Early Australian Silversmiths

For information you'd like to share - Post it here - not for questions
dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Oct 28, 2017 11:30 am

WALTER HARLEY

Sydney


Walter Harley was an assigned convict and a specialist Buckle-Maker, although he also made flatware. He was formerly a silversmith in Dublin with convictions for transposing hallmarks and was later transported to New South Wales, where he arrived in 1815, for being in possession of forged tokens, he was at the time aged 57 years of age.

Harley was first assigned to to the former Dublin silversmith, John Austin, but was soon transferred to Jacob Josephson (see: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=14536&p=68770) whom he stayed with until 1820 at which point he was granted a conditional pardon.

In the later part of 1820, Walter Harley set up business on his own account at Castlereagh Street, Sydney. He died in May 1822.


An example of the mark of Walter Harley kindly supplied by member bstaunto:

Image
WH

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 04, 2017 2:46 pm

W.G.J. EDGAR

East Street, Rockhampton


Image
W.G.J. Edgar - Rockhampton - 1891


Image

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Nov 09, 2017 2:45 pm

REPORTS FROM THE CONSULS OF THE UNITED STATES IN ANSWER TO INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE


At the request of a Massachusetts firm, a Department instruction was sent, under date of January 16, 1902, to the consular officers of the United States, directing them to report in regard to the trade in foreign countries in silverware and plated ware, and especially as to the possible market for articles of American manufacture. Special information was asked as to the consumption of such goods in the respective consular districts; the extent of local manufacture; the importation from foreign countries as well as from the United States; the tariff on silver and plated goods; the obstacles to the extension of American trade in this line, if any existed; the proper methods of packing, etc.

The answers follow:

AUSTRALASIA

TASMANIA


CONSUMPTION AND TRADE

The customs returns classify plated ware and jewelry together, the imports of which being but $65,000, it is clear that the consumption of plate is very small. There is no local manufacture. As American goods are all imported via Sydney or Melbourne, no means exist for ascertaining the quantity of American manufacture, if any.


DUTY

The duty is 25 per cent ad valorem, but the tariff is now before the Parliament, and an alteration may be made.


OUTLOOK FOR AMERICAN WARE

There is no obstacle to the extension of American trade other than the limited demand due to the fact that this is not a wealthy community. It is not improbable that a protective tariff may induce manufacture in the larger States of the commonwealth.

A. G. WEBSTER, Consul
HOBART, March 20, 1902.


Source: Special Consular Reports - Silver and Plated Ware in Foreign Countries - Bureau of Foreign Commerce, Department of State - 1902

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Nov 14, 2017 5:36 am

A Listing of Jewellers and Watchmakers working in Brisbane in 1869:

WATCHMAKERS AND JEWELLERS

Cochran, J. & Co. Queen-street
Flavelle, Brothers & Co. Queen-street
Merkley, C. Edward-street
Morrell, C. Queen-street
Shott, C. W. Queen-street
Wollett, H. J. Ann-street, Valley
Weisser, Queen-street

Source: Street's Indian and Colonial Mercantile Directory - 1869

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Nov 18, 2017 5:14 am

HARVEY'S

327, George Street, and Liverpool Street, Sydney


Image
Image
Harveys - Sydney - 1957

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Dec 24, 2017 3:50 pm

A Listing of Jewellers working in Bendigo in 1901:

Bennetts - View Street
Edwards, J.B. - Pall Mall
Knowlton, James - Charing Cross
Melrose & Son - View Street
Prescott, F.N. - Mitchell Street
Welch, C. - Mitchell Street


Source: The Australian Handbook (incorporating New Zealand, Fiji, and New Guinea) and Shippers' and Importers' and Professional Directory and Business Guide - Gordon & Gotch - 1901

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Jan 30, 2018 3:00 pm

T.P. GERRARD

16, Queen Street, Brisbane


Image
T.P. Gerrard - Brisbane - 1878

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Feb 07, 2018 5:41 am

CHR. G. SCHICK

Adelaide Street, Brisbane


Image
Chr. G. Schick - Brisbane - 1878

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:16 am

ANTHONY HORDERN & SONS

New Palace Emporium, Brickfield Hill, Sydney


Image
Anthony Hordern & Sons - Sydney - 1908


HORDERN, Samuel, merchant, of Anthony Hordern & Sons, whose Emporium in Sydney is the largest of the kind in the Commonwealth; b. Sydney, 1848, and is the younger son of the late Anthony Hordern, founder of the firm. His elder brother Anthony dying in 1886, the present extensive business became the sole property of Samuel Horderm. He has been Commodore of the Prince Alfred Yacht Club, until recently took a leading part in the turf, and owns a stud farm at Wilton Park N.S.W., stock from which have realized high prices at the annual sales of yearlings. Address—Retford Hall, Thornton St., Woollahra.

Source: John's Notable Australians - Fred. Johns - 1906

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sun Mar 04, 2018 6:37 am

KENION & Co.

19, Queen Street, Brisbane


Image
Kenion & Co. - Brisbane - 1878

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Mar 15, 2018 3:13 pm

A Listing of Wholesale Jewellers Working in Hobart in 1933:

Butterfield, A.R., 51, Elizabeth Street
Flint, F.A., 116, Liverpool Street
Golding, W. & Son, Pty. Ltd., 78, Liverpool Street
Nielson, O., 135, Liverpool Street
Sargison, H.F., 19, Elizabeth Street
Taylor & Sharp, 47, Elizabeth Street


Source: Kelly's Directory Of Merchants, Manufacturers And Shippers Of The World - 1933

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Mar 19, 2018 3:13 pm

A Listing of Electro-Platers working in Sydney in 1901:

Griffith Brothers, 79, Liverpool Street
Paul & Sullivan, 3, Queen's Place
Sheffield Manufacturing & Plating Co., 309, Pitt Street
Walker & Hall
Watson & Crane, 375, Pitt Street
Willington Brothers


Source: The Australian Handbook (incorporating New Zealand, Fiji, and New Guinea) and Shippers' and Importers' and Professional Directory and Business Guide - Gordon & Gotch - 1901

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu Apr 05, 2018 2:09 pm

FIRST GOLD COINS STRUCK IN AUSTRALIA

Intercolonial Exhibition - Melbourne - 1866-67

Another and an historical curiosity is a couple of gold tokens, each worth one sovereign, which represent the first coins ever struck in Australia, the Adelaide Assay-office having preceded the Sydney mint. They remind the beholder of a time when by extraordinary vigilance and energy the South Australian Government managed to save the country from the comparative ruin which threatened to be the consequence of the migration of an enormous number of the population to the Victorian gold-fields in 1852. The whole story is too long to tell here, and it will be sufficient now to state that in the scarcity of sovereigns, the great desirableness of a free circulating medium in Adelaide, and the probability that notes would not be accepted in payment for gold, the government issued these tokens which, by act of council, were made a legal tender. They were coined from Victorian gold by Mr. Babbage, then government assayer, with self-feeding machinery contrived by him, and made in Adelaide, and are handsome coins, the edges being well milled. The gold was reduced by copper alloy to the Mint standard of 22 carats, and the weight of each token is 5 dwts. 15 grs, The price of the gold in South Australia then was £3 12s. an ounce, so that the banks who sent them home in quantity made immense profits out of the difference between the colonial price and the £3 17s. 9d. which was the ruling price in London. They were never much needed, it seems, for after all bank notes were freely taken and often preferred, and the wisdom of the ruling powers in making even small ingots bearing the stamp of the government Assay-office a legal tender effectually met the crisis.

Source: The Argus - 23rd November 1866

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Apr 24, 2018 1:12 pm

M.W. ASHER

Sydney


To CHARLES H. PROCTOR, Plating-Chemical Editor, THE METAL INDUSTRY:

In THE METAL INDUSTRY of May, 1922, in the article “Re Newark Platers," I notice the statement that you are the founder of The American Electro-Platers’ Society and chemical-editor of THE METAL INDUSTRY. Such being the case, I have taken the liberty of writing to you.

I am endeavoring to place my business in this country on the most modern footing.

In July, 1920, I visited the U. S. A., and called at THE METAL INDUSTRY ofiice, and entered a subscription thereto, which I have renewed by mail preceding this letter.

As I had arranged to stay only a very limited time in the States (thereby committing a great error of judgment), with a view to spending a longer period in England, I was unable to do very much other than inquire into modern methods.

I am at present considering making another trip to your country, and should such eventuate would spend a few months there.

Could you, through your society, arrange for me to get experience in several of the large electro-plating works using mechanical methods of plating, so that if I were to purchase a complete mechanical plating outfit, as advertised by your platers' suppliers, I would have the knowledge of the correct methods of using the same, and would be thus able to instruct members of my staff in the use thereof?

The plating industry is in a rather primitive stage in this country, but the possibility of further manufacture and therefore a greater business is here.

I would be pleased to hear from you as soon as possible if the arrangements suggested can be carried out.

Should your time be limited, you may be able to put me in touch with some other official of your society who could arrange what I desire.

Feeling sure from the courtesies shown me on my previous trip by the Americans with Whom I came in contact that you will do Your best for me.


M. W. ASHER. Sydney, N. S. W., Australia, June 21, 1922.


M. W. ASHER, Sydney, N. S. W., Australia:

Your very interesting letter of June 21 reached my hands several days ago on my return from a Middle West trip.

Your letter is of particular interest to me because I appreciate the fact that you turn to America to obtain the information that will enable you to practice the precepts laid down here for the advancement in the electro-plating industry.

It will be my pleasure to request the publication of your letter in The American Electro-Platers’ Society “Bulletin” and THE METAL INDUSTRY, requesting all members of the society who can possibly arrange visits to their respective plants for you especially in plating plants where mechanical plating is the factor, and to advise me direct in writing.

If you will notify me some time in advance of your possible arrival in America, the responses from the members of The American Electro-Platers' Society will be tabulated so that plants that in my estimation will prove of the most interest to you can be visited during your sojourn here.

C. H. PROCTOR. New York, N. Y.

September 1, 1922.


Source: The Metal Industry - October 1922

This is likely to be Maurice William Asher who was noted as being in business as an electroplater in Sydney in the 1930's, in partnership with Leslie Saul Asher.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue May 22, 2018 4:41 am

SIMPSON JEWELLERY Pty. Ltd. - JEWELCREST

307, Sussex Street, Sydney


Image
Simpson - 1968

Image
Simpson - 1968

Establish c.1940 by Donald Simpson. The Jewelcrest line was introduced c.1950.

Image


Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Thu May 31, 2018 2:59 pm

DUMBRELL'S

319-321, Bourke Street, Melbourne


MELBOURNE, January 16. A large number of valuable properties in the heart of the city, containing stocks running into many thousands of pounds, were menaced this afternoon by a fire which gutted a six-storied empty warehouse in Coles-lane, between Bourke and Little Collins streets. A splendid save was affected by the fire brigade. The task was made difficult by the fact that the area was very congested and the firemen were forced to attack the fire from the narrow lane, which would have become a death-trap had the fire got out of control. The fire is believed to have been caused by burning rubbish in the lane, which the police think was deliberately set afire. The fire brigade have been called out several times during the week-end to cases of burning rubbish in city lanes, and the police are of the opinion that a man is going about setting fire to them. The damage in to-day's fire will run into many thousands, as the whole interior of the building was burnt out. In addition, considerable damage was done by fire and water to several business premises adjoining, principally Edment's (fancy goods' merchants), Dumbrells (jewellers), and Dunkling's (jewellers). The warehouse was recently taken over by Sir Arthur Cooke, of Sydney, but so far as can be ascertained only the ground floor had been occupied.

Source: The Morning Bulletin - 17th January 1927


MELBOURNE, Friday.-Dumbrells, Bourke Street jewellers, reported to the police that a tray of diamond rings, valued at £380. was stolen from their premises last Monday by a person who leant over, the counter and took the tray from behind it. The theft was not reported earlier because the girl in charge of this collection was not on duty for two days.

Source: Army News - 22nd September 1945


Thousands of pounds worth of crystalware and crockery was destroyed by fire last night on the first floor of Dumbrells' jewellery store, Bourke st, city. It is believed that the fire started in a workroom and had been burning for some time before it reached the main upper showroom. Brigades from Carlton, Eastern Hill, and William St. prevented the fire from spreading to the ground floor, where valuable stocks of jewellery and diamonds were stored. A large crowd gathered, and traffic was diverted temporarily.

Source: The Argus - 31st August 1948


Edments Ltd. have purchased Dumbrells, jewellers, of 319 Bourke-street. This was announced by the chairman (Mr. A. J. Kirton) at the annual meeting yesterday. He said two stores at Burke-road, Camberwell, had also been acquired. The purchase in each instance would be financed by an issue of stock to the vendors.

Source: The Age - 23rd September 1950


Noted as the business of J.N. Dumbrell in 1930.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 04, 2018 11:58 am

HENRY A. TERNES

133, later, 195, later, 229, Nelson Place, Williamstown, later, Arlington Chambers, 229, Collins Street, Melbourne


Image
H.A. Ternes - Williamstown - 1896


Noted as a Watchmaker, Jeweller and Optician working in Williamstown in 1894.

Noted as a Watchmaker & Jeweller working in Melbourne in 1924.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Jul 27, 2018 6:10 am

HARRINGTONS Ltd.

386, George Street, Sydney


Image
Harringtons Ltd. - Sydney - 1920

Image
Harringtons Ltd. - Sydney - 1933

Established in 1906.

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 18, 2018 7:03 am

ALBION METALWARE Pty. Ltd.

132, Bridge Road, Richmond, Victoria


Image
Albion Metalware Pty. Ltd. - Richmond, Vic. - 1974

Trev.

dognose
Site Admin
Posts: 40564
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:53 pm
Location: England

Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 05, 2018 11:27 am

JAMES LINTON

Perth, WA


Further examples of James Linton spoons:

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
Gumnut - ST. SILVER - JAL

See: viewtopic.php?f=38&t=18484&p=66914&hilit=linton#p66914

Trev.


Return to “Contributors' Notes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests