Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Premises

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Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Premises

Postby dognose » Fri May 10, 2013 12:22 pm

The manufactory of the Meriden Britannia Company at Meriden, Connecticut:

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This image is from 1883.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Sat May 11, 2013 7:25 am

The premises of The Dueber Watch Case Manufacturing Company located at Newport, Kentucky:

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The plant was in operation from 1874 until 1889 when it moved to Canton, Ohio, to share the premises of its sister company, the Hampden Watch Co.

This image is from 1884.




An interior view of the premises of the Dueber Watch Case Manufacturing Company located on the south-west corner of Fourth and Race Streets, Cincinnati.


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This image is from 1875.

The Dueber Watch Case Manufucturing Company's Establishment is situated in the building on the south-west corner of Fourth and Race Streets.
Mr. John C. Dueber established this business in 1864. The business grew steadily ever since, and the Dueber Watch Case Manufacturing Company was incorporated in 1873. The floor-space now occupied by their manufactory exceeds 12,000 square feet.
The accompanying engraving illustrates one of the main rooms of their manufactory, where about 60 skilled workmen are employed. They manufacture all kinds of Gold and Silver Watch Cases, and the reputation the "Dueber" Witch Cases have made for themselves, in all the States, from Maine to California, is abundant proof of their superiority and intrinsic value.
Long years of experience enables the Dueber Watch Manufacturing Company to turn out watch-cases of great beauty, and in those of high cost great elaboration of detail. It has always been supposed– owing to the want of experience, great skill required, and the high price of labor in America–that the business of watch-case making, and particularly the finer descriptions of these articles, would be confined almost exclusively to Switzerland; but the American energy and enterprise have supplied ingenious machines and expert workmen, whose efforts have been crowned with success, and many of the beautiful cases made by this company vie in costliness, workmanship, and finish with the finest productions of the best foreign artists.


Source: Illustrated Cincinnati - Daniel J. Kenny - 1875

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Sun May 12, 2013 3:47 am

The American Watch Company's factory at Waltham, Massachusetts:

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This image is from 1883. The company restyled their name to the American Waltham Watch Company in 1885.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Mon May 13, 2013 4:54 am

The manufactories of the Jas. Boss and Keystone Watch Cases at Nineteenth and Brown Streets, Philadelphia:

Image

This image is from 1883.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Wed May 15, 2013 3:53 am

The premises of Samuel Kirk & Son Co. at Baltimore, Maryland:

Image

This image from 1904.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Thu May 16, 2013 5:57 am

The premises of the Lancaster Watch Company at Lancaster, Pennsylvania:

Image

This image is from 1881.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Sun May 19, 2013 2:28 pm

The premises of the important jewellery retailers, Ovington Brothers, located at 246-252, Fulton Street and 110, Clark Street, Brooklyn, New York:

Image

This image is from 1884.

At the time the business was run by Theodore T. and Edward J. Ovington, and later by their respective sons, Charles and Edward, Jr.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Sun May 26, 2013 8:11 am

An image of the proposed new premises of the Mermod & Jaccard Jewelry Co. at St. Louis, Missouri:

Image

The new building was constructed on the corner of Broadway and Locust Street and replaced their former premises at that location that were destroyed by fire in December 1897.

The new structure was eight stories in height, and fronting 100 feet on Broadway and 127 feet on Locust Street. The salerooms were located in the basement and the eight floors above ground were the factories producing jewellry, silverware, and stationery and 170 offices.

The business had its origins with Louis Jaccard who arrived in St. Louis in 1829. He was joined by his relatives, A.S. Mermod in 1845, and D.C. Jaccard who had arrived in St. Louis in 1843. In 1865 they were joined by Goodman King.

This image is from 1898.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 03, 2013 3:06 pm

The new jewelery plant of S.O. Bigney & Co. at Attleboro, Massachusetts:

Image

This image from 1900.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 10, 2013 9:16 am

The manufactory of Theodore W. Foster & Bro. Co. at Providence, Rhode Island:

Image

This image is from 1907.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Tue Jun 18, 2013 10:22 am

The manufactory of the Mauser Mfg. Co. located at Columbus and Washington Avenues, Mt. Vernon, New York:

Image

This image is from c.1900.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Sat Jul 20, 2013 9:41 am

The premises of the Franklin Jewelery Company at 704, Chestnut Street, Philadelphia:

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Image

These images are from c.1880.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Thu Jul 25, 2013 5:30 am

The La Perla jewellery store located at 38, Avenue Francisco I. Madero, Mexico City:

Image

This image is from 1922.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Tue Aug 06, 2013 4:06 pm

The premises of the manufacturing and wholesale jewellers Heeren Brothers & Co. at 42, Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA:

Image

This image is from 1884.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 09, 2013 9:17 am

The premises of David F. Conover & Co., Chestnut Street. Philadelphia, PA:

Image

This image is from 1884.

David F. Conover & Co. were successors to William B. Warne & Co. They were manufacturers and wholesalers of watches, jewellery etc.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 14, 2013 3:41 pm

The premises of Lucius Hart, a manufacturer and importer of Britannia wares and plated goods, located at 4 & 6, Burling Slip, New York:

Image

This image is from 1857.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 21, 2013 3:28 pm

The premises of Krementz & Co. situated on the corner of Chestnut and Mulberry streets, Newark, New Jersey:

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This image is from 1893.

At the South-west corner of Chestnut and Mulberry streets, the firm of Krementz & Co., carry on their extensive jewelery manufacturing business. They occupy the greater part of the large four story brick buildings, having a frontage of 185 feet on Chestnut and 55 feet on Mulberry street, also the rear extensions. Our artist has given a faithful portrayal which has been transferred to these pages. The business was commenced in 1869, in a comparatively small way by Messrs. George Krementz and J. A. Lebkuecher, and the same parties with the able corps of assistants which they have gathered about them still carry it on, and have enlarged it to its present proportions. Messrs. Krementz & Co., manufacture a large line of jewelery, principally for ladies wear, and their productions have attained a high reputation with the trade throughout the country. One of the specialties manufactured by this firm we shall not fail to mention, and that is the "Krementz one piece collar button" the invention of Mr. Krementz, which has become the standard collar button of the country, and which is largely exported to Europe. As a mark of the progress in the art, this button now made of a single piece of metal without seam or joint was formerly made of several pieces soldered together, any one at all acquainted with the manipulation of metal will see at once the superiority of this button, the metal having suffered nothing of the annealing effect of the soldering process of the old method, with the consequent softening which must eventually follow. The business offices and salesrooms of this company are at 182 and 184 Broadway, corner of John street, New York city.

Source: Newark, N.J. Illustrated - 1893


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This image is from 1912

Krementz Co.
In no branch of skilled industry perhaps in the world, has more rapid advances been made than in the jewelers' art, and the industrial pursuits of a kindred nature. In former years, especially for the finer and more artistic productions in these lines, the American people were compelled to look to Europe for their jewelry supplies, but to-day Europeans look to America, to Newark, which manufactures fully seven-eighths of all the jewelry in the whole United States, and is noted for its beauty of designs, excellence of workmanship and highest standards.
One of the more prominent concerns devoted to this important industry, which has done much toward placing Newark to the front as a manufacturer of jewelry and well worthy of more than passing mention is that of Krementz & Co., located at 49 Chestnut street, with branch offices at 286 Fifth avenue, New York City and 722 Shreve Building, San Francisco, Cal., was established in 1868 by George Krementz and Julius A. Lebkuecher, which partnership has continued to the present date and has developed into one of the largest and best known firms engaged in the manufacturing of fine 14 karat gold and platinum jewelry, the line being probably the most extensive and complete one of fine jewelry made under one roof.
To give an idea of the magnitude of the Krementz productions, their wares consist of about forty different lines of jewelry, of which the following are the most important:
Ladies' jewelry–Brooch pins, veil pins, necklaces, lavalliers, bar and handy pins, bangles and bracelets, lorgnons, souroirs, etc. Men's jewelry–Scarf pins, sleeve links, vest buttons, studs, chains, fobs, match boxes, tie clasps.
Krementz & Co. are also the manufacturers of Krementz collar buttons, w hich enjoy a national reputation; in fact, are known the world over, and are made in 18 karat, 14 karat, and 10 karat gold and 14 karat rolled gold plate. One of the latest achievements of this concern is its new patented Bodkin fastener which it uses on mother-of-pearl vest buttons and studs for evening dress. While these mother-of-pearl dress sets for gentlemen are much in vogue now and finding a very ready sale, this new Bodkin attachment has given a very material impetus to the popularity of this line.
The very newest of its creation is the making of the bean and post of a gentleman's cuff button of one single piece of metal. This feature has greatly increased the output of men's cuff buttons.
The richness, strength, durability and beauty of style and finish of the jewelry which this establishment turns out, are marvelous. A firm and unalterable determination from the start to use nothing but the best and purest among materials, to employ artists of the highest order, and workmen of skill and character, it has built upon this foundation an industry of grandeur and promise.
The illustration shown above of the Krementz building gives an idea of the large space and facilities required in the manufacture of the various products, while in the neighborhood of three hundred skilled workers are continuously employed to conduct this immense business.


Source: Newark, the City of Industry: Facts and Figures Concerning the Metropolis of New Jersey - Published under auspices of Newark Board of Trade - 1912

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 23, 2013 2:16 pm

The premises of Carter, Sloan & Co., situated at the corner of East Park and Mulberry streets, Newark, New Jersey:

Image

This image is from 1893.


CARTER, SLOAN & CO.
AMONG the nearly one hundred firms engaged in this popular branch of industry, none has taken a higher stand or watched its growth more closely than Carter, Sloan & Co., which came into existence November 1, 1841, under the firm name of Pennington, Carter & Dorenius, each individual name of which having a fame co-existant with the rise and progress of Newark to the high standing of her manufacturing greatness to-day. Their factory was first established on Broad street, just below Green, but very soon after Aaron Carter, Jr., bought out his partners, associated others with him in the business, and removed to a little factory on Green street near Broad. In consequence of increasing business the more capacious building at the corner of Park and Mulberry streets, was purchased, and in July, 1853, the jewelry manufacturing establishment of the firm was moved to these new and more commodious and convenient quarters. The firm name at that time was Carter, Pierson & Hale. It is not out of place in this connection to mention the interesting fact that the power made use of by the firm at this time was derived from the engine built by the illustrious mechanic and inventor, Seth Boyden, which had been used in the machinery exhibit at the World's Fair building, known as the old New York Crystal Palace. In 1873 the increasing demands of the firm's growing business made it necessary to enlarge their factory, and extensions were built on both Park and Durand streets, making the building a square letter U, a speaking photo of which our artists have transferred to these pages. On January 1, 1881, the present firm name of Carter, Sloan & Co. was adopted. They have one of the most complete plants for the manufacture of gold jewelry in this country, which includes all the improved devises in labor-saving machinery, enabling the firm to employ, as they have for many years, more hands in the manufacture of solid gold jewelry exclusively, than does any other manufacturer in this country, England, France or Germany, as far as any record is attainable. At the present time there are at least two men actively employed in the factory who came with the original firm as apprentices over fifty years ago, when the business was organized. In this grand old factory have been trained many of the most successful jewelry manufacturers in Newark, as well as in many other branches of business, who have from time given up their positions to organize a business of their own. The members of the firm as at present organized, are Aaron Carter, Jr., of Orange, N. J.; Augustus K. Sloan, of Brooklyn, N. Y.; Courtland E. Hastings, of New York City ; George R. Howe, of East Orange, N. J.; William T. Carter, of Newark, and William T. Gough, of New York City, while Aaron Carter, Jr., has remained the honored head of the firm during all the changes of the fifty years now closing. He has taken no active part in the business for the past twenty years.


Source: Newark, N.J. Illustrated - 1893

For details of the successors, Carter, Howe Company, see below post.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Sun Aug 25, 2013 4:02 pm

The premises of George A. Scheller, located at 290, Market Street, Newark, New Jersey:

Image

This image is from 1893.

GEORGE A. SCHELLER
IN A town in which the manufacture of jewelry is on a phenomenal scale and has great weight in determining the general activity, it would be the natural inference that there should be found individual experts in the business, men who have all the technique of the various branches of the jewelers' art at their fingers ends, and who can and do outclass the then wonderful workers of olden days. An example of such a one is found in Mr. George A. Scheller, of 290 Market street, near Pennsylvania railroad depot. Mr. Scheller is one of those rare men, who can take the raw material and make a watch from beginning to end ; artistic worker in chains and rings, in setting of diamonds and other precious stones, and in solid gold and silver work. With the accomplishments of the thorough artisan, Mr. Scheller combines the taste of the artist, and is withal a scientifician in the matter of time, so that he has become to Newark its sextant and chronometer. Naturally he is highly regarded in both industrial and social circles, and his highest testimonial is his success. His handiwork is all over the city, and many a watch that guides the movements of millionaires, business men or mechanics comes to him when occasion demands for his professional scrutiny. Mr. Scheller makes a specialty of American watches, and carries a fine line of jewelry. He is authority on diamonds and other precious stones.


Source: Newark, N.J. Illustrated - 1893

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufacto

Postby dognose » Thu Aug 29, 2013 4:09 am

Three views of American retail jewellers:

The premises of the Herbert Jackson Co. at Oakland, California:

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The premises of L.S. McFee at Fredonia, Kansas:

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The premises of Jacob Bennett at Norfolk, Virginia:

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All these images are from 1922.

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