Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Premises

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dognose
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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Sun Apr 26, 2015 4:27 am

Wm. ROGERS Mfg. Co. Ltd. (Likely)

Two images of the electric furnace for annealing German silver flatware blanks that was installed by, what was only described as, "a Niagara Falls maker of plated flatware" (so likely Wm. Rogers Mfg. Co. Ltd.):

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These images are from 1914.

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Tue May 12, 2015 12:26 pm

BLACK, STARR & FROST

A couple of images of the new premises of Black, Starr & Frost, located on the corner of Fifth Avenue and Forty-Eighth Street, New York:


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These images are from 1912.

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Sun May 24, 2015 8:10 am

VAN BERGH SILVER PLATE Co.

Two images of the plating department of the Van Bergh Silver Plate Co. of Rochester, New York:

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The plating department at Van Bergh's was headed by George H. Hesselink (image below):

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These images are from 1920.

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 03, 2015 12:11 pm

ONEIDA COMMUNITY Ltd.

Four images of the new Oneida Community Co.Ltd. works located at Niagara Falls, Ontario, opened in 1916 to supply the firm's Canadian trade:

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The testing laboratory

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The polishing room

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The plating room

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Another image of the plating room


The branch, overlooking the Arch Bridge and fronting onto the Michigan Central Railroad, was managed by a Mr. A.G. Reeves and a Mr. Van Auken.

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Fri Jun 05, 2015 5:11 pm

JOHNSON, HAYWARD & PIPER

An image of the new factory of Johnson, Hayward & Piper, located at 154, Cedar Street, Somerville Highlands, Massachusetts:

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This image is from 1909.


THE HOME OF "DUTCH SILVER"

The new factory of Johnson, Hayward & Piper, at 154 Cedar Street, Somerville Highlands, Mass., is one of the finest factory buildings in the country, and has been so acknowledged by different engineers who have seen it. The plant is mill construction.

The dimensions of the building are 55x102x46, there being 11 feet 6 inches between floors. The foundation and first floor are built of concrete. Separate building for the boiler and power house, 42x20x16 feet, is also of concrete. The mill construction is of hard pine, planed, and the heavy timbers are 16x14 inches. It was built with a carrying capacity of two hundred pounds per square foot. All the floors are of two-inch heavy planks, on top of which is 7/8-inch matched maple.

The factory is equipped with electric elevator, has its own electric light plant and power plant, which consists of a new one-hundred horse power Hodge boiler—50-60 horse-power at its most economical point; Brown engine. The electric light plant is thoroughly modern, and has a lighting capacity of one thousand lights.

It has its own water plant, which consists of an artesian well. In order to get a sufficient supply of water for the building it necessitated drilling through two hundred and sixty feet of solid rock. The steam water pump has a lifting capacity of twenty-five gallons of water per minute.

The general offices of the factory are very roomy and light, with a private office which is commodious and thoroughly up to date.

The plating room is probably one of the finest in the United States, being laid out and fitted with every electrical contrivance known to the trade for plating and coloring, with the least possible expense. It is claimed by the manufacturers that their "Dutch Silver" never tarnishes, and will give exceptional wear. Johnson, Hayward & Piper have been known as the "House of Dutch Silver" for several years. They were the first manufacturers to carry a stock of these goods in New York City. They are now equipped to turn out thousands of dollars' worth of buckles, pins and jewelry every day, and their factory is always busy, even at times when trade conditions are reported to be dull.

The firm takes great pride in the designing and finishing of the goods they manufacture. Each department is systematized, and is under a competent head. They have designers constantly working out new ideas. They have a die-sinking and tool-making department to produce the dies and tools. In their coloring room they have a man who is constantly experimenting for new shades. They make a specialty of producing the latest colorings that come into vogue from time to time. Their Dutch silver and Dutch gold color and their Dutch silver and Dutch gold trade-mark have a world-wide reputation. Its selling qualities are unequalled. Their French tint and silver tint goods have been sold by many jobbers as imported jewelry, and cannot be told from the imported articles. Their jewelry is designed by artists of well-known repute in their line.

They have installed in their new factory the fullest equipment of machinery — automatic drop presses, wire-drawing machines, jewelry rolls, annealing furnaces, tubing machines and hundreds of other small machines, which are necessary in order to fit up a first-class factory.

They have a special enameling and tinting department, which is done by secret process, and is kept under lock and key and no one is allowed to enter there except the head of the department. This secret process alone cost this firm a great deal of money and is done by patented machinery which does the work economically and properly and requires skilled workmen in the line to accomplish the desired results.

Not only is the factory a thoroughly up-to-date one and modern in construction, but it has several new and novel ideas which seem to be very practical.

On the top or fifth fioor Mr. Piper has a four-room apartment, fitted up and furnished as a living room, sleeping room, with kitchenette, shower bath, hot and cold water and everything thoroughly modern, which may be used by himself at any time when at the factory.

He has also, in connection with the factory, a private modern up-to-the-minute garage, built of concrete, in which he can keep his machine when in the city.


Source: Notions and Fancy Goods - April 1909

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Sun Jun 07, 2015 11:31 am

JOHNSON, HAYWARD & PIPER

Taking a step back from the above post that details the new factory of Johnson, Hayward & Piper, below are some images of their earlier premises that were located at West Somerville, Massachusetts:

Apologies about the missing section in the first image, the fold at the binding of the magazine meant that part of the image could not be captured.

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These images are from 1904.

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 10, 2015 1:51 pm

FISCHER & PRUEFER

An interior view of the jewellery manufacturers, Fischer & Pruefer, of Providence, Rhode Island:

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This image is from 1918.

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Wed Jun 17, 2015 7:22 am

WHITING Mfg.Co.

An image of the new factory of the Whiting Mfg.Co. located on Bishop Avenue, Bridgeport, Connecticut, next to the N.Y.N.H. & H.R.R.:

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This image is from 1910.

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Mon Jun 22, 2015 10:06 am

EDWARD WECK

An image of the shop-front of Edward Weck, situated at 387, Fulton Street, Brooklyn:

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This image is from 1908.

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Thu Jul 02, 2015 5:00 am

HORTON, ANGELL & Co.

An image of the manufactory of Horton, Angell & Co. located at Attleboro, Massachusetts:

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This image is from 1897.

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Tue Jul 28, 2015 10:18 am

HOLMES, BOOTH & HAYDENS

An image of the manufactory of Holmes, Booth & Haydens located at Waterbury, Connecticut:

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This image is from 1858.

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Thu Jul 30, 2015 3:40 am

JENNINGS BROTHERS MANUFACTURING Co.

An image of the manufactory of the Jennings Bros. Mfg.Co., located at Bridgeport, Connecticut:

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This image is from 1903.


The accompanying illustration represents the factory buildings of The Jennings Brothers Manufacturing Company, located at Bridgeport, Conn., U.S.A. This company is one of the leading and most enterprising manufacturing concerns in Connecticut; it began business in the year 1890, occupying to begin with, less space for its entire business, than it now utilizes for office room alone. The hard work, aggressive and sagacious management, combined with liberality and fidelity in dealing with customers, has won for The Jennings Brothers Manufacturing Company a clientage and reputation equalled by few and excelled by none.

Its business is the manufacture of clocks, in metal cases, candelabra, art metal and silver plated flatware. Among the numerous finishes applied to its many designs and large variety of goods made, is its Ormolu gold plate which is manufactured exclusively by this company, and marketed under the trademark "J. B. Ormolu gold." This finish is the most beautiful and durable of any similar gold finish made, and is the result of years of investigation and experiments, and is now acknowledged to excel anything produced here or abroad.

Bronze finishes are also produced, and are most popular, as applied to art goods; their many dainty colorings perfect and bring out the artistic features and detail of the designs, to which it is most appropriately applied. These goods are in competition with imported goods of French manufacture, and are sold under the name of "Nouveau Bronze," or "Art Nouveau," which is at present so much in vogue.

French grey silver, and old brass finishes are also applied to novelties in candelabra, inks, trays, etc., and make most pleasing objects of art and utility.

Silver plated flatware is sold under the company’s exclusive trade-mark, “1890 Jennings Bros.,” and in each package is furnished a certificate of guarantee that the goods are as represented, or purchase money refunded. Such a guarantee gives some idea of the integrity of the company’s dealings with its customers.

On such products as are not sold under one of the regular trade-marks, when practicable the initials "J.B.” appear on the article, for the purpose of identifying the company’s product.

The floor space now occupied approximates 100,000 square feet which gives some idea of the rapid growth since the business was established in 1890.

Goods of its manufacture are shipped to all states and territories of the United States, Australia, New Zealand, England, Africa, South America and Hawaii. The company is capitalized at $100,000, and its officers and directors have continued the same since its organization, and to these men, who have given their undivided time, is due the success of The Jennings Brothers Manufacturing Company.

Its oflicers are Erwin M. Jennings, President; Edward A. Jennings, Treasurer, and Henry A. Jennings, Secretary, three brothers, reared on a Connecticut farm, entering business to make their own way, and who now enjoy the confidence of all who know them.


Source: Annual Report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, of the State of Connecticut - Connecticut Bureau of Labor Statistics - 1903

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Sat Aug 01, 2015 9:15 am

WILLIAM B. DURGIN Co.

An image of the manufactory of the William B. Durgin Co., located at White Street, opposite White Park, Concord, New Hampshire:

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This image is from 1915.

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Mon Aug 10, 2015 11:50 am

SAMUEL P. HAMILTON

An image of the premises of Samuel P. Hamilton, located on the South West Corner of Bull and Broughton Streets, Savannah, Georgia:

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This image is from 1886.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Wed Aug 12, 2015 11:21 am

MAIDEN LANE

An image of Maiden Lane, the heart of the New York jewellery industry:

Image

This image is from 1919.

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Fri Aug 14, 2015 7:07 am

MAIDEN LANE

Another image of Maiden Lane, this time from c1890:

Image

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Wed Sep 02, 2015 12:28 pm

ROGERS & HAMILTON Co.

An image of the factory of the Rogers & Hamilton Co. at Waterbury, Connecticut:

Image

This image is from 1898.

Trev.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Manufactories

Postby dognose » Fri Sep 18, 2015 7:24 am

W.H. ROGERS

An image of the plating room at W.H. Rogers, Muncie, Indiana:

Image

This image is from 1908.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Premises

Postby dognose » Sun Sep 27, 2015 2:38 pm

LEWIS J. HENISE

An image of the premises of Lewis J. Henise, located at 324 West Market Street, York, Pennsylvania:

Image

This image is from 1899.

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Re: Views of American Silversmith's and Jeweller's Premises

Postby dognose » Tue Oct 06, 2015 5:13 am

SMITH & Co.

An image of the premises of Smith & Co., Britannia ware manufacturers and electro-platers, located at Albany, New York:

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This image is from 1856.

Trev.


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