to the importation of manufactured jewellery, and are of opinion that no less a duty than 100 per cent. will avail anything. We are aware that 100 per cent. seems a very large duty to ask for; but, wherever in Europe ours is an old-established industry, machinery and other appliances are so perfected that production is accomplished by means of boy and girl labour, and at a price that precludes us from making ours a New Zealand industry, unless in the early stage of our efforts a large duty such as we ask for is imposed. No doubt, when this industry is thoroughly established here, and appliances perfected, a much smaller duty will be sufficient. The question now is, shall we make the trade of a working jeweller a New Zealand industry, by fostering it in its infancy to the necessary extent, or shall we prevent its establishment by withholding the necessary fostering measures?
We have, &c.,

Alf. Reynolds
C. Goodwin,
(for the trade.)


No. 115. Evidence of Messrs. A. Reynolds and Seymour Watts before Messrs. Commissioners Tinne and Burns, at Auckland, 30th April, 1880.

My name is Alfred Reynolds, lapidary, residing in Albert Street, Auckland. I have been in business as a lapidary thirteen years in Auckland. Referring to my letter and complaint therein stated, I and the working jewellers request certain alterations in the Customs tariff on jewellery to the extent of 100 per cent. This is asked for as a matter of trade, and, if the importation of manufactured jewellery continues, the trade will be ruined here, if it is not so in fact now. The amount realized from the sale of jewellery manufactured in Auckland used to be between £300 and £400 per week, the greater portion of this being greenstone jewellery. This trade is now nearly extinct. A number of hands were employed at this trade ; they are now idle. I think, if a duty were imposed, the consumer would not pay any more for the article than at present, as I know that a gold chain was sold lately for £7 10s. per ounce. Whilst I am aware that the same chain could be made in Auckland and sold for £6 10s. per ounce. The difficulty is with the shopkeepers: they are able to import and sell cheaper than we can manufacture, and they have a larger profit on the imported article, but the consumer does not purchase any cheaper. [At this stage Mr. Seymour Wells, a manufacturing jeweller, entered the room, and gave evidence along with Mr. Reynolds] The trade is unable to compete with the importer at present without an import duty, as the jewellery in other countries is principally made by children at very low rates ; but we are well aware that the consumer does not derive any benefit from the imported article over the article manufactured in the colony; in fact, the consumer very often pays a higher price for an inferior imported article.

ALFRED REYNOLDS, Lapidary. SEYMOUR WELLS, Jeweller and Assayer.



No. 116. Evidence of Mr. Baxter, Jeweller, Dunedin, before the Commissioners on Local Industries, at Dunedin, 18th May, 1880.

I May say, gentlemen, that I have been fifty years in the jewellery business, and I have never seen the trade in the state it has been here during the last three years. We have, in fact, nothing to do. Indeed, even medals, or anything of that kind required by Agricultural societies, are not given to the manufacturing jewellers in the place to make, but are sent Home for, either to England or Scotland. With your permission I will read you a short statement of our grievances;

The working jewellers of Dunedin would respectfully submit the following facts for your consideration :–

1. That there are at present fifteen master-jewellers in Dunedin who have machinery to employ at least forty hands; but, owing to the low tariff imposed, it is at present lying idle, while a large number of men are unemployed.

2. That nearly all apprentices go to Melbourne (where there is a protective tariff of 25 per cent.) when out of their time, and readily obtain employment.

3. A considerable quantity of jewellery is imported from Victoria, manufactured there.

4:. Previous to protection being introduced into Victoria (1866) there were only twenty jewellers employed, and two years after there were 120 on the rolls of the Society.

5. Large quantities of greenstone annually sent to Germany rough, and imported here cut ready for setting, the stone-setting separately. Would suggest that a duty of 25 per cent. be put on stone out ready for setting.

6. Would point out that presentation cups, medals, &c., could be profitably made in the colony were an extra duty of 10 per cent. imposed.

7. Would recommend that a close inspection be made by Customhouse officers of all jewellery and fancy goods imported, and would suggest that an expert be employed for the purpose.

8. That an export duty of 2s. per pound be put on all rough greenstone exported from New Zealand.

9. That there is seventy-five thousand pounds’ worth of jewellery annually imported into New Zealand.

10. That any new pattern made in the colony, if likely to take, is sent Home by the importers and dealers to obtain quantities of a similar kind.

I may add that all kinds of testimonials for presentation, which different people in the town are well able to make, never come through our hands or chasing or to be embossed. During the last two or three years the shops sent Home all the old silver to be melted and made into presentation cups, &c., which are sent out to the colony. There is really nothing to be done here in our trade. I am not the only one in this state. Most of the jewellers here will hear me out that I am stating only the truth –nothing more nor less. The reason why we suggest that there should be a closer inspection by the Customs officials of all jewellery imported, and that an expert should be employed for that purpose, is that so many chains and different things are sent here so made up that no Customhouse officer, unless he be an expert, can tell whether or not they are gold. Perhaps they are sent among fancy goods, and pay little or no duty, just in the way that other jewellery, as brooches, ear-rings, and rings, are sent here, and all the while the colonial manufacture is at a standstill. The reason why we suggest a duty on the export of greenstone is that the local lapidary has no chance whatever, because the bulk of the greenstone is now sent either to Germany, or to Birmingham or Derby. In Derby there are plenty of lapidaries, and the greenstone is sent to them to make up in the slack season. It is sent back here ready for setting, and the local lapidary is in the same boat with ourselves–doing nothing. Here a man makes a pattern, and introduces it into the native work. There is the fern-leaf, for instance. Instead of the designer being able to command a good price for his ingenuity and skill, the house procures a copy of the design, sends it Home and has it copied; and the first thing the man who designed the pattern sees is what appears to be his pattern in all the shop-windows. This is, however, the sham character–the “ shin-plaster"–things which will tumble to pieces; whilst the colonially-made article is durable, and has a great deal more gold in it.

150. Mr. Stevens] When did the decline in the colonial trade take place ?–About three years ago.

151. Before that it was better ?–Oh, yes! We used to have something to do then.

152. How do you account for it ?–The action of the shopkeepers in sending Home for all their work has caused such a depressed state of trade. Now, as I have said, they even take our patterns and get the goods made in England from them. While we were able to keep our patterns to ourselves we had sufficient employment for ourselves and our apprentices. Now it is quite the reverse. My own son could get nothing to do here, and had to go to Victoria. In fact, none of our working jewellers have been able to keep their apprentices, but have been obliged to turn them away, and they have become diggers or gone into the bush. I could mention half a dozen different boys whom I have known as apprentices. Now I see them butchers or grocers, or some in the bush–doing anything but making jewellery. The duty is only 15 per cent., and the shopkeepers and warehouses do not consider it much.

153. They undersell the working jeweller, I suppose?–Yes; the imported work is not to be compared with the colonial. It is light, flimsy, and after six months’ use it is worthless. There is hardly any gold in it.

154. Mr. Bain.] Do you not think that the depression which the colony has been suffering from for some time has something to do with the depression of your trade ?––-No doubt; but very trifling compared with the duty.

155. Jewellery being articles of luxury, people cannot afford to spend money on those things in a time of depression ?–I have known the time here–during a gold-rush–when there were scarcely a dozen people to be met in the streets, yet we had plenty of work to do.

156. So far as I understand you, you complain that these imported articles of flimsy make are supplanting more solid articles of jewellery ?––Most decidedly.

157. That is a thing which cannot well be regulated. There is something in it, that the public do not discriminate between that which is substantial and that which is not ?–-They certainly do not. If I may he allowed to say so, it is the quantity which pays ; and it is the large quantity that is imported that makes our trade so depressed. Jewellery comes into this country to the amount of £75,000 annually. It is imported by the warehouses here from warehouses at Home. I may mention one house–P. Hayman and Co. There is one brother in Birmingham and one in Germany, and these men are kept buying, so as to keep getting discount. This quantity of jewellery still comes in, notwithstanding the depressed times. If we had the quantity to do that they have at Home, we could compete with and give a better article than the imported. The public would not suffer.

158. That applies only to gold jewellery ?–Yes.

159. The Chairman.] You do not do anything with silver jewellery ?–Oh, yes! we make cups.

160. Still, you have to import silver?–We have plenty of silver–cheaper than we can get it from Home. We get it at Auckland from the banks.

161. Mr. Bain.] Is it the fact that the local societies and local bodies prefer to send Home for their articles of silverware, such as medals and presentation cups ?–Yes; only a short time ago the Agricultural Society sent Home an order for a hundred and odd medals. One of the shopkeepers here got the tender for their supply; and, rather than employ local workmen, who had got the necessary machinery and everything ready for making the medals, he sends to Scotland to have the order executed. He is Scotch himself.

Another representative of the jewellers brought under the notice of the Commissioners that in India and Brazil native stones had an export duty placed on them if sent out of the country to be out. At the present time our greenstone from the West Coast was sent in large blocks to Germany, there to be cut; and the work was done at a price that placed the local lapidary and the jewellers who worked in greenstone at a great disadvantage.

162. Mr. Bain] What you want is an export duty similar to what is put on gold ?–Yes. It is usual to protect the local manufacturer, and to tax the rough stone going out of a country. Letting it out duty-free is encouraging the making of the article abroad.

Source: Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives of New Zealand - 1880

Trev.

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Re: Early New Zealand Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Feb 16, 2015 7:19 am

H.J. FREEMAN

Manners Street, Wellington


Image

Mr. H.J. Freeman, Watchmaker, of Manners Street, Wellington, was born in the town of Cambridge, and brought up in London. On 2nd December 1852, he sailed for Australia, landing in Melbourne May 3rd 1853. After spending ten years in Victoria, he left for Dunedin in 1863, returned to Melbourne November 1864, arrived in Wellington, 1866, was employed by Mr. Charles Campbell, Watchmaker, in whose employ he remained until Mr. Campbell retired in December 1877, when he took over the lease of the premises, and has carried on the business successfully since that date.

Source: Glimpses of the Australian colonies and New Zealand - William Jackson Barry - 1903


MYSTERIOUS EXPLOSION

Door of Jeweller's Shop Shattered

WELLINGTON (N.Z.) Sunday

People in the vicinity of H.J. Freeman's jeweller's shop in Manners-street, Wellington, at 8.30 on Saturday evening, were startled by a large explosion which completely shattered the door of the shop. Investigation revealed that gelignite had been attached to the handle and fired by a time fuse. Little damage was done and nothing is missing. The perpetrators motive is a mystery.


Source: The Sydney Morning Herald - 8th June 1931

Trev.


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