Early Australian Silversmiths

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Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Nov 20, 2009 12:15 pm

FLAVELLE BROTHERS & ROBERTS

Queen Street, Brisbane.

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Flavelle Bros. & Roberts (John Flavelle, Henry Flavelle and John Roberts).

John Flavelle arrived in Sydney from England in 1844. In 1846 he entered in a partnership with Samuel Brush as Flavelle & Brush, this lasted until 1850 when Brush departed and John's elder brother Henry joining the firm to run the London side of the business now known as Flavelle Bros. John Roberts, a jeweller, who had worked for the firm since at least 1856 became a full partner in 1869 and the firms name styled as per the above advertisment.

Henry Flavelle's death in 1888 occured just after yet another change of name, this time to Flavelle & Roberts. In 1892 they became Ltd., and 1899 saw the death of John Flavelle and in 1900 the firm was called Flavelle Bros. Ltd.

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Flavelle Bros. & Roberts - Sydney, Brisbane and London - 1881

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Flavelle & Roberts - Brisbane - 1891

Trev.
Last edited by dognose on Wed Mar 03, 2010 1:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby MCB » Sun Nov 22, 2009 12:12 pm

HUGH CONNELL & SONS

142, Queen Street, Brisbane.

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Hugh Connell & Sons - Brisbane -

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Postby dognose » Sun Nov 22, 2009 1:02 pm

E.J. HOBSON

Stanley Street, South Brisbane.

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E J Hobson - Brisbane - 1885

Silverly noted the following:

There is an 1855 Sydney Australia immigration record for Edwd J Hobson. I believe that there is a fair chance that this is the same gentleman.

Edmund Jephson Hobson is listed the 1861 Sydney Commerical Directory at 344 South Head Road as a watchmaker.

1903 South Brisbane Electoral Roles watchmaker Manning Street, St Albans/

1905 South Brisbane Electoral Roles watchmaker Manning Street.

1908 Queensland Death Register shows that he was the son of Henry and Edith Hobson and died in 1908.


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Postby dognose » Tue Nov 24, 2009 3:18 am

ELKINGTON & Co.

Sydney

An 1888 account of Elkington's branch in Sydney that was opened in 1886.

ELKINGTON & CO. (LIMITED), Silversmiths, by special appointment to Her Majesty the Queen.–As a branch of the great business in London, Manchester, Liverpool, Birmingham, Paris, and Calcutta, the Sydney establishment of Elkington and Co. may be taken as an evidence of the colony's greatness in the eyes of the commercial princes of the old world. The principal manufactory is in Birmingham, where fifteen hundred hands are kept constantly employed in turning out articles representing every branch of the gold and silversmith's art. The goods are all of the finest quality, and consist of sterling silver articles, electro-platedware, and gold jewellery of chaste and artistic design. The firm are the patentees of electro-plating, and have done much to bring that art to its present state of perfection. The Sydney house at 881 George Street was opened in 1886. and is allied to a local manufactory where electroplating in all its branches is carried on. Goods are replated by the firm's patent process promptly, and without the expense and delay attached to sending them to England, as was formerly the case. At present there are employed from twenty-five to thirty hands, which number it is anticipated will greatly increase as our population becomes larger, and more people acquire the wealth necessary to the indulgence of luxury. The goods are imported from the English works, and are supplied to the Sydney public at London prices. At the establishment in George Street may be seen tea and coffee services, candelabras, ornamental shields and trophies, and a miscellany of choice articles too extensive to admit of a lengthy notice being now given. A visit to the house will more than repay the curious, who will have every opportunity given them to admire one of the finest and most profuse displays of the kind to be found outside London.

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Postby dognose » Tue Nov 24, 2009 4:17 pm

JOCHIM MATTHIAS WENDT

84 (later 76), Rundle Street, Adelaide.

An 1869 advertisment for perhaps Australia's most pre-eminent silversmith, Jochim Matthias Wendt.

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J.M. Wendt - Adelaide - 1869

Born in Holstein, at that time part of Denmark, on the 26th June 1830, he served his apprenticeship in the same village that he was born, Dageling, near the town of Itzehoe. This part of Northern Europe had been a point of disputed territory for years and with war with Prussia looming on the horizon, Wendt struck out for the new world and a life in Australia.

He arrived in Adelaide in 1854 and appears to have gone straight away into business on his own account, a business that still, I believe, survives today, still in control of the Wendt family and still at the Rundle Street address.

Jochim Wendt was an exhibitor at many of the great 19th exhibitions, including London, Paris, Melbourne, Sydney and Philadelphia. His great rival at home in Adelaide and at these major events was the great Henry Steiner whose business was in the same street as Wendt, but it was Wendt that usually came out on top and in 1867 he was awarded the Royal Warrant as jeweller to the Duke of Edinburgh.

Wendt had a long and mostly successful career, he also diversified into property development and mining. He died on the 7th September 1917.


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J M Wendt - Adelaide - 1907



An example of a mounted emu egg by Jochim Matthias Wendt.

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Wendt was known to have used a variety of marks, in this case it's 'crown', 'WENDT', 'lion'.


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Postby dognose » Fri Nov 27, 2009 2:14 pm

JOHANN HEINRICH STEINER

106, Rundle Street, Adelaide.

An 1878 advertisment from Johann Heinrich (Henry) Steiner.

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H. Steiner - Adelaide - 1878

Steiner was born in Rodenberg near Hanover in 1835. He arrived in Adelaide in 1858 and set up in business on his own account around 1860. Steiner was a very prolific silversmith who, like his great rival Jochim Wendt, exhibited at many of the great 19th century exhibitions around the world.

A downturn in trade in the late 1870's and early 1880's caused by depression and drought, followed by the loss of his wife and two children in the 1883 typhoid epidemic, saw Steiner sell off his business to August Brunkhorst and he returned to Germany in 1884. He returned to Adelaide in 1887 after the failure of several Australian banks that he had invested in, and stayed a further two years and then returned again back to Germany where he died on 24th July 1914.


A piece made by Henry Steiner (see above) and an example of his mark.

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Photos courtesy of Steve Westfield

The mark to the left, is a crown, and the mark to the right is a lion passant.


A description of Henry Steiner's display at the 1881 Adelaide Exhibition:

...A step or two to the south, and we come to the rich and tasteful productions of the silversmith's art as they are adequately exemplified by the efforts of Mr. H. Steiner, the well-known jeweller of Rundle Street. His large showcase of plate-glass is handsome, and admirably arranged, the case itself being surrounded by a convenient space, covered with Brussels carpet, and enclosed by a light ornamental railing.

In the display of silverware, much depends upon the art of disposing the goods so that one article can set off the other. This has been done with judgment. The exhibits are as varied in character as they are numerous and unique in design. One of the striking objects is an Egyptian vase of silver, which shows in fine contrast to some elegant English tea and coffee services, a host of cups of peculiar style, huge eggs tastefully mounted in burnished silver, jewel caskets, inkstands, claret jugs, and suchlike contrivances. Visitors are not likely to overlook a handsome epergne, which for style and finish reflects credit upon Mr. Steiner's craftsmen. In this work of art the twined trunks of a pair of palmtrees, with their graceful leaves in frosted silver, support a cut-glass dish, and, at the foot, two well-executed figures of Arabs, with that invaluable ship of the desert, the camel, are grouped on what is intended to represent an oasis, and which forms the pedestal. A three-branched candelabrum, 34 inches high, and composed of a solid silver palm tree on a triangular pedestal resting upon tigers' claws, is a rich and costly construction. On one side is represented a shield with the royal arms, and on the other side the arms of the City of Adelaide appear. The whole is embellished with ferns and other lovely specimens of foliage, executed with the minutest attention to detail. A truly Australian design rivals this in finish, and consists of a large epergne of burnished and frosted silver. The principal parts about it are a hollow eucalyptus, which, with its natural-looking branches and leaves, sustains a cut-glass dish. The pedestal, nearly 50 inches in circumference, is of hammered silver, and is made to represent a rocky piece of ground. A bushman on horse-back is shown on one side after a kangaroo, and on the other an aboriginal with his lubra is watching for a chance at the game. A flock of sheep in another part are shown feeding quietly, and on the top of a large rock are grouped three natives, one in the act of cooeying, and the other poising a spear, while a lubra is seated on the ground with a dead snake. The finish of this example of the handicraft of the silversmith is admirable. There is a larger specimen than this, and also Australian in its leading features. This is a six-branched candelabrum, 38 inches high. The design is a vine in full bearing, branching out so as to support the sockets for the candles and cut-glass bowls. Surrounding the whole is a large cut-glass receptacle for flowers. The massive pedestal has niches cut in it, each showing a colonial view, one being a kangaroo hunt, another a group of sheep with their shepherd, a third, a small mob of marsupials, and an emu, with a blackfellow on the alert with spear poised for throwing. Several other native figures are shown in natural attitudes, and the general effect is rich and rare, the burnished and frosted silver being very skilfully distributed. Two stags are also introduced, and the candelabrum is also embellished with wheat-ears and malachite. The remainder of Mr. Steiner's exhibits are chaste and worthy of admiration.

Several of Mr. Steiner's exhibits are similar to those shown by him in Melbourne, and for which he received first prize and a recommendation for the Emperor of Germany's prize. Those sold by him there have been replaced for the Adelaide Exhibition by goods of newer style. In another case he has a choice collection of drawing and dining room clocks, also carriage clocks arranged in a pleasing manner. The clocks are of various sizes, from 2 inches upwards. There are also English and Swiss specimens of timekeepers. A third showcase is fitted up with electro-plated ware of the newest designs from the establishments of leading English electro-plate manufacturers. In addition to this, a pyramid is reserved for a display of antique bronzes calculated to at once arrest attention.


Source: South Australia: a brief account of its progress and resources Published by The South Australia Commissioner of Crown Lands and Immigration - 1882.


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Postby dognose » Wed Dec 02, 2009 10:05 am

JOHN W. DAVIS

92, Rundle Street, Adelaide.

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John W. Davis - Adelaide - 1878

John Davis established his business in Adelaide in 1849. He died on the 10th November 1868 aged fifty-one years. An account of his funeral noted that his hearse was followed to his grave by seventeen mourning coaches, amongst the mourners were Perryman, Steiner, Schlank and Sawtell, all prominent in the silversmithing trade in Adelaide.

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Postby dognose » Thu Dec 10, 2009 4:03 pm

WILLIAM EDWARDS

85, Collins Street East, Melbourne.

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This is William Edwards, another of the Australian big boys.

William's father was Thomas William Edwards (Grimwade 2745). Thomas, a former apprentice to John Robins (Grimwade 1623, 3678), was noted as being in trouble with Goldsmiths Hall in 1839 for adding silver to items after they had been returned from assay.

William Edwards entered his mark at Goldsmiths Hall on the 7th January 1843 as a Smallworker from the same address as his father, 23, Ratcliffe Row, St Lukes. He moved on the 11th March 1846 to 19, Sekforde Street, Clerkenwell.

Edwards arrived in Melbourne in July 1857, in the details of his passage he was described as being 38 years of age. He initially set up at 129, Collins Street and moved to 85, Collins Street East c.1872.

One of Edward's journeymen in Melbourne was thought to be Joseph Forrester, a former apprentice of Robert Keay the elder of Perth in Scotland (For further detail see: http://www.925-1000.com/a_OB_Mathey1826.html

Edwards was a participant at the International Exhibition in 1861 and the International Colonial Exhibition at Melbourne in 1866. In c.1873 he was joined in partnership with Alexander Kaul.

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Postby dognose » Thu Dec 17, 2009 5:58 am

M.L. WATT

Shamrock Cottage, Little Bourke Street, Melbourne.

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M L Watt - Melbourne -

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Postby dognose » Thu Jan 14, 2010 3:28 pm

G. COCHRANE

Commercial Street, Mount Gambier.

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G. Cochrane - Mount Gambier - 1869

Silverly noted the following: George Derbyshire Cochrane's birth was registered in Bright, Victoria, Australia in 1846. He was the son of James Cochrane and Mary Gilchrist of Glasgow and Gartmore, Scotland respectively. He married Caroline Emily Simmons in 1868 at Mount Gambier. His death was registered at Terragon, Victoria, Australia in 1902.

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Postby dognose » Thu Feb 11, 2010 9:17 am

An excellent article written by Kevin Hitchins. Kevin is, as well as being a gold and silversmith, the President of The Gold and Silversmiths Guild of Australia.


Australian Hallmarking a brief History


Makers Marks- Sponsors Marks-Trade Marks or Associations Marks on Precious metal has a long History in Australia due mainly to our Colonial British past and the centuries old tradition of British Hallmarking, which was a well established practice even at the foundation of our country back in the late 1700’s.

Most Marks found on Australian jewellery and silverware date from the early 1800’s and early Colonial smiths used either the master smiths initials or the full name often with devices that were replicas of The British Assay Offices- it is common to see articles made by Alexander Dick of Sydney Town, or David Barclay of Hobart Town, with A.D. or DICK NSW along with a lion rampant or leopards head, or DB along side an anchor symbol. The Gold and Silversmiths in the Australian colonies were not subject to the rigors of an assay office, nor were duty bound to uphold the regulations of the British Hallmarking Acts, rather, the pseudo-Hallmarks found on colonial precious metal wares were a voluntary guarantee by the manufacturer that the article was genuine. Gold items from this early 1800’s period, if quality stamped at all, would probably have been of 18ct or 22ct, corresponding to the English Standards, as the 18ct gold standard had been introduced in London in 1798, however from the 1850’s native gold was used in the colonies for much of the jewellery fashioned in the immediate gold rush period. This work was often Makers Marked but rarely quality stamped. In 1854 the lower standards of 9, 12, 15 carat were brought into use in Britain, primarily to allow the British manufactures to compete with the European and American makers that were making unregulated lower carat jewellery, particularly watch cases and fob chains.

The Royal Mint opened its Sydney office in 1855 and the Melbourne office in 1872, so specified gold coinage was readily available, and many old formulae for gold alloys relate to converting gold sovereigns or guineas to 9-15 or 18 carat alloys for jewellery. By the 1870’s Melbourne merchants were pressing for the introduction of a Hallmarking system, in fact, parliamentarian The Hon. J.G. Francis returned to England in 1874 to petition the British Government, unsuccessfully, for its introduction to colonial Victoria. (Sutherland 1888). Manufacturing of precious metal ware although initially starting in Sydney and Hobart, centered around Melbourne by the end of the 1800’s possibly due to the wealth caused by the gold rush and also due to the large amount of commerce conducted through the port of Melbourne.

This concentration of gold and silversmiths in Victoria led to the first Industry Association, namely- The Manufacturing Jewellers Association of Victoria, which was founded in 1889, this association applied three guarantee marks to its work, the first mark identified the manufacturer, and the second was a quality mark in carats and the third was a device guaranteeing the quality of material and workmanship. The device was an Australian symbol significant for its time — 9ct ‘Sheaf of wheat’- 12ct ‘Pick and shovel’- 15ct ‘Fleece’ (suspended sheep) - and 18ct ‘sailing ship’. One of the publications of this association dated December 16th 1903 shows seven members, and by the beginning of World War 1 there were 26 registered Makers, in 1920 the 12carat standard was dropped, and due to the attrition of workshops caused by the war the association faded during the 1920’s.

In 1910 The Manufacturing Jewellers Association of NSW was formed and significantly, became the Gold and Silversmiths Association of NSW in 1924, Sydney Manufacturers continued to use Makers Marks consisting of initials or full names, and the first instance of a registered trade mark, Robert Rollason’s — back to front ‘RR’ symbol. Their distinctive device to guarantee metal quality and NSW origin was markedly different to Victoria, the metal standards of 9ct,15ct and 18 carat gold were accompanied by a ‘Kookaburra’ and ‘silver 925 was accompanied by a ‘Wren’.

The early 1900’s not only saw the two major states form their own associations. An independent non-profit company was established for the purpose of testing assaying and stamping quality gold, silver and other metals and articles; in 1916 The Sydney Hall Mark Company was registered. Retail Jewellers were the major protagonists for the formation of the company and at the 1920 Brisbane Conference of the Federated Retail Jewellers’ Association the principal of the Hallmark was adopted unanimously. The following marks were adopted on gold articles; the symbol was a ‘Kookaburra’, with this stamp accompanied by marks indicating gold standard in carats and parts per thousand, and for silver articles the symbol was a ‘Wren’ with metal quality in parts per thousand. Punches for this Federated Hallmarking system were cut by W.J. Amor of Sydney. The registered Makers Mark and a year letter were to be stamped in all cases and in keeping with the British system the order of stamping was ; Makers Mark, Kookaburra, carat-Parts per Thousand-Date Letter. The Date letter commenced with ‘A’ for 1923 and to distinguish the state of origin the Kookaburra or Wren would be a perfect oblong for NSW, the top right corner removed for Victoria and the top left corner removed for SA and the bottom left corner removed for QLD. A brochure of 1922 shows the scale of charges for stamping articles, and records show that the Sydney office stamped 13,712 articles of gold in its first year and 1,061 articles of silver. The Melbourne office was to stamp less than 500 and the South Australian Office had no assayer available. Despite the efforts of the trade associations, many retail, wholesale, manufacturing companies, gold and silversmiths Australia wide acceptance of the “AUSTRALIAN HALL MARK” for gold and silver was not to be realized. The roaring ..20’s gave way to the great depression and then the Second World War and due to lack of support the Hall Mark Co. discontinued operations in 1940- its effective period of operation was from, 1922 until its demise in 1940 , a total of 18 years. The Federated Retail Jewellers Association acquired the rights to the Marks and in 1964 the company marks were removed from the Commonwealth register. Although many manufacturers and retailers instituted their own systems of marking and many adopted ‘Australiana’ devices and symbols the “Australian Hall Mark” was the only truly official system.

In the years since the end of World War 2, the Australian Jewellers Association attempted to introduce the Jewel Mark for its membership, which registered each sponsor or manufacturer by use of its distinctive device — a stylized diamond crystal and a numerical reference to each member, along with the metal purity mark. Despite a well organized plan, the system failed due to a lack of support from its membership.

In 1988 a group of Gold and Silversmiths formed The Gold and Silversmiths Guild of Australia, its principle aim was to establish a system of registering Makers Marks, identifying an article as Australian made and of stated metal quality, with the provision for identification of year of manufacture. The Guild attracts a membership of dedicated gold and silversmiths, jewelers, designers and artisans who want their individually- designed and hand crafted pieces to be acknowledged for what they are- unique, beautiful examples of hand raised hollowware and plate, jewellery and articles made form precious metal.

The Guild system identifies, the Maker, the Metal purity, the Australian origin and the Date of manufacture and is in its 20th year of operation making it the longest running attempt at voluntary ‘Hall marking” in Australia. In line with tradition Guild members Place their Makers Mark first, which is a distinctive device usually a design showing their initials or it may be a sign or symbol, second is the metal purity mark, which is expressed in part per thousand — millesimal system, and has the elemental substance shown as a pictogram boarder and complies with Standards Australia regulations, the third mark is the Guild symbol- a Kangaroo head set in a square on its diagonal pictogram boarder, the final stamp is the Date Mark which follows the convention established by the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths UK and incorporates the current UK script Letter in the Australian Guilds Distinctive square on its diagonal Boarder. In line with the UK convention the Date Letter changes on the first of January each year and by agreement the Four Stamps appearing on Gold and Silversmiths Guild work is referred to as GUILD MARKING and not Hall marking as the GSGA system is not administered by a Hall.

Kevin J J Hitchins
President- The Gold and Silversmiths Guild of Australia
http://www.gsga.org.au
Chair- Precious Metals Committee- Standards Australia
http://www.saiglobal.com


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Bibliography: Australian Jewellers, Gold and Silversmiths — Makers Marks By Kenneth Cavill, Graham Cocks & Jack Grace 1992

Article reproduced by kind permission of Kevin Hitchins


http://i46.tinypic.com/2vac9k2.jpg
Gold & Silversmiths Guild of Australia


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Postby dognose » Wed Mar 03, 2010 1:02 pm

WALKER & HALL

Electro Plating Works, Sydney

This house has been in existence for over three-quarters of a century, and it holds the honoured position of being the pioneer in the great art industry with which its name is associated, the electro deposition of gold and silver. One has only to reflect for a moment upon the universal use of electro plate at the present day to understand what a mighty trade was originated at Sheffield some seventy-five years ago. The present senior partner, Colonel Sir John E. Bingham, J.P., entered the business at sixteen, and has advanced step by step through all its grades to his present position, and is now the oldest master electro plater living. When Sir John E. Bingham joined the firm it mustered twenty hands; now it employs over two thousand work people. Messrs. Walker and Hall manufacture every class, not only of electro plate, but also of solid silver ware and the best table cutlery. In all their goods the firm maintains a high standard of merit, which is quite unsurpassed, and they hold very large stocks of the various goods, the exquisite design and finish of which may be seen to advantage in the warehouses and showrooms in the various States. The general quality of each article is attested by the presence of the trade mark of the house, a flag bearing the letters W. and H. Messrs. Walker and Hall hold the highest awards it has been possible to gain at every exhibition at which their goods have been placed in competition. Branch business establishments of a thoroughly up-to-date character have been opened up in the various States of the Commonwealth, and the firm is ever to the front in utilising Australian labour wherever practicable.

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The New South Wales general manager is Mr. Albert E. Nash, one of Sydney's most popular citizens, who is ever to the front in furthering the best interests of everything Australian.

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Source: Australian Industry ... By Federal Council of the Chambers of Manufactures of Australia - 1906

Trev.

(For details of the Adelaide branch of Walker & Hall, see below)
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Postby dognose » Fri Mar 26, 2010 3:39 pm

F. OCHERNAL

248, Rundle Street, Adelaide.

F. Ochernal, Watchmaker, 248 Rundle-street, Adelaide. The business conducted by this gentleman, is situated next to the Exeter Hotel, and is the principal one of the kind in this end of the street. Mr. Ochernal spent ten years with some of the leading firms of Adelaide, viz., H. Steiner, Alfred Day, and J. M. Wendt, and has been in business for himself in Broken Hill and Teetulpa, finally settling at the above address. He is a native of Breman, Germany, where he received his education and business training, after which he followed his trade in various parts of Europe. He served with the infantry during the Franco-Prussian war in 1871, under General Manteuffel, and received a war medal. He came to Australia in 1879, landing at Port Adelaide, and has followed his trade ever since coming to the colony, doing good work at moderate charges. He is a member of the Leidertafel, and at various times has been secretary of the German Club, at present holding the position of vice-secretary, and takes a general interest in the colony.

Source: Descriptive Australia & Federal Guide by J. Smillie - 1890

Silverly noted the following:
Frederick (Fritz) Ochernal was born in Bremen Germany in about 1855 and immigrated to Melbourne, Australia in 1878. He died in South Australia in 1936.


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Postby dognose » Sat Mar 27, 2010 10:54 am

AUGUST LUDWIG BRUNKHORST

110, Rundle Street, Adelaide.

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A.L. Brunkhorst - Adelaide - 1907

This is August Ludwig Brunkhorst, the successor to Henry Steiner (see above). Brunkhorst gained control of the business in 1884 when Steiner returned to Germany.

Brunkhorst arrived in Australia from Germany in 1875, he joined Kindermann & Co. in 1877 and the firm became known as Kindermann & Brunkhorst. It is unclear when this partnership was disolved and it is possible that Brunkhorst worked for Steiner before Steiner's departure.

The photo in the advertisement is the same premises as Heny Steiner's, Rundle Street was renumbered in 1892 with 106 becoming 110.

August Brunkhorst died in 1919, aged seventy one, his business was taken over by Caris Brothers.

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Postby dognose » Sun Mar 28, 2010 1:50 pm

FREDERICK BASSÉ

92 & 94, Rundle Street, Adelaide.

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F. Bassé - Adelaide - 1907

This is Frederick Bassé who was born in Dusseldorf, Germany around 1852. He probably arrived in Australia in the early 1880's and died there on the 7th April 1913. His firm appears to have continued after his death.

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Adelaide Chamber of Commerce detail - 1899

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The Mining Review - 1904

The mark of Frederick Bassé:

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Postby dognose » Mon Apr 05, 2010 2:15 pm

FREDERICK ALLERDING

25, Hunter Street, Sydney.

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F Allerding - Sydney - 1873

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F Allerding & Son - Sydney - 1876

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F Allerding & Son - Sydney - 1881

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F Allerding & Son - Sydney - 1888

Styled as F. Allerding & Son as from 1876


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Postby dognose » Sat May 01, 2010 12:11 pm

CHARLES CARLISS

Linde's Lane, Adelaide.

Charles Carliss, Manufacturing Jeweller, Linde's Lane, Adelaide. – This gentleman's business includes the manufacturing of jewellery, electroplating, and gilding, in all their branches. He has been established here over nine months. He is a native of Birmingham, and landed in Melbourne in August of 1879. Before coming to Australia he had a good deal of experience in some good houses at home. Since starting here he has been fairly successful, and by close attention to business is fast working up a good connection.

Source: Descriptive Australia & Federal Guide by J. Smillie - 1890

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Mon Jul 12, 2010 6:05 am

J. PERRYMAN

46, King William Street, Adelaide.

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J. Perryman - Adelaide - 1872

Perryman was noted as one of the mourners at the funeral of John Davis (see above) in 1868.

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 03, 2010 2:48 pm

GEORGE P. HARRIS, SCARFE & Co.

Gawler Place, Adelaide. Also, Perth, Broken Hill, Fremantle, and London.

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Geo. P. Harris, Scarfe & Co. - Adelaide - 1907

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Geo. P. Harris, Scarfe & Co. - Adelaide - 1908

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Re: Early Australian Silversmiths

Postby dognose » Tue Sep 21, 2010 12:08 pm

HENRY NEWMAN

123 (later 175 & 177), Elizabeth Street, Melbourne.

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H. Newman - Melbourne - 1886

Henry Newman was a known manufacturer of watch chains and alberts, and perhaps a lot more. He was an exhibitor at the Intercolonial Exhibition in 1866-7 and received an 'Honourable Mention' for his gold chains as 'good for cheapness of workmanship', which I guess means that they were good value for the money.

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H. Newman - Melbourne - 1896

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